Tackling a complex kit.

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Tackling a complex kit.

Joined: April 25th, 2005, 12:47 am

June 27th, 2012, 3:28 pm #1

Need some opinions on building a fairly complex kit.
I'm talking about the Hobbyboss M1070. But it pertains to any kit really.

1. Paint the pieces on the sprues? This would make gluing difficult since I would have to remove paint before gluing. I have done this before though, You would only need to touch up paint later.

2. Build and paint in sub-assemblies. This would take much longer for the build and you'd still need to glue pieces later.

3. Assemble the entire kit and paint later. But then you'd really have a tough job getting paint to those out-of-the -way areas.

4. Build an Aurora monster kit and hand paint it.(My front porch, early 60's)

I'm leaning towards option 4.

Owen
Inquiring minds want to know....
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Joined: July 13th, 2004, 1:39 am

June 27th, 2012, 4:01 pm #2

"3. Assemble the entire kit and paint later. But then you'd really have a tough job getting paint to those out-of-the -way areas."

This is always my method. I will leave off the wheels and and other parts that may be painted a different color than the rest of the model. I use an airbrush and have had no issues getting paint in all the "out-of-the-way areas". The paint will go where it can be seen. Areas it can't go most likely will not be seen once fully built anyways.

The only exception is the interior. I build and paint the cab interior as I go since it will be closed up and can't be effectively painted later and it has a lot of detail painting in it.

Gino P. Quintiliani

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Joined: October 9th, 2006, 11:41 pm

June 27th, 2012, 4:19 pm #3

Need some opinions on building a fairly complex kit.
I'm talking about the Hobbyboss M1070. But it pertains to any kit really.

1. Paint the pieces on the sprues? This would make gluing difficult since I would have to remove paint before gluing. I have done this before though, You would only need to touch up paint later.

2. Build and paint in sub-assemblies. This would take much longer for the build and you'd still need to glue pieces later.

3. Assemble the entire kit and paint later. But then you'd really have a tough job getting paint to those out-of-the -way areas.

4. Build an Aurora monster kit and hand paint it.(My front porch, early 60's)

I'm leaning towards option 4.

Owen
Inquiring minds want to know....
I just finished construction on this kit. Leave it in sub assemblies! It will make painting much easier for you. I normally do build the entire kit first, but not on this one.
Dave
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

June 27th, 2012, 6:41 pm #4

Need some opinions on building a fairly complex kit.
I'm talking about the Hobbyboss M1070. But it pertains to any kit really.

1. Paint the pieces on the sprues? This would make gluing difficult since I would have to remove paint before gluing. I have done this before though, You would only need to touch up paint later.

2. Build and paint in sub-assemblies. This would take much longer for the build and you'd still need to glue pieces later.

3. Assemble the entire kit and paint later. But then you'd really have a tough job getting paint to those out-of-the -way areas.

4. Build an Aurora monster kit and hand paint it.(My front porch, early 60's)

I'm leaning towards option 4.

Owen
Inquiring minds want to know....
Its a large, complex model but in the end it builds about like any other model.

My thoughts on your thoughts:

1) if you paint the parts on the sprues, you still have to remove the mold seams from every parts, plus the various sprue points, any mold pin marks etc. And you will have to remove the paint from the gluing areas. This is a really bad idea 99.9% of the time, espeically on models where the majority of the parts are the same base color.

2) Sub assemblies is a good starting point. Its not that big of a deal to glue a few major sub assemblies together after painting versus every single part. It doesn't take longer to build in sub assemblies either, really. You still glue part 1 to part 2 to part 3 etc. Actually too a lot of kits have convoluted assembly instructions and if you are savvy you can make things easier by building up more natural sub assemblies.

3) I try to build as much of a kit up as possible and paint it as a unit. With an airbrush its not hard at all to reach behind parts, into restricted areas. If the model is largely the same color its not an issue at all. Again you get no benefit in painting 100 parts for the trailer one at a time, all dessert sand, and then gluing them together, versus building the bulk of the trailer and painting it as a unit. You get a much neater build this way without glue all over everything and parts looking "stuck on", mis matched colors, etc.

4) build a monster too. The original Aurora Forgotten Prisoner is up for a limited run reissue...

DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: April 25th, 2005, 12:47 am

June 27th, 2012, 10:12 pm #5

I guess I will go the sub-assemblies route.

Thanks again,
Owen
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Joined: April 25th, 2005, 12:47 am

June 29th, 2012, 4:09 am #6

I just finished construction on this kit. Leave it in sub assemblies! It will make painting much easier for you. I normally do build the entire kit first, but not on this one.
Dave
The M1070 gives you black rubber coated wire for the hoses. What is an easy way to remove some of the wire from inside the end so I can slip it over the nipples on the kit parts.
I initially thought the wire was just hollow tubing.

Owen
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Joined: April 25th, 2005, 12:47 am

June 29th, 2012, 4:11 am #7

I just finished construction on this kit. Leave it in sub assemblies! It will make painting much easier for you. I normally do build the entire kit first, but not on this one.
Dave
The M1070 gives you black rubber coated wire for the hoses. What is an easy way to remove some of the wire from inside the end so I can slip it over the nipples on the kit parts.
I initially thought the wire was just hollow tubing.

Owen
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Joined: November 28th, 2005, 7:50 am

June 29th, 2012, 10:25 am #8

Ok, try this, slide the coating up the wire a bit, as in trying to push it up on itself to expose the wire, then snip a bit of wire off, and tease the coating back down again, that should do what you want. You may need to start further up the wire than you think you need to too.
HTH, Shane

Just enough knowledge to be dangerous, but not enough to help anyone.
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

June 29th, 2012, 11:53 am #9

The idea of rubber tubes/wires seems good but in practice is always a pain. I remember the tubes in the old Esci 1/9 motorcycles as they were too thick and always looked like black rubber tubes. I would replace them with copper wire, solder, etc. and just drill out the holes for them. That way you can also vary the thickness of the plumbing, if necessary, position the lines in a more accurate way (rubber tube is springy and hard to glue) and paint it the appropriate color.

Otherwise you will have to try to pull the wire out from inside the coating
DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: November 28th, 2005, 7:50 am

June 29th, 2012, 9:20 pm #10

If I remember correctly, Malc cut the nipples off, drilled a hole and inserted the wire, coating and all, the supllied stuff in the kit looked good too. This was shown some time ago on the Constructive Comments forum, you may find his build if you do a search.
Also, try the modern forum for this question too.
Shane

Just enough knowledge to be dangerous, but not enough to help anyone.
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