Paint chip technique question

Hosted by Dave Parker from AFV Modeller magazine and Adam Wilder, this discussion group is geared towards modelling technique questions ranging from construction to final weathering. This forum was created so that "newbies" can post without being intimidated by the sometimes highly technical nature of the other discussion groups.

Paint chip technique question

Joined: September 26th, 2006, 4:48 pm

November 9th, 2007, 4:41 pm #1

What type sponge are you guys out there using for paint chipping? I tried to use a small 10/0 brush, but was not happy with the results. The chipping was too big and the effect looked more painted than chipped. I've seen some photos of sponges used for this:





What works best?

Thanks,
Erik
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Joined: March 14th, 2005, 1:40 pm

November 11th, 2007, 2:01 pm #2

Dear Erik
I use anything that looks like what you are looking at in the photos. I think I got my sponge from the padding used to keep a computer monitor safe while packaged for shipping.

Are you wiping the excess paint away on a piece of paper or dinner napkin before attempting to place the chips onto your model? You can see where I am doing this in the second photo you placed in your post. See the napkin with the paint on it? Please let us know.

Sincerely
ANPW
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Joined: September 26th, 2006, 4:48 pm

November 11th, 2007, 10:20 pm #3

Adam,

Thanks. I was wiping the paint off before applying it to the model. I think I was just using the wrong tool for the job. I rummaged around and found a sponge of the type you had mentioned. I'll try that.

Thanks again,
Erik
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Joined: April 1st, 2005, 7:44 pm

November 12th, 2007, 1:12 pm #4

Hi Erik, I never had good luck with a sponge either. I use a small brush (not tin though) and thinned enamel paint. Very little paint on the brush. As I apply the marks, I have to wash off about half that look bad. Since I apply them on an acrylic finish, I can easily wipe away the enamel scratches with a thinner moistened brush. If the enamels are thinned, you sometimes have to apply several marks to the same area to get the effect you want. HTH, Dmitry

Dmitry Kiyatkin
Baltimore, Maryland
http://www.ww2models.com
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Joined: September 20th, 2003, 3:28 pm

November 12th, 2007, 4:52 pm #5

Erik if you choose to use sponges and want to experiment a bit do two things.
1. Go to an OK art/craft store they will have a variety of natural and synthetic to choose from-look at the cell structures and make some choices as to what might be interesting to experiment with-a bunch of sponges won't even cost you $10 USD
2. Do as above but in the cleaning products isle in the grocery store-lots of different sponges foe almost no money

I predominately use pieces of rough natural sea sponge and , like Adam, a coarse cell packing foam/sponge. I like the coarse because I feel it gives me more control because it lays in paint much more slowly. It's always easier to add more than to reduce what you've gone a bit overboard on

My2cbobC
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Joined: March 21st, 2007, 8:49 pm

November 15th, 2007, 2:11 am #6

Erik,

I have used small pieces of foam paint brushes. if you look at them in the store, you will see that the have different densities (justa a byproduct of the mfg.)...I use tweexers, and like Adam, dab off the paint first.





Marc

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