Sherbrooke Fusiliers "Bomb"

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Sherbrooke Fusiliers "Bomb"

Joined: January 7th, 2004, 5:17 pm

August 26th, 2011, 7:20 pm #1

I realise this topic has been brought up before, but I can't find anything to address the following questions:

For those of you who don't know, "Bomb" is the only Canadian Sherman to land on D-Day and make it to the end of the war. It was part of B squadron, Sherbrooke Fusiliers, of the 27th Armoured Regiment in the Canadian 2nd Armoured Brigade. The only pictures I have the show the front or sides, and the only markings I can see are the WD number - T152656, the name "Bomb" and a "CIII" on the transmission cover. I can't see any unit number, which would be a 53 on a red square with a white line along the bottom, nor can I see the brigade mark, which would be a black square with a horizontal blue line through the middle and a yellow maple leaf. I also don't see any squadron symbol, which would be a square for B squadron.

Does anyone have any information as to why this vehicle did not have any standard markings? Would the unit and brigade marks be on the rear only? What did the "CIII" represent?

Another question - although this vehicle has applique armour on the hull sides, it doesn't have anything over the driver/co driver hoods on the front, and it retains the original M34 mantlet without a shield over the coaxial machine gun. Since this was a DV tank the applique armour would have been added afterwards in the field, right? If so, why was the armour over the front hoods not installed, or the mantlet replaced? Seems odd.

Finally, since this vehicle soldiered on through Belgium and Holland, would it have had tracks welded to the hull and turret like most (if not all) Canadian Shermans?

------
Chuck Rothman
Former AMPS Webmaster
Former AMPS Boresight Editor
Now just a regular AMPS member
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Chuck Rothman
AMPS 2nd VP - Canada
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Joined: March 24th, 2005, 1:49 am

August 26th, 2011, 8:22 pm #2

Hi Chuck:

Didn't 1st Hussars' Holy Roller also land on D-Day and survive to the end of the war?

FYI, Holy Roller does have some marks on the turret that appear to be the remnants of welds where spare tracks were attached.

Cheers,

Scott

Scott Taylor
Thachweave Products
http://thachweave.tripod.com
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Joined: July 5th, 2006, 11:38 pm

August 26th, 2011, 11:38 pm #3

I realise this topic has been brought up before, but I can't find anything to address the following questions:

For those of you who don't know, "Bomb" is the only Canadian Sherman to land on D-Day and make it to the end of the war. It was part of B squadron, Sherbrooke Fusiliers, of the 27th Armoured Regiment in the Canadian 2nd Armoured Brigade. The only pictures I have the show the front or sides, and the only markings I can see are the WD number - T152656, the name "Bomb" and a "CIII" on the transmission cover. I can't see any unit number, which would be a 53 on a red square with a white line along the bottom, nor can I see the brigade mark, which would be a black square with a horizontal blue line through the middle and a yellow maple leaf. I also don't see any squadron symbol, which would be a square for B squadron.

Does anyone have any information as to why this vehicle did not have any standard markings? Would the unit and brigade marks be on the rear only? What did the "CIII" represent?

Another question - although this vehicle has applique armour on the hull sides, it doesn't have anything over the driver/co driver hoods on the front, and it retains the original M34 mantlet without a shield over the coaxial machine gun. Since this was a DV tank the applique armour would have been added afterwards in the field, right? If so, why was the armour over the front hoods not installed, or the mantlet replaced? Seems odd.

Finally, since this vehicle soldiered on through Belgium and Holland, would it have had tracks welded to the hull and turret like most (if not all) Canadian Shermans?

------
Chuck Rothman
Former AMPS Webmaster
Former AMPS Boresight Editor
Now just a regular AMPS member
...and the tank was a good deal of the way through the process of be refitted to be returned to stores. Any track welded on would have been removed and it is possible that this also resulted in (necessitated) the removal of the armour plates over the DV ports - or maybe not.

I would not read too much into the absence of markings at that late date - early in the campaign it would have been marked to standard (not doing so would be tantemount to mutiny.) In the photo to which you are referring, the finish is quite mottled and the tank cold easlily have been partially repainted to cover up the scars from the removed track welds.

Note that the "bomb" is rendered in chalk (as could be the CIII)and neither may have been present during hostilities.

Sorry have no idea what the CIII means.

Scott is correct - Holy Roller also survived the war.

Tom K
Last edited by Tom Kaszas on August 26th, 2011, 11:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 22nd, 2006, 3:15 am

August 27th, 2011, 12:01 am #4

I realise this topic has been brought up before, but I can't find anything to address the following questions:

For those of you who don't know, "Bomb" is the only Canadian Sherman to land on D-Day and make it to the end of the war. It was part of B squadron, Sherbrooke Fusiliers, of the 27th Armoured Regiment in the Canadian 2nd Armoured Brigade. The only pictures I have the show the front or sides, and the only markings I can see are the WD number - T152656, the name "Bomb" and a "CIII" on the transmission cover. I can't see any unit number, which would be a 53 on a red square with a white line along the bottom, nor can I see the brigade mark, which would be a black square with a horizontal blue line through the middle and a yellow maple leaf. I also don't see any squadron symbol, which would be a square for B squadron.

Does anyone have any information as to why this vehicle did not have any standard markings? Would the unit and brigade marks be on the rear only? What did the "CIII" represent?

Another question - although this vehicle has applique armour on the hull sides, it doesn't have anything over the driver/co driver hoods on the front, and it retains the original M34 mantlet without a shield over the coaxial machine gun. Since this was a DV tank the applique armour would have been added afterwards in the field, right? If so, why was the armour over the front hoods not installed, or the mantlet replaced? Seems odd.

Finally, since this vehicle soldiered on through Belgium and Holland, would it have had tracks welded to the hull and turret like most (if not all) Canadian Shermans?

------
Chuck Rothman
Former AMPS Webmaster
Former AMPS Boresight Editor
Now just a regular AMPS member
This is "BOMB" as it appeared in Falaise on 17 Aug 44. It shows many of its early features that were common to original issue SherFusR tanks

- Blue squadron sign infilled with a dark color on the rear turret storage box
- Large, light colored call sign
- Formation sign but no AoS sign
- 3 pieces of tubing welded on the hull sides
- Dark colored WD number and name on the side appliqué armor
- Allied star on the turret top

The blue squadron signs were probably also carried on the turret sides.

Note that the original number was 22. In July the Troops were reorganized, the Tp Cmdr gave up his Sherman Vc and took a Sherman III. During this reorganization "BOMB" got a new call sign of 21 and was a Tp Cmdr vehicle.

As for the appliqué armor, I don't believe the British/Canadian tanks received the same upgrades as the American tanks. Covering the ammunition bins was the extent of the upgrades.

I've always wanted to model "BOMB", but without a photograph showing the front and the layout of the track link armor, I think I would model it as it appeared in early June when the stowage and markings were more uniform throughout the regiment.







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