toothpaste for weathering

Hosted by Dave Parker from AFV Modeller magazine and Adam Wilder, this discussion group is geared towards modelling technique questions ranging from construction to final weathering. This forum was created so that "newbies" can post without being intimidated by the sometimes highly technical nature of the other discussion groups.

toothpaste for weathering

Joined: April 1st, 2006, 2:35 pm

April 14th, 2006, 8:10 pm #1

It would like to share with you an technique that I´ve discovered by chance about 10 years ago. It's a technique of wheathering an winter camouflage that I used in the Tiger I tank (Italeri early).
While I didn't have an airbrush I was trying to paint the camouflage of a German tank. I painted the base color with acrylic paint (Tamiya) and I fixed cotton flocks to the surface of the tank with tothpaste. Later I used an spray paint to apply to another disruptive color. Everything failed! The spray paint melted the plastic. The tank was not very good anyway... But the interesting one was to see the effect of the toothpaste on the acrylic paint.
The toothpast released the paint of the surface as if it had been wore out. I didn't care about it that moment, but later, analyzing real photos of tanks in the winter season, I used up of its applicability.
The technique is very simple:
· Aplly the enamel paint base color (Testors or Humbrol.) This kind of paint is immune to the action of the toothpaste;
· Let the base color dry at least for 24 hours;
· Aplly the second color (the one that will be wear out) using acrylic paint. I used Tamiya. Enamel like Testors Model-master do not serve for this purpose! The acrylic dries faster and you don't need to wait more than one hour to go to the next step.
· Use small brushes, depending on the size of the area that will be wear out. Take with the brush an small amount of toohtpaste and spread it only in the center of the areas that will be wear out. Be economic! Let the toohpaste act per some minutes (different toohtpastes have different behaviors);
· With a clean and wet brush, start to spread and to remove the toohpaste. Rub a little to increase its efficiency. Please, don't use your brand new brush for this. With the brush you can "draw" the abrasion area.
· With water, removes all toohpaste in excess, taking care of not to wear out an undesirable area.
If you was not fully satisfied with the result, just aplly again the acrylic paint and to try the process once more.
Those photos show you the the result:
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Cheers
Carlos Cafe



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Joined: March 10th, 2001, 7:57 pm

April 15th, 2006, 1:56 pm #2

I like the effect on your Tiger. I will have to give this a try. Thanks for the Tip!

Best Regards,
Mark
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 2:48 am

April 28th, 2006, 4:33 pm #3

It would like to share with you an technique that I´ve discovered by chance about 10 years ago. It's a technique of wheathering an winter camouflage that I used in the Tiger I tank (Italeri early).
While I didn't have an airbrush I was trying to paint the camouflage of a German tank. I painted the base color with acrylic paint (Tamiya) and I fixed cotton flocks to the surface of the tank with tothpaste. Later I used an spray paint to apply to another disruptive color. Everything failed! The spray paint melted the plastic. The tank was not very good anyway... But the interesting one was to see the effect of the toothpaste on the acrylic paint.
The toothpast released the paint of the surface as if it had been wore out. I didn't care about it that moment, but later, analyzing real photos of tanks in the winter season, I used up of its applicability.
The technique is very simple:
· Aplly the enamel paint base color (Testors or Humbrol.) This kind of paint is immune to the action of the toothpaste;
· Let the base color dry at least for 24 hours;
· Aplly the second color (the one that will be wear out) using acrylic paint. I used Tamiya. Enamel like Testors Model-master do not serve for this purpose! The acrylic dries faster and you don't need to wait more than one hour to go to the next step.
· Use small brushes, depending on the size of the area that will be wear out. Take with the brush an small amount of toohtpaste and spread it only in the center of the areas that will be wear out. Be economic! Let the toohpaste act per some minutes (different toohtpastes have different behaviors);
· With a clean and wet brush, start to spread and to remove the toohpaste. Rub a little to increase its efficiency. Please, don't use your brand new brush for this. With the brush you can "draw" the abrasion area.
· With water, removes all toohpaste in excess, taking care of not to wear out an undesirable area.
If you was not fully satisfied with the result, just aplly again the acrylic paint and to try the process once more.
Those photos show you the the result:
[/IMG]

[/IMG]

[/IMG]

[/IMG]

[/IMG]

Cheers
Carlos Cafe


Thanks for the tip Carlos! And bythe way - awsome diorama!
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Joined: December 7th, 2003, 8:11 pm

May 3rd, 2006, 6:45 pm #4

It would like to share with you an technique that I´ve discovered by chance about 10 years ago. It's a technique of wheathering an winter camouflage that I used in the Tiger I tank (Italeri early).
While I didn't have an airbrush I was trying to paint the camouflage of a German tank. I painted the base color with acrylic paint (Tamiya) and I fixed cotton flocks to the surface of the tank with tothpaste. Later I used an spray paint to apply to another disruptive color. Everything failed! The spray paint melted the plastic. The tank was not very good anyway... But the interesting one was to see the effect of the toothpaste on the acrylic paint.
The toothpast released the paint of the surface as if it had been wore out. I didn't care about it that moment, but later, analyzing real photos of tanks in the winter season, I used up of its applicability.
The technique is very simple:
· Aplly the enamel paint base color (Testors or Humbrol.) This kind of paint is immune to the action of the toothpaste;
· Let the base color dry at least for 24 hours;
· Aplly the second color (the one that will be wear out) using acrylic paint. I used Tamiya. Enamel like Testors Model-master do not serve for this purpose! The acrylic dries faster and you don't need to wait more than one hour to go to the next step.
· Use small brushes, depending on the size of the area that will be wear out. Take with the brush an small amount of toohtpaste and spread it only in the center of the areas that will be wear out. Be economic! Let the toohpaste act per some minutes (different toohtpastes have different behaviors);
· With a clean and wet brush, start to spread and to remove the toohpaste. Rub a little to increase its efficiency. Please, don't use your brand new brush for this. With the brush you can "draw" the abrasion area.
· With water, removes all toohpaste in excess, taking care of not to wear out an undesirable area.
If you was not fully satisfied with the result, just aplly again the acrylic paint and to try the process once more.
Those photos show you the the result:
[/IMG]

[/IMG]

[/IMG]

[/IMG]

[/IMG]

Cheers
Carlos Cafe


The result of your technique looks great.
I was just wondering if it matters if you used a gel type tooth paste or the all white kind (seriously).


best regards,




Marc Brandes
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