Photo quality/Armored Attack by Zaloga

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Hosted by John Prigent and Steve Zaloga, this is a discussion group dedicated to the armoured forces of the many Allied nations of the Second World War.

Photo quality/Armored Attack by Zaloga

Joined: August 3rd, 2005, 6:52 pm

January 17th, 2012, 10:01 am #1

How's the photo reproduction quality in the above book? Amazon.com reviews seem to vary...
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Joined: September 22nd, 2005, 2:02 pm

January 17th, 2012, 10:29 am #2

...I think it's a great book and worth having. Some have crticised the photo quality, but I think that they are being a tad picky.

I'm gald that I've added a copy to my collection and alreday have "Armored Victory" on order.

Robet Price
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Joined: July 8th, 2005, 9:49 pm

January 17th, 2012, 10:48 am #3

How's the photo reproduction quality in the above book? Amazon.com reviews seem to vary...
Hi !
This book gives a great range of US and even some interesting german armour pics for the period.
It's a cheap book for what it offers.
Yes, one can be frustrated with the average quality pic. It is easy to notice it with well known pics that you can find in the book.
But the interest of that book is somewhere else.

Highly recommanded !

Eric
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Joined: November 8th, 2003, 4:32 am

January 17th, 2012, 4:34 pm #4

How's the photo reproduction quality in the above book? Amazon.com reviews seem to vary...
What I mean, is you aren't buying a book that is specific to one vehicle or type. This book is more of an overview of all types in the theatre for a specific time period.

If you are looking for markings, diorama ideas, and GOBS of history, this book is fantastic.

If you are buying it for great big, page size photos of a specific vehicle, this isn't the best book for you.

I think it is the best value in a book that I have found in a long time. Get it!

Scott Gentry
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Joined: January 31st, 2009, 1:06 am

January 17th, 2012, 4:37 pm #5

How's the photo reproduction quality in the above book? Amazon.com reviews seem to vary...
however, IMO, the book is an excelent value. In regards to image quality, the photos that are of marginal quality (as opposed to excellent quality) are a small portion of the whole. The book has almost 500 pages of photos, with most pages having 3 photos and some with only one or two, so the total number of photos is extroidinary in a single volume. The edition that I got has glossy pages with good overall printing and binding quality, so the produciton standard is high.

I got mine from Amazon, and with shipping in the US, the total cost was less than US$33, or less than twice the cost of a 75 page Concord title, with about the same photo and caption quality.

I also like the organization by time and major operational periods. I consider the book to be a very good companion to be refered to when reading other history references that inevitabley come up short on the photos offered. So, for instance, as I was re-reading "A Dark and Bloody Ground," "Armored Attack" was a great source to have at hand. Same for reading the US Army's historical survey on the battle for St-Lo; "Armored Attack" provided a ton of excellent photos of US armor working with the US 30th ID. The organization makes finding photos of particular operational areas or battles very easy.

There are a few "curious" inclusions. For instance, there are a few pages of German and Commonwealth armor operations where the photos stand alone and are only vaguely conected to the US Armor Operations context. The first few pages of "generic" armor ID photos is not particulary useful, but maybe other readers would see that differently. But these are minor issues and only represent a few out of almost a half-thousand other very interesting and useful pages.

On a side note, one of the most interesting secions of the book deals with the Cullin hedgerow cutters. Mr Zaloga breakes these down by "type" or "test" series numbers, i.e. the "Green Dozer;" the T-1 "Rinocerous;" T-1E1 with extra prongs; T-1E2 heavy bumper with 5 prongs; T-2 "Douglas" device; T-3 "Rhino;and the " T-4 "Green Dozer Rhino;" (These "T" designations are quotations from the book.)

I've been meaning to post a question here as to whether these were official designations or did Mr. Zaloga make up these up for convience in his own research. I've never seen them used before in any other reference.

At any rate, the book, "Armored Attack", is IMO an excellent photo reference and a great value. I've already pre-ordered the next volume.

HTH,
Mike
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Joined: July 2nd, 2006, 2:16 pm

January 17th, 2012, 6:04 pm #6

How's the photo reproduction quality in the above book? Amazon.com reviews seem to vary...
I thought the photo quality was very good, the book is really an excellent buy, given the large number of photos in it and the coverage it offers.
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Joined: March 22nd, 2005, 10:08 pm

January 17th, 2012, 6:30 pm #7

however, IMO, the book is an excelent value. In regards to image quality, the photos that are of marginal quality (as opposed to excellent quality) are a small portion of the whole. The book has almost 500 pages of photos, with most pages having 3 photos and some with only one or two, so the total number of photos is extroidinary in a single volume. The edition that I got has glossy pages with good overall printing and binding quality, so the produciton standard is high.

I got mine from Amazon, and with shipping in the US, the total cost was less than US$33, or less than twice the cost of a 75 page Concord title, with about the same photo and caption quality.

I also like the organization by time and major operational periods. I consider the book to be a very good companion to be refered to when reading other history references that inevitabley come up short on the photos offered. So, for instance, as I was re-reading "A Dark and Bloody Ground," "Armored Attack" was a great source to have at hand. Same for reading the US Army's historical survey on the battle for St-Lo; "Armored Attack" provided a ton of excellent photos of US armor working with the US 30th ID. The organization makes finding photos of particular operational areas or battles very easy.

There are a few "curious" inclusions. For instance, there are a few pages of German and Commonwealth armor operations where the photos stand alone and are only vaguely conected to the US Armor Operations context. The first few pages of "generic" armor ID photos is not particulary useful, but maybe other readers would see that differently. But these are minor issues and only represent a few out of almost a half-thousand other very interesting and useful pages.

On a side note, one of the most interesting secions of the book deals with the Cullin hedgerow cutters. Mr Zaloga breakes these down by "type" or "test" series numbers, i.e. the "Green Dozer;" the T-1 "Rinocerous;" T-1E1 with extra prongs; T-1E2 heavy bumper with 5 prongs; T-2 "Douglas" device; T-3 "Rhino;and the " T-4 "Green Dozer Rhino;" (These "T" designations are quotations from the book.)

I've been meaning to post a question here as to whether these were official designations or did Mr. Zaloga make up these up for convience in his own research. I've never seen them used before in any other reference.

At any rate, the book, "Armored Attack", is IMO an excellent photo reference and a great value. I've already pre-ordered the next volume.

HTH,
Mike
Mike:
The designations for the various hedgerow cutters comes from a report on the devices by a First US Army AFV&W section officer. They are not official Ordnance designations, but the designations used by the field organizations which built them.

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Joined: March 14th, 2010, 5:32 pm

January 17th, 2012, 9:12 pm #8

How's the photo reproduction quality in the above book? Amazon.com reviews seem to vary...
I received my copy of "Armored Attack" some days ago from amazon.de.

Overall a very nice book and I can't complain about the quality of the pics.
But, I did notice that in some cases the captions are printed to the wrong picture (or the other way round).
I have already found some five or six of these errors. Not a very bad thing, but "unlovely".

Did someone has also mentioned this case?

Is this a known problem, Mr. Zaloga?

Greetings from Germany

Michael



If it moves, shoot it. If not, paint it OD.
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Joined: December 7th, 2003, 8:11 pm

January 17th, 2012, 9:44 pm #9

How's the photo reproduction quality in the above book? Amazon.com reviews seem to vary...
Am I right in thinking that these can be an addition to the Concord "US tank battles in France", etc series?

Thanks in advance.

best regards,


Marc Brandes

Replace dod in email address
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Joined: March 28th, 2002, 9:10 am

January 18th, 2012, 1:00 am #10

How's the photo reproduction quality in the above book? Amazon.com reviews seem to vary...
I have, like it, plan to buy the next one! Thanks Steve! N/T
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