Pin Wash?

Hosted by Dave Parker from AFV Modeller magazine and Adam Wilder, this discussion group is geared towards modelling technique questions ranging from construction to final weathering. This forum was created so that "newbies" can post without being intimidated by the sometimes highly technical nature of the other discussion groups.

Pin Wash?

Joined: July 16th, 2006, 12:47 am

January 26th, 2007, 12:39 am #1

Howdy. Pretty new to modeling again after 30 years of growing up. I have been reading a lot and am now seeing folks mention a "pin wash". What exactly is this? I just tried my first "wash" and it made the entire model look really bad. I guess I totally screwed up. I thought it was just supposed to go into the cracks, holes and such? It made the entire model a differant color. Any suggestions? Thanks much for any advice. As an FYI I took artist oil paint (burnt or raw umber) and turpenoid and thinned it down to make the wash. I had read about doing this but it turned my yellow panther into a dark brown panther.
Last edited by backdraft57 on January 26th, 2007, 2:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 12th, 2006, 5:48 am

January 26th, 2007, 3:43 am #2

I though this only happened to me!!
How nice to find out I'm REALLY not the only one.
But, by many times of this I found the solution.
1. after your finished painting your base coats or camo clear coat with flat or semi gloss.
So your color will not get burn or colored by your wash.
2.your wash was to thick.(not being mean, but from my past.)
you want your wash to be more like dirty thinner than paint.
(I do about an 80-85% thinner to about 20-15% paint)
I have really hand the best luck with oils to use cheap hardware store
paint thinner.
it's mineral sprit based.
I have tried everything including artist thinners at 7-8 dollars.
3. do several light washes compared to one large wash.
let each one dry about 15-20 min.
then VERY lightly drybrush off excess.
4. then clear coat one last time.
Hope I helped you
Jim
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Joined: August 30th, 2006, 7:44 pm

January 26th, 2007, 7:12 am #3

Howdy. Pretty new to modeling again after 30 years of growing up. I have been reading a lot and am now seeing folks mention a "pin wash". What exactly is this? I just tried my first "wash" and it made the entire model look really bad. I guess I totally screwed up. I thought it was just supposed to go into the cracks, holes and such? It made the entire model a differant color. Any suggestions? Thanks much for any advice. As an FYI I took artist oil paint (burnt or raw umber) and turpenoid and thinned it down to make the wash. I had read about doing this but it turned my yellow panther into a dark brown panther.
Suggestions given here are perfect ways to get your wash correct. However, I'm new to 1/35 modelling myself but I'm also confused as to the difference between a wash and an pin wash - is there a difference?

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Joined: September 12th, 2005, 11:37 am

January 26th, 2007, 12:10 pm #4

Sometimes the terms seem interchangable and I don't know if an International Standard of Modelling has been formed yet to define terms. But Generally it seems that a "wash" is where the whole or large parts of a model are painted with a very thin mix of solvent and paint medium. A "pin wash" is often where a highly thinned mix (but sometimes thicker but nowhere near normal paint thickness), is applied to raised details or panel lines and this fills very thin gaps or highlights just round the edge of a detail, by cappillary attr/action. The paint is often applied from a very fine brush or pin. I believe a pin-wash as I've described is better if applied to a gloss coated model, particularly as it can be wiped off easily if it spreads too far or anything. A wash as described is better applied to matt finished paint jobs to give a broader even covering, though usually it will concentrate on edges and in panel lines.

You can also combine both by washing the whole model in neat solvent and then touching details with a mix of paint and thinner, this highlights the detail but will also fade into the panels.

Often both ways result in similar effects, but they can be quite different.

There is also a confusion with the term filters, for which I've seen a couple of definitions. Though in general filter often means applying a fine layer of thinned pigment over a painted surface to somehow change it's appearance, sometimes at almost homeopathic concentrations.
Last edited by RossJarvis on January 26th, 2007, 12:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 6th, 2006, 9:14 am

January 26th, 2007, 9:10 pm #5

Hi all!

Good idea about coating the hole model with an glossy coat beforehand washing it! I had just the same troubles as you had but ended up with only applying tin washes (or as we German modelling-nerds call it: a detail wash). Why did I never think about using gloss clear instead. scratching head

I tend to use my version of filtering instead to break the monotone flat surfaces of the model (due to lack of alternatives ). Therefore I dab VERY small spots of oilcolor on the surface. Next thing I do is to dilute the spot with an clean brush dipped in thinner. You can use lots of different colors (brown, rust, yellow, white, black) because all what is left of the spot will be a hint of it. When I do my way of filtering I think: "Well, where did the crew left mud from their shoes?" (thats where I do brown spots) and "What will it look like after a rain?" (thats when I dillute them).
Dunno if you can also use pigments for filtering?

My two cents.
Hope this helps!

OLF
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Joined: September 6th, 2002, 2:07 pm

January 27th, 2007, 1:02 am #6

Howdy. Pretty new to modeling again after 30 years of growing up. I have been reading a lot and am now seeing folks mention a "pin wash". What exactly is this? I just tried my first "wash" and it made the entire model look really bad. I guess I totally screwed up. I thought it was just supposed to go into the cracks, holes and such? It made the entire model a differant color. Any suggestions? Thanks much for any advice. As an FYI I took artist oil paint (burnt or raw umber) and turpenoid and thinned it down to make the wash. I had read about doing this but it turned my yellow panther into a dark brown panther.
I think the terms might get people confused as they are used differently in different parts of the world. One book that I would reccomend is Mig's FAQ book. It covers a full range of finishing techniques. I picked mine up off of Amazon.

Jim Guld
Cheers
Jim Guld
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Joined: July 16th, 2006, 12:47 am

January 27th, 2007, 1:33 am #7

Howdy. Pretty new to modeling again after 30 years of growing up. I have been reading a lot and am now seeing folks mention a "pin wash". What exactly is this? I just tried my first "wash" and it made the entire model look really bad. I guess I totally screwed up. I thought it was just supposed to go into the cracks, holes and such? It made the entire model a differant color. Any suggestions? Thanks much for any advice. As an FYI I took artist oil paint (burnt or raw umber) and turpenoid and thinned it down to make the wash. I had read about doing this but it turned my yellow panther into a dark brown panther.
Folks, Thanks for the advice. I have been working on stipping the paint and have it partially repainted. Once done I will try the coat first before the wash and make sure I have it thinned down more. Thanks again.
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