Question about working with Milliput

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Question about working with Milliput

Joined: May 26th, 2004, 1:08 am

June 24th, 2006, 1:24 am #1

I've tried working with Milliput before, and working with it isn't the problem--it's mixing it. I hate grinding it into my skin using bare fingers, but it sticks to gloves even worse. I've thought about using liberal amounts of talc to keep it from sticking, but I wonder if working the too much talc into the putty wouldn't weaken it.

Does anyone have suggestions about how to work with Milliput so that you don't wind up with white fingers smelling of resin for a day afterward?
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Joined: March 31st, 2006, 3:36 am

June 30th, 2006, 8:54 pm #2

and dip as needed, then wipe my hands off on an old rag or paper towel. I love (well, like alot) Milliput and especially like that I can fine-shape it with a wet brush. It's well worth a little hand cleaning to me, but I have found no other way to stay clean using it!
-Tim
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Joined: May 26th, 2004, 1:08 am

July 4th, 2006, 1:50 am #3

Thanks for the reply. Do you find that it weakens the putty at all if you knead a lot of water into it while mixing?
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Joined: March 31st, 2006, 3:36 am

July 20th, 2006, 11:27 pm #4

sorry to respond so late, I hadn't checked. I always use MP full strength and only shape the outer area with a wet brush. I do sometimes drill holes for extra bite if I am using alot of MP between 2 parts, i.e. - it is almost acting as a glue.
Take care,
-Tim
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Joined: March 7th, 2006, 6:05 pm

July 30th, 2006, 9:48 pm #5

I've tried working with Milliput before, and working with it isn't the problem--it's mixing it. I hate grinding it into my skin using bare fingers, but it sticks to gloves even worse. I've thought about using liberal amounts of talc to keep it from sticking, but I wonder if working the too much talc into the putty wouldn't weaken it.

Does anyone have suggestions about how to work with Milliput so that you don't wind up with white fingers smelling of resin for a day afterward?
I've done a lot of work with epoxy putty in making tarps, modifying larger scale figures and their clothing and so forth. I've used Milliput in the past though I mainly use A & B now because it's much more economical and I like the texture better (not so gritty). I would second the thought of having a bowl of water and a cloth nearby to wipe the hands. In my experience you can get an inordinate amount of just about anything mixed in with epoxy putties and they'll still cure as hard as a rock. An example of this is the amount of goop I mix into the epoxy putty when I'm making tarps to go on the back of vehicles.

Generally, when I make tarps I mix a dark oil paint in with the putty (olive drab, dark gray, whatever) so that I don't have to get into every nook and cranny for that final painting once the tarp is conformed to the vehicle or whatever else it's draped over. The down-side here is that the oil paint makes the putty even stickier to handle. In forming the tarps I use petroleum jelly instead of talc. I spread a layer of petroleum jelly over a sheet of glass and roll the putty out into a thin sheet with a hard rubber roller called a printer's brayer liberally covered with petroleum jelly too (you can get printer's brayers of various sizes in any commercial art store in the print making supply section). After the sheet of putty is thin enough (and you can roll it out pretty thin), I let it sit for a while until it gets to a slightly leathery consistency. At this point I cut the tarps to size and fold and (or) roll them to whatever shape is needed to get the effect I want. The putty is still workable at this point and remains so for quite a while. You can brush the surface smooth with water or alcohol and can work in wrinkles, creases, texture, stitching, seams, and so forth with various implements (hand made or store bought... you'll find all sorts of goodies at model railroad shows). Get the tarp (sleeve, cape, whatever) placed the way you want it before the putty sets because after it does the only way you'll change it is by filing, drilling, or carving (it sets rock hard in about 24 hours).

My point, if there is one, is that with all that goop mixed in with it, the stuff still sets fine, paints fine, barely shrinks... amazing stuff that every modeler should play with and get to know. (It was actually developed for emergency plumbing repairs, so that may explain its immunity to contamination and its ability to cure even under water). Good luck with your project. Chuck

It's hard to remember that the object was to finish the model when you have both hands superglued to your forehead.
Last edited by Zouave146 on July 31st, 2006, 7:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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