Painting Dragon MagicTracks

Joined: March 22nd, 2005, 7:19 pm

March 6th, 2018, 8:22 pm #1

I'm seeking advice for painting the Dragon "Magic Track" individual track links. Personally, I prefer to paint tracks and running gear separately because it allows me to do a more thorough job. The tracks don't get in the way of painting the rubber on the bogeys and vice versa, I can paint all wheels and rollers etc separately... I'm sure you all know the benefits Does anyone have any advice as to a better way to install these tracks? It looks as though they need to be assembled in place in order for each length to be formed correctly. I imagine that building them up in lengths without getting cement on the rollers, sprockets and wheel would be near impossible. This is my first kick at these. I've worked with Fruil tracks before and love them, but those can be pinned and installed last. Are the "Magic Tracks" worth the trouble, or the standard practice to just paint the whole tank with the tracks attached? Just seeking for a better way. I'd really like to give the kit tracks a shot as; they look fine as is, and Fruil tracks aren't cheap.

I look forward to learning from all your experiences with these.

Cheers,

Matt

Last edited by Kriegmeister23 on March 6th, 2018, 8:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

Personally, I just glue them all on

March 6th, 2018, 9:52 pm #2

And then paint the tank as a unit. It's not hard to paint the tires if applicable, and to paint the tracks. I use Vallejo Panzer Aces Rubber and Track Primer. With tanks like a Panther, you can leave the outer layer of wheels loose to make painting the inner wheels easier. Really, I have had no issue with this at all and in the end you wouldn't be able to tell it was painted as a unit or individually.

You can also just slip the wheels in place on the tank, and then glue the tracks to the wheels. When dry, remove the whole thing. This makes paitning easier as you have access to both sides and all angles.

Or, slip or glue the wheels in place on the tank, assemble the tracks and wrap them around the wheels, and let dry. When dry, slip off and paint. You can slip the pre shaped tracks back on later. How you decide to assemble the tracks is up to you. You can build them up sort of like link and length tracks in segments, or just glue together the required number of links with a slow drying glue and then position them and let dry.

For all the hype, I've found a lot of the Magic tracks to be "okay" at best. The detail tends to be soft and they can and do have mold knock out marks and some like the 251 halftrack tracks do not fit well because the joining pins are too small.
DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: October 18th, 2004, 6:49 pm

March 7th, 2018, 5:53 pm #3

I'm seeking advice for painting the Dragon "Magic Track" individual track links. Personally, I prefer to paint tracks and running gear separately because it allows me to do a more thorough job. The tracks don't get in the way of painting the rubber on the bogeys and vice versa, I can paint all wheels and rollers etc separately... I'm sure you all know the benefits Does anyone have any advice as to a better way to install these tracks? It looks as though they need to be assembled in place in order for each length to be formed correctly. I imagine that building them up in lengths without getting cement on the rollers, sprockets and wheel would be near impossible. This is my first kick at these. I've worked with Fruil tracks before and love them, but those can be pinned and installed last. Are the "Magic Tracks" worth the trouble, or the standard practice to just paint the whole tank with the tracks attached? Just seeking for a better way. I'd really like to give the kit tracks a shot as; they look fine as is, and Fruil tracks aren't cheap.

I look forward to learning from all your experiences with these.

Cheers,

Matt
Matt,

I build my Magic Tracks before the fenders are glued on and after all the running gear has been assembled. I also leave the wheels loose to make it easier to paint. I get all the links trimmed and ready and then glue them together in runs of about 30 or so links using a straight edge to keep them lined up. Once that is done, which takes just a few minutes, then I glue the sections together and set them aside for about 10-15 minutes so the glue is still tacky but starting to take hold. I set the model on the tracks and then bring up each end and join them at the top of the drive sprocket and glue them together taking care not to glue them to the sprockets. I use my tweezers to form the sag in between the return rollers and let them dry completely. Now you can remove them and they will hold their shape for painting.

Regards,

Tom
Tom Cockle
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Joined: July 13th, 2004, 1:39 am

My way...

March 8th, 2018, 2:41 pm #4

I'm seeking advice for painting the Dragon "Magic Track" individual track links. Personally, I prefer to paint tracks and running gear separately because it allows me to do a more thorough job. The tracks don't get in the way of painting the rubber on the bogeys and vice versa, I can paint all wheels and rollers etc separately... I'm sure you all know the benefits Does anyone have any advice as to a better way to install these tracks? It looks as though they need to be assembled in place in order for each length to be formed correctly. I imagine that building them up in lengths without getting cement on the rollers, sprockets and wheel would be near impossible. This is my first kick at these. I've worked with Fruil tracks before and love them, but those can be pinned and installed last. Are the "Magic Tracks" worth the trouble, or the standard practice to just paint the whole tank with the tracks attached? Just seeking for a better way. I'd really like to give the kit tracks a shot as; they look fine as is, and Fruil tracks aren't cheap.

I look forward to learning from all your experiences with these.

Cheers,

Matt
There are many ways you can skin this cat. I prefer to build them in two segments; an upper and a lower run. I build then and use liquid glue to attach them in long sections. I then form them around the top and bottom runs of the roadwheels as the glue sets up. I do not attach the ends of the tracks together though; usually leaving a break at the sprocket and idler. This gives me a stiff upper and lower section. I paint and weather these off the tank, then join them together after the tank is also painted and weathered. Once attached, I will do some final weathering to blend the tank and tracks together.
Field Artillery --- The KING of BATTLE!!!

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Joined: August 18th, 2014, 7:34 pm

I haven't actually tried this...

March 10th, 2018, 11:22 pm #5

I'm seeking advice for painting the Dragon "Magic Track" individual track links. Personally, I prefer to paint tracks and running gear separately because it allows me to do a more thorough job. The tracks don't get in the way of painting the rubber on the bogeys and vice versa, I can paint all wheels and rollers etc separately... I'm sure you all know the benefits Does anyone have any advice as to a better way to install these tracks? It looks as though they need to be assembled in place in order for each length to be formed correctly. I imagine that building them up in lengths without getting cement on the rollers, sprockets and wheel would be near impossible. This is my first kick at these. I've worked with Fruil tracks before and love them, but those can be pinned and installed last. Are the "Magic Tracks" worth the trouble, or the standard practice to just paint the whole tank with the tracks attached? Just seeking for a better way. I'd really like to give the kit tracks a shot as; they look fine as is, and Fruil tracks aren't cheap.

I look forward to learning from all your experiences with these.

Cheers,

Matt
…but I wonder if it might not be possible to use something like acrylic medium to hold the tracks together before painting. The entire track run should still be flexible enough to shape. Once it's finally in position, just don't move it around much and the tracks should remain in place without being cemented together.

Now that I think of it, I'll give that a try myself. If it doesn't work, there still must be some sort of glue that will allow the track run to remain flexible.
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