Puzzle

The Figures discussion group is hosted by Mark Bannerman and is dedicated to modelling military figures of any scale and era.

Puzzle

Joined: August 6th, 2004, 9:24 pm

October 27th, 2010, 2:38 pm #1

I made some mistake and did a double post of the Dr. Strangelove message. Since there is nothing I can do to remove it, but I can edit everything, I've changed it to a riddle.

Why is this ship noteworth in the history of the war? (I know a man who was on this ship one Christmas Eve and he remembers it quite well.)

Last edited by J.Clifford on October 27th, 2010, 2:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 4th, 2001, 1:33 am

October 27th, 2010, 4:18 pm #2

Cliff,
I'm game i believe this to be the Leopoldville sunk off Cherbourg during Christmas eve. Large loss of life. American troop ship. Clive Cussler found it in a search. I'll check when i get home from work to see if i was correct. Brock
Last edited by PBHIII on October 28th, 2010, 12:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 22nd, 2005, 4:32 am

October 27th, 2010, 9:52 pm #3

I made some mistake and did a double post of the Dr. Strangelove message. Since there is nothing I can do to remove it, but I can edit everything, I've changed it to a riddle.

Why is this ship noteworth in the history of the war? (I know a man who was on this ship one Christmas Eve and he remembers it quite well.)

and that guy you know was one of the lucky ones!

Regards,
Gary D.
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Joined: November 4th, 2001, 1:33 am

October 28th, 2010, 1:03 am #4

Last edited by PBHIII on October 28th, 2010, 1:12 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 6th, 2004, 9:24 pm

October 29th, 2010, 9:08 pm #5

I made some mistake and did a double post of the Dr. Strangelove message. Since there is nothing I can do to remove it, but I can edit everything, I've changed it to a riddle.

Why is this ship noteworth in the history of the war? (I know a man who was on this ship one Christmas Eve and he remembers it quite well.)

My wife and I are friends with a woman who's father was on the ship. The first time I had heard of this was when she talked about her "daddy" and some of his friends from the war who got together to remember the night the ship was sunk. His rescue is mentioned specifically in "A Night Before Christmas" which was published in 1963, an interesting read considering that at that point in time the whole incident was still being denied.


I have had the pleasure of worshipping with him on Christmas eve several time since we first met his daughter. When I told him that I had read the book, he became quite friendly and talkative. I think that having someone come up to him and mention that they knew that he had been through an ordeal like that made him feel that he had found a sympathetic ear, as indeed he had. It is well known that a lot of soldiers didn't talk about the war because EVERYONE had been through it and the general feeling was that no man was more special than anyone else, everyone had gone through it. But imagine being Mr. Davies and not only feeling like no one wanted to hear, but that he wasn't supposed to talk about it, either.


Mr. Davies was a pharmacist after the war. He remained in good health until last Christmas tide, when he had a stroke and the docs thought he was not going to make it. But he rallied and got over it pretty much, and other than his eyesight in one eye being affected, he's independent again.


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Joined: November 4th, 2001, 1:33 am

October 29th, 2010, 11:14 pm #6

Cliff I didn't even notice the name well my eyes must be going. He was very lucky. It's a real sheme they tried to cover this up. Brock
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Joined: August 6th, 2004, 9:24 pm

November 4th, 2010, 4:08 pm #7

There were three responses for responsibility decades later. One from the U.S. Army, one from the British Navy and one from Belgium, I think it was the owners of the ship in particular.
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