Oil paints

Hosted by Dave Parker from AFV Modeller magazine and Adam Wilder, this discussion group is geared towards modelling technique questions ranging from construction to final weathering. This forum was created so that "newbies" can post without being intimidated by the sometimes highly technical nature of the other discussion groups.

Oil paints

miguel dela rama
miguel dela rama

October 12th, 2003, 12:15 am #1

What type of thinner is recommended for oil paints? I've heard that turpentine melts the plastic or ruins the paint? Is this true?

thanks!
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tim whistler
tim whistler

October 12th, 2003, 3:17 am #2

it won't ruin plastic and is perfect for cleaning oil paint off brushes or thinning it. You can also buy turpenoid, which is a little less harsh but will do the same thing. Hope this helps;
-Tim
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Ken Neil
Ken Neil

October 13th, 2003, 1:58 am #3

I don't know about turpentine. It leaves a sticky gummy residue that over time can ruin good brushes. Turpenoid is probably your better bet. I use plain old
Home Hardware or Home Depot paint thinner for thinning oils and lacquer thinner for cleaning brushes
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Chris Johnson
Chris Johnson

October 13th, 2003, 1:04 pm #4

What type of thinner is recommended for oil paints? I've heard that turpentine melts the plastic or ruins the paint? Is this true?

thanks!
I can only give you my experience with turpenoid but I mixed up a wash two weeks ago and applied it to a Centaur model I was working on and it's still not dry. It made the Tamiya acrylic paint gummy to the touch and it will smear right off the plastic. Although it's gradually seems to be drying, it's leaving a sheen as it does. This long drying period may be as a result of high humidity in my basement, for lack of anything else that I can think of. I've moved the model upstairs to see if that quickens the drying process. My next experiment will be with mineral spirits.

Cheers,

Chris
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Alan Bessler
Alan Bessler

October 13th, 2003, 6:55 pm #5

You should clear coat the the model with a gloss acrylic clear before the wash.
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Chris Johnson
Chris Johnson

October 15th, 2003, 12:15 am #6

...and a friend advised that he applies his oil wash directly over the acrylic base paint. It works for him and if I follow his lead and use mineral spirits, I hope it'll work for me.

Cheers,

Chris
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Joined: August 28th, 2001, 4:56 pm

October 15th, 2003, 1:40 am #7

Chris did you use turpenoid or turpenoid natural? I too was experimenting with turpenoid back during the summer and I picked up turpenoid natural instead of turpenoid. Luckily I tried the wash mixture on an old model I keep for just that purpose. It is still today, almost 4 months later, tacky to the touch. I threw that bottle out real quick. I'm not sure what turpenoid natural is used for but it sure isn't for a wash!

Mike
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Ross Ferro
Ross Ferro

October 15th, 2003, 2:13 am #8

What type of thinner is recommended for oil paints? I've heard that turpentine melts the plastic or ruins the paint? Is this true?

thanks!
Try Zippo or Ronson lighter fluid.

It thins oil paints and also drys flat.

It doesn't appear to attack the base coat paint either.

Regards

Ross
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Dusty Burman
Dusty Burman

October 15th, 2003, 5:44 pm #9

What type of thinner is recommended for oil paints? I've heard that turpentine melts the plastic or ruins the paint? Is this true?

thanks!
Yes, I understand that this will not do the best job of completely thinning Oils. What it does do is make a 'wash' or stain that is unique. Turps do a very complete job of thinning oils but that's not the effect I was looking for. When I used turps I was underwhelmed by the long dry time required to judge the results. I think that slow drying also promoted pigment gathering in lines and corners. I decided there was minimal texture diference between the turps wash and airbrushing with a 'paint' wash. The Floquil Air Brush thinner leaves very, very small specks in the wash and dries faster than the turps. Don't mix a 'batch' of this wash mixture and store it in a bottle as the paint will eventually seperate from the Floquil thinner and solidify. I am using this mixture over old 'Thin with Diosol' Floquil that was mixed with PPG Duracryl Clear and Retarder.

Clearly the effect is different than turps. Maybe not the look you are trying for. Something to experiment with on scrap finished with whatever paint you are using.

Dusty Burman
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Chris Johnson
Chris Johnson

October 15th, 2003, 11:40 pm #10

Chris did you use turpenoid or turpenoid natural? I too was experimenting with turpenoid back during the summer and I picked up turpenoid natural instead of turpenoid. Luckily I tried the wash mixture on an old model I keep for just that purpose. It is still today, almost 4 months later, tacky to the touch. I threw that bottle out real quick. I'm not sure what turpenoid natural is used for but it sure isn't for a wash!

Mike
I just checked and it is Turpenoid Natural that I bought. That must be the problem. That'll teach me to try a new technique without checking it out on an old hulk first.

Cheers,

Chris
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