Trench Sections

Joined: April 27th, 2018, 1:58 pm

June 13th, 2018, 10:16 am #1

781666[1].jpg 781667[1].jpg 781668[1].jpg 781669[1].jpg 781672[1].jpg 781670[1].jpg 762548.jpg 762552.jpg You may well have seen my sections circulating on the internet. I used to blog on how I make them on MilMod, but thought I'd finally get round to posting on here. They are 1:32 scale and feature mostly Tommy's War figures, but most of the equipment I scratch-build myself.
Andy 666423.jpg
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Joined: July 10th, 2016, 11:49 pm

June 13th, 2018, 11:58 am #2

I've seen those pictures on line before.  I think the models are absolutely fabulous and the attention to detail and skill displayed are wonderful.  And thoroughly educational and informative, speaking as a former Sapper.

I can think of a Museum with a Trench Story exhibition for whom a set of illustrative models like this would be an excellent exhibit.
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Joined: April 27th, 2018, 1:58 pm

June 13th, 2018, 1:16 pm #3

Peter Smith wrote: I've seen those pictures on line before.  I think the models are absolutely fabulous and the attention to detail and skill displayed are wonderful.  And thoroughly educational and informative, speaking as a former Sapper.

I can think of a Museum with a Trench Story exhibition for whom a set of illustrative models like this would be an excellent exhibit.
Where Peter? They were on display in an exhibition in South London for a year (35,000 visitors), but are currently in storage because my house got flooded. I'm looking for a permanent home when they're finished. Meanwhile they're educating online. (Google WW1 trenches or models and they appear.)
Andy
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Joined: June 6th, 2007, 12:28 am

June 13th, 2018, 5:22 pm #4

Fantastic stuff! I read through all of your blog posts on MilMod and thought they were gone forever. Thanks for posting them here!

Russ
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Joined: April 9th, 2018, 7:51 pm

June 13th, 2018, 8:14 pm #5

Great work, and thank-you for posting it! Really useful reference.
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

June 13th, 2018, 11:21 pm #6

Those are cool. As an FYI if you don't have the figures and want to do another diorama, the ICM US Infantry and US weapons include neat trench periscopes
DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: April 27th, 2018, 1:58 pm

June 15th, 2018, 7:05 am #7

David Nickels wrote: Those are cool. As an FYI if you don't have the figures and want to do another diorama, the ICM US Infantry and US weapons include neat trench periscopes
Thanks. I've noticed the ICM sets and lots of helpful things, but they're 1:35 and I'm working in 1:32. Frustratingly close, but there is a noticeable difference between the scales. Thankfully I can scratch-build, so make most of the bits and pieces that I need.
Thank you guys for your encouragement. I am planning my own website with blogs on how I make things - this will replace what was lost from MilMod. (I had a very on-going popular thread on there.)
Andy
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

June 15th, 2018, 11:43 am #8

I'm the opposite. I work in 1/35 and can only find 1/32 stuff. Although i do need a number of 1/32 seated British in 1914 uniforms 
DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: February 28th, 2005, 9:36 pm

June 15th, 2018, 4:53 pm #9

Beautiful dioramas.

When visiting Zonnebeke (near Ypres) a few years ago, the museum complex there had a recreated trench system that led you round a route where each length was recreated as if it was British, German and French as shown by the models.

Chris 
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Joined: January 24th, 2014, 6:40 pm

June 15th, 2018, 5:50 pm #10

I helped build a replica system at the old Chalke Valley History Festival site a couple of years ago. The project was lead by the Cranborne Ancient Tecnology Centre who as archaeologists were keen to ensure authentic design. It deliberately used a mix of technologies for revetting. And because they were dug in chalk just like those on the Somme, the back walls were not revetted at all. Unfortunately the Health and Safety people didn't like this and nobody was allowed in the trenches for the event! The whole process was done from scratch - cutting the hazel, building hurdles (there are photos of great stacks of these behind the lines), tying bundles of brash and building with rough sawn planks (especially from the sawmill - not the planes smooth wood from the DIY shop). An ex-soldier showed us how to bend corrugated around corners with spade and hammer! The images are from before the sandbags were put in place on the parapet - so you can see the stakes and wire - we learnt a lot of short cuts - two wires to one stake - how to quickly tension the wire, etc. Oh yes, and a lot of time making duckboards - with the angled runners so they fit easily end to end.

Will

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