Roof shingles.

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Roof shingles.

Brian Tate
Brian Tate

April 26th, 2001, 10:35 am #1

I am working on a dio of a scene in a German city late in the war using Verlinden's City Corner House set. I have scratchbuilt 2 sets of floor/ceilings and am now considering trying to make a ruined section of roof for the building. Seems to me that most European buildings of this period had shingles for the roofing material. So can anyone suggest an easy (I am lazy!) way of making realistic looking shingles. I thought of wooden ice block (popsicle) sticks but these look a little thick for scale. Thanks for any help.
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Joined: February 5th, 2001, 8:50 pm

April 26th, 2001, 7:17 pm #2

You should use Balsa wood... There's easy to cut, really thin AND cheap to buy.

Fred
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Mike Danielson
Mike Danielson

April 26th, 2001, 7:19 pm #3

I am working on a dio of a scene in a German city late in the war using Verlinden's City Corner House set. I have scratchbuilt 2 sets of floor/ceilings and am now considering trying to make a ruined section of roof for the building. Seems to me that most European buildings of this period had shingles for the roofing material. So can anyone suggest an easy (I am lazy!) way of making realistic looking shingles. I thought of wooden ice block (popsicle) sticks but these look a little thick for scale. Thanks for any help.
u can try using real shingles it might work i dono just an idea,


Mike
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Ed Gilbert
Ed Gilbert

April 26th, 2001, 11:31 pm #4

I am working on a dio of a scene in a German city late in the war using Verlinden's City Corner House set. I have scratchbuilt 2 sets of floor/ceilings and am now considering trying to make a ruined section of roof for the building. Seems to me that most European buildings of this period had shingles for the roofing material. So can anyone suggest an easy (I am lazy!) way of making realistic looking shingles. I thought of wooden ice block (popsicle) sticks but these look a little thick for scale. Thanks for any help.
Permanent urban buildings would have used hand-split slate, not wood, for durability. Try using some thick plastic sheet, rough it with coarse sandpaper then brush it with liquid cemnt to smooth it out a little. This will replicate the split stone texture. Carve into rectangles and lay as you would wooden shingles. Paint dark gray, with rusty wash and lighter gray drybrushing to highlight the texture.
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Jens O. Mehner
Jens O. Mehner

April 26th, 2001, 11:49 pm #5

I am working on a dio of a scene in a German city late in the war using Verlinden's City Corner House set. I have scratchbuilt 2 sets of floor/ceilings and am now considering trying to make a ruined section of roof for the building. Seems to me that most European buildings of this period had shingles for the roofing material. So can anyone suggest an easy (I am lazy!) way of making realistic looking shingles. I thought of wooden ice block (popsicle) sticks but these look a little thick for scale. Thanks for any help.
As a German, I feel I should add my two cent's worth here since there seems to be a certain misconception about roofing materials used over here.

Actually, in most parts of the country you saw and still see roofing tiles, the ones with one side rounded off, one row neatly overlaying the other by a margin, mostly reddish or dark brown type- you could either cut these from sheet stock or check the model railroad department of your local hobby shop- gauge I should be fine for 1/35 scale, 0 gauge for 1/48, and 1/87 or H0 gauge works for 1/76 although a tad bit too small. Come to think of it, I seem to remember that Verlinden used to have a set of roofing tiles in 1/35 scale, you might want to check the VLS website.

Nevertheless, Ed makes a valid point, since in some parts of the country, slate is predominantly used- not only for roofing but also as an outside wall insulation or decoration- it always depends on what was available locally and easy or cheap to get.

As for shingles, they have been used to roof the occasional wooden hut or shed but apart from the Black Forest, their use as a roofing material for larger buildings has been very limited in the past 200 years, also owing to municipal fire ordinances- old, dry shingles have a tendency to burn veeeery easily.

Well, I better sign off before I start to sound like an anorak and bore the skin off everybody's skull,I have gotten into this more deeply than I intended to- sorry.

HTH

Jens O.
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Brian Tate
Brian Tate

April 27th, 2001, 9:12 am #6

Thanks guys and particularly you Jens. Valid points about wooden shingles not being very durable and that slate would be the more popular material. While searching through my Alladin's Cave of spares etc., I found some medium thick cardboard and have made up a section of `shingles' from this to see how it looks. Haven't painted and weathered them yet but in their raw state they look to be OK but the proof of the pudding will be in the painting... or something like that! Living `down under' here in Oz, we don't see all that many shingle roofs, mostly tile and corrugated roofing iron here, so this is unknown territory for me. So thanks again. Oh, another question, can anyone steer me onto a site that has photos of wrecked buildings, particularly urban in Germany, from WW2 please? Looking at where plumbing and wiring might have gone.
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Jens O. Mehner
Jens O. Mehner

April 27th, 2001, 4:23 pm #7

I will check during the weekend and if I find anything, I will post it here.

HTH

Jens O.
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Ed Gilbert
Ed Gilbert

April 28th, 2001, 3:53 am #8

I am working on a dio of a scene in a German city late in the war using Verlinden's City Corner House set. I have scratchbuilt 2 sets of floor/ceilings and am now considering trying to make a ruined section of roof for the building. Seems to me that most European buildings of this period had shingles for the roofing material. So can anyone suggest an easy (I am lazy!) way of making realistic looking shingles. I thought of wooden ice block (popsicle) sticks but these look a little thick for scale. Thanks for any help.
One reason I suggested slate roofing is that this was to be wreckage of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century buildings destroyed in the 1940s. This would be a period when Europe still had a (labor intensive) slate-quarrying and splitting industry, as opposed to the later ceramic (energy intensive) roofing 'slates'. In your rubble, remember that the slates do not burn.

Wiring would not have been the modern insulated type, as there was no common use of plastics, and the rubber was not durable enough to last for decades inside a wall. One common type was spool and line. Round ceramic insulators were nailed to the inside of a wall, and uninsulated wire was run by wrapping it around the spools. The exposed wires were then safely enclosed inside the hollow wall. The closest modern equivalent in America is an electric livestock fence.

Some period buildings may not have had indoor plumbing. Expensive public buildings would have commonly had it, but perhaps not houses (even apartment buildings in low-income worker housing). Some may have had additions that included the plumbing as an add-on, kind of like a stairwell added to the outside.
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Brian Tate
Brian Tate

April 28th, 2001, 11:40 pm #9

I will check during the weekend and if I find anything, I will post it here.

HTH

Jens O.
Thanks again Jens, I will wait to see what you can find out. Brian.
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Brian tate
Brian tate

April 28th, 2001, 11:47 pm #10

One reason I suggested slate roofing is that this was to be wreckage of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century buildings destroyed in the 1940s. This would be a period when Europe still had a (labor intensive) slate-quarrying and splitting industry, as opposed to the later ceramic (energy intensive) roofing 'slates'. In your rubble, remember that the slates do not burn.

Wiring would not have been the modern insulated type, as there was no common use of plastics, and the rubber was not durable enough to last for decades inside a wall. One common type was spool and line. Round ceramic insulators were nailed to the inside of a wall, and uninsulated wire was run by wrapping it around the spools. The exposed wires were then safely enclosed inside the hollow wall. The closest modern equivalent in America is an electric livestock fence.

Some period buildings may not have had indoor plumbing. Expensive public buildings would have commonly had it, but perhaps not houses (even apartment buildings in low-income worker housing). Some may have had additions that included the plumbing as an add-on, kind of like a stairwell added to the outside.
G'day Ed,

Thanks once again. The points you make are very good and certainly changed some of the ideas I had about wiring in particular. I recently grabbed a set of Hudson & Allen's plumbing and this includes some nice bits and pieces including plumbing junctions, stop cocks etc. I have made up a section of plumbing using a H&A junction piece and solder and this looks convincing. I think I will just put this hanging out of the cavity between a floor/ceiling section; would that be right? By the way, the `cardboard' slate shingles look very realistic and I haven't even pained them yet. Thanks again.
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