Photos of APG's Mk.IV "Female"

Hosted by Francois Gousse this discussion group is dedicated to AFV's of the First World War from all countries as well as tank development during the 1920s and 1930s.

Photos of APG's Mk.IV "Female"

Joined: September 16th, 2005, 7:20 pm

December 29th, 2007, 1:39 am #1

Thinking of starting Emhar's Male, I ordered Osprey's title, but until that arrives I thought I would pay this one a visit. With large cracks appearing, this AFV is actually falling apart. Last time I was at APG the access hatches were open (welded shut now) for what I will have to assume was an examination by the curator for the purpose of restoration. Judging by the size of the cracks it seems that trying to drag it onto a hauler will just finish the separation process... nonetheless it is the only Mk.IV that I can photograph so I thought I would at least share photos of what is left of it.

Since I don't plan on making any modifications (other than adding resin tracks to) Emhar's kit these are more for inspiration than reference; however, for those really putting an effort into this kit here are a few photos for your arsenal.

The lack of industry news makes this a slow moving board, so it is unlikely that I will keep these photos in photobucket for too long.











Rear Sprocket (below)














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Joined: September 27th, 2004, 11:44 am

December 29th, 2007, 5:35 am #2

I really appreciate your postings of your walkarounds. But this vehicle is breaking my heart!
Thankfully it isn't the only remaining Mk IV Female unlike some of the other unique examples at Aberdeen.
Still, it's painful to see the deterioration in such an exhibit. I don't know how they would go trying to move her now.
What does concern me is the condition of the T1 Medium which would be as equally thinly armoured and nearly as old!
It's examples like that, and say the Skeleton tank which are significant to American AFV evolution and are also the only examples of their kind which really need to be preserved.
Then there's the St Chamond SPG as well as some of the Italian SPG's that are also the only survivors.
Sigh!
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 7:20 pm

December 29th, 2007, 1:59 pm #3

I was going to say that is the price of being the popularity contest loser, but the the Pz.III. IV and V are in worse shape after the harebrained “cut-out” display attempt. I know the workshop does have some stuff stored away (perhaps waiting on funding for a display building?), but like most of us I am too comfortable in my narrow life (and too cynical about the process) to be an activist for (or against) anything. I am simply happy to be able to photograph it for my own use and for those of us who can’t get to APG themselves.
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Joined: September 27th, 2004, 11:44 am

December 29th, 2007, 10:53 pm #4

I guess it's easy to see the solution without taking into context the cost, resources and time and care needed.
Aberdeen has a LOT of exhibits and to give them all the TLC we modellers would like to see is unrealistic.
I personally would just like to see that the more rarer subjects get taken care of now before they are lost.

At the end of the day though, I appreciate your efforts to get there and photograph them for all of us. It is a very generous thing for you to do.
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Joined: March 15th, 2004, 2:16 am

December 29th, 2007, 11:36 pm #5

...way back when; the late 50s, early 60s, many German WW2 vehicles were housed indoors; those that had been cut out ranging from the PzI to the Tiger. There are many pics of these early displays.

It is doubtful they can move the Mk IV without destroying it. ( Fortunately both French vehicles were acquired by the French representatives of Sumaur a few years ago; one of which is now a runner. )
Why hasn't there been a genuine effort to save these vehicles & guns ? The truth is brutally simple; Aberdeen was an ordnance depot and testiang facility. Enemy weapons were tested, disected, and disposed of. Military authorities let precious little of appropriations trickle out for sheltering these items, much less restoration.

Virtually all of the Great War collection was obliterated in the 1954 Korean War "scrap drive". (This included the only remaining example of the 42cm "Dicke Bertha".) Walk the park, and you will find only two WW1 era artillerie pieces; and these survived only because the officer in charge thought they were of WW2 vintage.
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Joined: October 23rd, 2003, 7:05 pm

December 30th, 2007, 11:31 am #6

Thinking of starting Emhar's Male, I ordered Osprey's title, but until that arrives I thought I would pay this one a visit. With large cracks appearing, this AFV is actually falling apart. Last time I was at APG the access hatches were open (welded shut now) for what I will have to assume was an examination by the curator for the purpose of restoration. Judging by the size of the cracks it seems that trying to drag it onto a hauler will just finish the separation process... nonetheless it is the only Mk.IV that I can photograph so I thought I would at least share photos of what is left of it.

Since I don't plan on making any modifications (other than adding resin tracks to) Emhar's kit these are more for inspiration than reference; however, for those really putting an effort into this kit here are a few photos for your arsenal.

The lack of industry news makes this a slow moving board, so it is unlikely that I will keep these photos in photobucket for too long.











Rear Sprocket (below)













I suppose the Whippet is no better?
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 7:20 pm

December 30th, 2007, 7:22 pm #7

...way back when; the late 50s, early 60s, many German WW2 vehicles were housed indoors; those that had been cut out ranging from the PzI to the Tiger. There are many pics of these early displays.

It is doubtful they can move the Mk IV without destroying it. ( Fortunately both French vehicles were acquired by the French representatives of Sumaur a few years ago; one of which is now a runner. )
Why hasn't there been a genuine effort to save these vehicles & guns ? The truth is brutally simple; Aberdeen was an ordnance depot and testiang facility. Enemy weapons were tested, disected, and disposed of. Military authorities let precious little of appropriations trickle out for sheltering these items, much less restoration.

Virtually all of the Great War collection was obliterated in the 1954 Korean War "scrap drive". (This included the only remaining example of the 42cm "Dicke Bertha".) Walk the park, and you will find only two WW1 era artillerie pieces; and these survived only because the officer in charge thought they were of WW2 vintage.
This photo showing a Korean war scrap drive was (for me) originally posted over on com-central.net Although it just looks like a lot of T-34/85s...


... in the back ground is something else all together.

As far as I know this Pz.III mineroller did not survive.
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Joined: February 20th, 2003, 12:29 am

December 30th, 2007, 10:40 pm #8

Thinking of starting Emhar's Male, I ordered Osprey's title, but until that arrives I thought I would pay this one a visit. With large cracks appearing, this AFV is actually falling apart. Last time I was at APG the access hatches were open (welded shut now) for what I will have to assume was an examination by the curator for the purpose of restoration. Judging by the size of the cracks it seems that trying to drag it onto a hauler will just finish the separation process... nonetheless it is the only Mk.IV that I can photograph so I thought I would at least share photos of what is left of it.

Since I don't plan on making any modifications (other than adding resin tracks to) Emhar's kit these are more for inspiration than reference; however, for those really putting an effort into this kit here are a few photos for your arsenal.

The lack of industry news makes this a slow moving board, so it is unlikely that I will keep these photos in photobucket for too long.











Rear Sprocket (below)













Thanks James for the effort you went to to post these photos for the rest of us. It's the first time I've seen a good shot of the sloping plate in the rear.
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