Tamiya GB --> JS-2 building steps from 1 to 6.

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Hosted by Luciano Rodriguez and Pat Johnston, this discussion group is dedicated to 1/48 scale AFV, vehicle and figure modelling.

Tamiya GB --> JS-2 building steps from 1 to 6.

Joined: March 26th, 2003, 4:28 pm

May 27th, 2012, 3:47 pm #1

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.

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Joined: May 16th, 2009, 9:02 am

May 27th, 2012, 4:35 pm #2

This isn't just a Tamiya Group build. It's a modelling masterclass. I can't wait to see this one progress. Great work.

John.
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Joined: August 2nd, 2005, 12:40 pm

May 27th, 2012, 6:18 pm #3

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.
Hi Ricardo, really great build with very nice attention to detailing

Best

Paul

p.s
Looking forward to your next update too
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Joined: January 24th, 2006, 5:08 pm

May 27th, 2012, 6:19 pm #4

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.
... what can I say. Nothig, the pictures speak for themselves. Great work, I just hope the nuts and bolts will be visible after the weathering!

Regards
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Joined: June 4th, 2011, 7:09 pm

May 27th, 2012, 6:34 pm #5

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.
supreme work. I wish I have that much attention to detail as you.

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/
https://www.facebook.com/rvscale/
https://roman-the-modelmaker.blogspot.no/
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Joined: August 15th, 2006, 12:22 pm

May 27th, 2012, 6:41 pm #6

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.
not yet a JS-2 built... a good lesson for "the modelling and patience" for all of us...

and i have seen ever best SBS pics... nice and clear!

congrats,
murat
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Joined: October 3rd, 2005, 9:15 am

May 27th, 2012, 8:39 pm #7

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.
Hi Ricardo!

Well... not a bad start for your first 1/48th scale armour!

Perfect execution and great attention to detail!! Amazing SBS as well, BTW! Not a surprise for me. I already knew you are a gifted modeller indeed.

Looking forward your next installment!

Regards!
Alvaro

PS I love the subject chosen!
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Joined: April 27th, 2005, 1:33 pm

May 27th, 2012, 9:05 pm #8

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.
Your suspension detailing is just magnificent! Any suggestions on where to get some of those resin bolt details? They are exquisite - as is your work

Konrad
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Joined: March 11th, 2006, 1:27 pm

May 28th, 2012, 7:10 am #9

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.
Hi Ric,

This is one of the best SBS I've seen, no need for Tamiya instructions, this is much better.

I hope to see progress soon

Domin
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Joined: January 7th, 2009, 10:46 am

May 28th, 2012, 7:37 am #10

Hi everyone!

Here you have my perverse entry for he Tamiya GB, and I say perverse because I believe 1/48 is a perverse scale for AFVs and when Alvaro told me to make a quick build in a couple of weeks I thought so, but this model is also perverse because if reader wants to know the version I am making, then just google images for Tank Prague and the one that calls your attention immediately is the chosen one to me.



Nuts & bolts:

Oen of the things I more like of AFVs is it is very easy to find areas to improve during assembly, in my case to add nuts, bolts and weld seams is frankly enjoyable to me. I first started by adding bolts in the return roller housing. With a compass one can mark the right positions perfectly spaced and drill later. My favourite tiny bolts are from MasterClub, made in resin ready to use- are frankly excellent but expensive too.



I used Future because it is a perfect glue for this. It's clean, dries fast, it flows on every gap and it does not leave apparent residiuals.



I repeated the same operation in the housing of the suspension arms, but in this case there as there are two lines of bolts and I dont have 0.6mm resin bolts, I used Lion Roar PE bolts glued on top of the formers. Those PE bolts are also easy to use but is hard to place them correctly centered.




With the aid of the Punch & die set I made bolts for the stoppers of the suspension arms and glued them with capillarity cement.



But there are no 0.2mm rounded head rivets in resin nor PE, so for making rounded head rivets nothing better than The Nutter tool. Once done, rivets are glued with future.



Model conversión:

Assembly of the lower hull is very easy just making sure all suspension arms sit well.



The changes on the lower front glacis are as follows:

1 I deleted the rounded edges of the plate by adding Super Glue and sanded the whole plate to delete the casting texture.
2 instead of two single spare links at the ends without teeth I added two halves (one upside down)
3 instead of the 4 spare links part I used 4 single links with teeth



At the rear plate I removed the spare links, added the weld seams (kneadatite epoxy putty) and added the stoppers for the hinges with some styrene bits.



The main point of the conversión is to rebuild the original full casted nose by the hybrid model that combines casted upper nose interlocked with steel plate lower glacis.



To rebuild the nose I added cyanocrilate to fill the rounded edges...



... and a good file and carefully sanding will make the correct shapes and dimensions of the part.



After dry-fitting the impression is good. Later on I will add the interlocking between plates, logically.



Undercarriage:

The JS its a long and narrow tank. On its running gear it uses one standard road wheel as idler which is quite unusual to me. Tamiya provides poly caps for the sprockets that are very helpful for adjusting the tracks.



Also the asymmetry of the torsión bars is well represented in the kit, hence road wheels are located in different positions on each side. That is also important when adding the tracks later.



Contrary to what instructions indicates, the sprocket can be removed after placing the (mud) cleaning bar.

Sprocket is well reproduced, but removing the mold seam along the part was quite tedious. I added some tiny bits on the hub bolts and second line of bolts over the original rounded bolts in the part. Well, that is not ideal but better than nothing. Unfortunately I had not got 0.5mm resin bolts to replace the ones on the outer ring unfortunately.



In general speaking, I believe this whole area of the Tamiya kit is well reproduced, with excellent fitting and without big cleaning problems apart the traditional seams along the road wheels. And if the true problem of 1/48 scale kits is the lack of really fine detail, nowadays there are multiple resources for adding as much as you want.

My personal impression is return rollers hub caps should have been a bit smaller perhaps...



And now I can move on the model. One of the greatest advantages of AFVs in general -to me- is that following the instructions one moves form the hardest to the most enjoyable part.

Thanks for looking
Ric.
.... see to belive!

Excellent detailing work .. and the idea is just superb!

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