Pin Wash Questions

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Pin Wash Questions

Joined: March 9th, 2005, 2:11 am

November 25th, 2017, 11:09 pm #1

I always end up with an obvious "stain" any time i try to pin wash around a raised bolt, hatch etc. Then i use a soft brush with clean thinner to try to remove it and i end up with an even bigger "stain." I use Weber Turpenoid and Winsor Newton oils. Anything out there better? Any suggestions? Should i have a gloss coat over the base colors? Should i try the MIG and AMMO products? I'm just ready to try something different. Thanks guys.
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Joined: January 31st, 2009, 1:06 am

November 25th, 2017, 11:38 pm #2

Ordinary mineral spirits to thin the paint and make the wash instead of the Terpenoid. Also try just using mineral sprits in your damp brush to clean up the tide marks. You might also try pre-wetting the area with mineral spirits which can mitigate how far the wash spreads, limiting the size of the tide marks.

FWIW, it sounds to me like you're using the more or less accepted technique - apply the pin wash, then use a slightly damp / moist clean brush to clean up the tide marks. You should get good results just using the "old school" materials - oil paint and mieral spirits.

I don't use Terpenoid to make my washes, just ordinary, hardware store odorless paint thinner (mineral spirits). The tide marks are result of the binder (linseed oil, walnut oil, etc.) and some of the pigments left behind as the thinners dry out from the edges of the wash. The Turpenoid might contribute to this by leaving behind the turpentine and oil that it contains.

The mineral spirits, on the other hand, pretty much evaporate completely, so what ever that's left behind to make tide marks is from the paint, itself. In my experience, mineral spirits will remove whatever there from the paint.

I know a lot of guys gloss coat before they do their washes, but I've never done that. I just apply my washes over the flat / matt paints. Pre-wetting may be the key here, and I always do that.

Finally, be sure to not leave the tide marks too long before cleaning them away. I get better results working in a fairly small area and cleaning the tide marks up before moving to another area. If the tide marks are allowed to dry too long (like overnight), they can be more difficult to remove.
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Joined: February 3rd, 2001, 3:35 am

November 26th, 2017, 12:29 am #3

I always end up with an obvious "stain" any time i try to pin wash around a raised bolt, hatch etc. Then i use a soft brush with clean thinner to try to remove it and i end up with an even bigger "stain." I use Weber Turpenoid and Winsor Newton oils. Anything out there better? Any suggestions? Should i have a gloss coat over the base colors? Should i try the MIG and AMMO products? I'm just ready to try something different. Thanks guys.
That I get better results with pin washes on a gloss coat. With a gloss coat the pin wash takes less to flow around the object and it does not affect the color of the base paint. It's a pain having to gloss coat a kit that doesn't need decals but it's what works for me.
Eric
There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.

Calvin and Hobbs 1990
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Joined: April 6th, 2010, 8:25 pm

November 26th, 2017, 10:07 am #4

I always end up with an obvious "stain" any time i try to pin wash around a raised bolt, hatch etc. Then i use a soft brush with clean thinner to try to remove it and i end up with an even bigger "stain." I use Weber Turpenoid and Winsor Newton oils. Anything out there better? Any suggestions? Should i have a gloss coat over the base colors? Should i try the MIG and AMMO products? I'm just ready to try something different. Thanks guys.
As Mike suggested, one way around this is to dampen the panel(s) with the 'carrier' before applying the pin wash. I don't gloss my vehicles prior to application as I prefer to work directly onto the matt paint (almost always Tamiya acrylics in my case). Dampen the surface first and then apply the pin wash to the features you want to emphasise. There is much less chance of leaving tide marks on the completed model. I tend to work on two or three panels at a time since the carrier evaporates quite quickly (it's not unusual for me to reapply the carrier base layer more than once during the process).

I have to use household low odour white spirit rather than standard turpentine as my carrier because of my domestic circumstances. My other half suffers from asthma, so high odour modelling potions - glues, paints, washes etc - can cause her to have an attack. Trying out a completely new modelling product can therefore be something of a lottery!

Regards,
John
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Joined: March 9th, 2005, 2:11 am

November 27th, 2017, 4:32 pm #5

I always end up with an obvious "stain" any time i try to pin wash around a raised bolt, hatch etc. Then i use a soft brush with clean thinner to try to remove it and i end up with an even bigger "stain." I use Weber Turpenoid and Winsor Newton oils. Anything out there better? Any suggestions? Should i have a gloss coat over the base colors? Should i try the MIG and AMMO products? I'm just ready to try something different. Thanks guys.
Mike, Eric and John. Thanks for the advice. Headed to the hardware store today.
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Joined: January 24th, 2004, 5:25 am

December 6th, 2017, 3:35 am #6

I always end up with an obvious "stain" any time i try to pin wash around a raised bolt, hatch etc. Then i use a soft brush with clean thinner to try to remove it and i end up with an even bigger "stain." I use Weber Turpenoid and Winsor Newton oils. Anything out there better? Any suggestions? Should i have a gloss coat over the base colors? Should i try the MIG and AMMO products? I'm just ready to try something different. Thanks guys.
Hi Paul,

And the quantity of pin wash being applied. In truth, if you're seeing tide marks, then you are applying too much liquid to the surface. The whole wipe it off afterward is a complete waste of time if you stop to realize what is actually happening.

Rather, use a sharp fine tip brush, I love #2 round ones, and then learn to unload the wash on a paper towel prior to application. Control and precision will create a superior effect with much greater efficiency, and better overall results. You should have no issue with oils, there is no need to switch to enamels for this step.

The whole matte/gloss what do I do conversation becomes rather mute at that point.
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Joined: March 9th, 2005, 2:11 am

December 7th, 2017, 4:15 pm #7

My wife and i were walking along the strand in Folkestone/Euromilitaire and i see my old friend Rhodes Williams coming towards us. You were with him and he introduced you to my wife and I. Small world. Thanks for the advice.
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