Stripping a painted model...For what it's worth....

Hosted by Dave Parker from AFV Modeller magazine and Adam Wilder, this discussion group is geared towards modelling technique questions ranging from construction to final weathering. This forum was created so that "newbies" can post without being intimidated by the sometimes highly technical nature of the other discussion groups.

Stripping a painted model...For what it's worth....

Joined: April 18th, 2005, 2:48 pm

June 2nd, 2006, 5:49 pm #1

This might have been discussed before, but after my many years visiting this site, I cannot recall someone mentioning this. We've all been there before. You spend endless hours constructing the tank and you finally get around to painting it. Usually in the case of a camo scheme, when your finished, you stand back and say this looks like crap. This is when I say I'll just put it away in never-neverland and maybe strip the paint off and start over one day. My method of stripping has always been oven cleaner. Spray the stuff all over, let it sit, then wash it off under the kitchen sink, trying every possible precaution to catch the PE that comes off also. This results in basically starting all over re-attaching the PE. Well today, I found a method by chance that pleased me to no end. Instead of spraying the oven cleaner directly onto the model, I sprayed the cleaner into a container and dabbed it on all over with an old paintbrush in hopes it would not loosen the PE. Instead of using the kitchen sink and watching some parts go down the drain, I placed it in an old aluminum baking pan and planned on spraying the cleaner off with a Windex bottle filled with water. Then the idea hit me, I'll use my airbrush filled with water instead. Not only did it remove the oven cleaner, it also peeled back the paint and removed it like a high pressure hose would. Did not remove one piece of PE, and this tank was loaded with it. A happy old fart I am, and I'm ready to start the repaint. I know this was a lot to read, but I hope it helps some of you out there.
Best, Tom
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Joined: April 27th, 2005, 6:41 pm

June 2nd, 2006, 7:18 pm #2

though I would be careful with that aluminum pan because oven-cleaner and aluminum can react and dissolve the aluminum. Same reason aluminum items (barrels and such) should be removed when using oven cleaner. Apart from that I think it's a good idea. I'll give it a try.

Grtz Niels

http://groups.msn.com/dutchmodelbuilding
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Joined: August 2nd, 2005, 10:53 am

June 3rd, 2006, 9:50 am #3

This might have been discussed before, but after my many years visiting this site, I cannot recall someone mentioning this. We've all been there before. You spend endless hours constructing the tank and you finally get around to painting it. Usually in the case of a camo scheme, when your finished, you stand back and say this looks like crap. This is when I say I'll just put it away in never-neverland and maybe strip the paint off and start over one day. My method of stripping has always been oven cleaner. Spray the stuff all over, let it sit, then wash it off under the kitchen sink, trying every possible precaution to catch the PE that comes off also. This results in basically starting all over re-attaching the PE. Well today, I found a method by chance that pleased me to no end. Instead of spraying the oven cleaner directly onto the model, I sprayed the cleaner into a container and dabbed it on all over with an old paintbrush in hopes it would not loosen the PE. Instead of using the kitchen sink and watching some parts go down the drain, I placed it in an old aluminum baking pan and planned on spraying the cleaner off with a Windex bottle filled with water. Then the idea hit me, I'll use my airbrush filled with water instead. Not only did it remove the oven cleaner, it also peeled back the paint and removed it like a high pressure hose would. Did not remove one piece of PE, and this tank was loaded with it. A happy old fart I am, and I'm ready to start the repaint. I know this was a lot to read, but I hope it helps some of you out there.
Best, Tom
I found out at my expense that oven cleaner and aluminium barrel's don't mix!
Sound's like a good method Tom,being a bit of a perfectionist i find myself constantly stripping and respraying my model's and i used to use oven cleaner but since switching to acrylic's and finding out what a bottle of alcohol can do i've never looked back.
It's quicker,cleaner,do's not remove p/e etc. and is so easy to use just apply with cotton bud's,the paint just dissolve's like magic.
My latest project is a tank with big rotor blade's on it (shhhh) which is incorparating lot's of (got to be perfect) panel line join's which are best checked with a quick coat of paint then i remove the patche's of paint with my trusty alcohol and on i go.
I mention this because all i've done for the past month is spray,check join's then strip the paint off again and discovering alcohol (ha,ha) has made my life so much easier.
Regard's,Steve.
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Joined: November 30th, 2000, 8:54 pm

June 4th, 2006, 5:38 am #4

This might have been discussed before, but after my many years visiting this site, I cannot recall someone mentioning this. We've all been there before. You spend endless hours constructing the tank and you finally get around to painting it. Usually in the case of a camo scheme, when your finished, you stand back and say this looks like crap. This is when I say I'll just put it away in never-neverland and maybe strip the paint off and start over one day. My method of stripping has always been oven cleaner. Spray the stuff all over, let it sit, then wash it off under the kitchen sink, trying every possible precaution to catch the PE that comes off also. This results in basically starting all over re-attaching the PE. Well today, I found a method by chance that pleased me to no end. Instead of spraying the oven cleaner directly onto the model, I sprayed the cleaner into a container and dabbed it on all over with an old paintbrush in hopes it would not loosen the PE. Instead of using the kitchen sink and watching some parts go down the drain, I placed it in an old aluminum baking pan and planned on spraying the cleaner off with a Windex bottle filled with water. Then the idea hit me, I'll use my airbrush filled with water instead. Not only did it remove the oven cleaner, it also peeled back the paint and removed it like a high pressure hose would. Did not remove one piece of PE, and this tank was loaded with it. A happy old fart I am, and I'm ready to start the repaint. I know this was a lot to read, but I hope it helps some of you out there.
Best, Tom
Hi,
I tried a method to strip paint which worked very well -
Bath the model in a bath of cloth bleacher, and after a day or two the paint is removed. A little help from an old toothbrush and the model is almost striped. The only material the bleacher doesn't remove is cyano. It removed primer, acrylic paint and enamels.
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Joined: April 2nd, 2004, 1:34 am

July 19th, 2006, 2:09 am #5

This might have been discussed before, but after my many years visiting this site, I cannot recall someone mentioning this. We've all been there before. You spend endless hours constructing the tank and you finally get around to painting it. Usually in the case of a camo scheme, when your finished, you stand back and say this looks like crap. This is when I say I'll just put it away in never-neverland and maybe strip the paint off and start over one day. My method of stripping has always been oven cleaner. Spray the stuff all over, let it sit, then wash it off under the kitchen sink, trying every possible precaution to catch the PE that comes off also. This results in basically starting all over re-attaching the PE. Well today, I found a method by chance that pleased me to no end. Instead of spraying the oven cleaner directly onto the model, I sprayed the cleaner into a container and dabbed it on all over with an old paintbrush in hopes it would not loosen the PE. Instead of using the kitchen sink and watching some parts go down the drain, I placed it in an old aluminum baking pan and planned on spraying the cleaner off with a Windex bottle filled with water. Then the idea hit me, I'll use my airbrush filled with water instead. Not only did it remove the oven cleaner, it also peeled back the paint and removed it like a high pressure hose would. Did not remove one piece of PE, and this tank was loaded with it. A happy old fart I am, and I'm ready to start the repaint. I know this was a lot to read, but I hope it helps some of you out there.
Best, Tom
Just soak the model in brake fluid. It takes longer to dissolve enamel paint but it really works well.

Thanks,
Bill

http://www.itzproductions.com/

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