milestones in dioramamodelling

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milestones in dioramamodelling

marijn van gils
marijn van gils

February 11th, 2002, 2:06 pm #1

hello all!

in the Axis DG, I read a post in which Jean-Baptiste Verlhac's Famo is called a milestone in modelling. I cannot but agree on that, since it went further than any model before, it set the standards higher than ever and it makes me rethink my ways of modelling a lot.

In diorama's, I can see some milestones also. They will always be slightly personal ideas, since models can have differnt effects on different people. So for me these are some milestones in dioramamodelling:

Lewis Pruneau: "The Paris gun"
Phil Stutcinskas: "Meine ehre heist treue" and "After the battle"
Bill Horan: "Ghosts of Chillianwhalla"
Bernhard Lüstig: the one with the burnt-out StuG under a railroad bridge


Which do you think I forgot? (if you can post pictures of them: great!)

Best wishes,

Marijn
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Joined: February 6th, 2002, 8:09 pm

February 11th, 2002, 8:28 pm #2

...one I thought you would have listed, Marijn!
Was awe-inspiring when I first saw it.

Ray Peterson
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Nick Moore
Nick Moore

February 11th, 2002, 9:19 pm #3

hello all!

in the Axis DG, I read a post in which Jean-Baptiste Verlhac's Famo is called a milestone in modelling. I cannot but agree on that, since it went further than any model before, it set the standards higher than ever and it makes me rethink my ways of modelling a lot.

In diorama's, I can see some milestones also. They will always be slightly personal ideas, since models can have differnt effects on different people. So for me these are some milestones in dioramamodelling:

Lewis Pruneau: "The Paris gun"
Phil Stutcinskas: "Meine ehre heist treue" and "After the battle"
Bill Horan: "Ghosts of Chillianwhalla"
Bernhard Lüstig: the one with the burnt-out StuG under a railroad bridge


Which do you think I forgot? (if you can post pictures of them: great!)

Best wishes,

Marijn
Shep Paines series of dios that featured Monogram's armour models really inspired me when I was a kid. That was the first time I saw anything like a diorama full stop. As a promotional tool for the manufacturer it was also excellent as I'd love just looking at the boxes in the shop. Regs Nick.
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Andy Fettes
Andy Fettes

February 12th, 2002, 12:54 am #4

hello all!

in the Axis DG, I read a post in which Jean-Baptiste Verlhac's Famo is called a milestone in modelling. I cannot but agree on that, since it went further than any model before, it set the standards higher than ever and it makes me rethink my ways of modelling a lot.

In diorama's, I can see some milestones also. They will always be slightly personal ideas, since models can have differnt effects on different people. So for me these are some milestones in dioramamodelling:

Lewis Pruneau: "The Paris gun"
Phil Stutcinskas: "Meine ehre heist treue" and "After the battle"
Bill Horan: "Ghosts of Chillianwhalla"
Bernhard Lüstig: the one with the burnt-out StuG under a railroad bridge


Which do you think I forgot? (if you can post pictures of them: great!)

Best wishes,

Marijn
its got to be that one for me the detail on the bridge wow the hotel interior figures models the whole package what do you all think?
Andy.
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john gauerke
john gauerke

February 12th, 2002, 2:02 am #5

hello all!

in the Axis DG, I read a post in which Jean-Baptiste Verlhac's Famo is called a milestone in modelling. I cannot but agree on that, since it went further than any model before, it set the standards higher than ever and it makes me rethink my ways of modelling a lot.

In diorama's, I can see some milestones also. They will always be slightly personal ideas, since models can have differnt effects on different people. So for me these are some milestones in dioramamodelling:

Lewis Pruneau: "The Paris gun"
Phil Stutcinskas: "Meine ehre heist treue" and "After the battle"
Bill Horan: "Ghosts of Chillianwhalla"
Bernhard Lüstig: the one with the burnt-out StuG under a railroad bridge


Which do you think I forgot? (if you can post pictures of them: great!)

Best wishes,

Marijn
great topic. bill horan's "last stand at gandamak" comes to mind. almost anything done by lewis pruneau, his u-505 dio, the pearl harbor dio, his marine siege guns dio. marijn, you panther in the church dio is most impressive. john rosengrandt's "coffee break" dio is one that i have always enjoyed. john
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Brian N. Stanley
Brian N. Stanley

February 12th, 2002, 4:59 am #6

hello all!

in the Axis DG, I read a post in which Jean-Baptiste Verlhac's Famo is called a milestone in modelling. I cannot but agree on that, since it went further than any model before, it set the standards higher than ever and it makes me rethink my ways of modelling a lot.

In diorama's, I can see some milestones also. They will always be slightly personal ideas, since models can have differnt effects on different people. So for me these are some milestones in dioramamodelling:

Lewis Pruneau: "The Paris gun"
Phil Stutcinskas: "Meine ehre heist treue" and "After the battle"
Bill Horan: "Ghosts of Chillianwhalla"
Bernhard Lüstig: the one with the burnt-out StuG under a railroad bridge


Which do you think I forgot? (if you can post pictures of them: great!)

Best wishes,

Marijn
Hi Guys,

Over the years I've seen some spectacular Dio's of all kinds and, with the use of this website, from all over the world. I think the works of Shep Paine and Francois Verlinden were the early foundations for what we try to do today. As I look around the modelling world today I am amazed at the work of some of you regulars to this site do. It has truly become an artistic hobby as we move into the new century! Keep up the great work, everyone.

Brian
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Kip Rudge
Kip Rudge

February 12th, 2002, 1:33 pm #7

hello all!

in the Axis DG, I read a post in which Jean-Baptiste Verlhac's Famo is called a milestone in modelling. I cannot but agree on that, since it went further than any model before, it set the standards higher than ever and it makes me rethink my ways of modelling a lot.

In diorama's, I can see some milestones also. They will always be slightly personal ideas, since models can have differnt effects on different people. So for me these are some milestones in dioramamodelling:

Lewis Pruneau: "The Paris gun"
Phil Stutcinskas: "Meine ehre heist treue" and "After the battle"
Bill Horan: "Ghosts of Chillianwhalla"
Bernhard Lüstig: the one with the burnt-out StuG under a railroad bridge


Which do you think I forgot? (if you can post pictures of them: great!)

Best wishes,

Marijn
It wasn't so much seeing the work of folks like Paine and Verlinden that got me going, it was picking up copies of Military Modeling, the old U.S. version. It had doofuses just like me building neat stuff. It was one of those deals where I got to thinking if they can then why can't I? Another oft over looked fellow is Hal Sanford (The Illustrated Modelholic)who really understands how to incorporate a story line into a diorama. His Korean Chaffee dio and Russian T-72 before a parade are just great.
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marijn van gils
marijn van gils

February 12th, 2002, 2:07 pm #8

...I also started with Verlinden. But is there one diorama of him that would b your favorite? Or beter: what diorama would you think to be the best known and typical Verlinden dio?

And I guess I'm too young for Shep... I don't own his book, but looked trough it on some occasions. Everyone keeps telling me about his 88 in a church, but I still don't remember how it actually looks like... Strange, isn't it? Guess I've got to learn my classics better...

more?

For me also, a desert diorama by Thierry Van Den Bogaert was a milestone: it set the dioramastandards in Belgium suddenly a serious step higher and inspired me a lot to do better. Link:

http://krimi.tripod.com/em99/emc7.html

third row on the right (of course this pic doesn't do it justice)

more personal milestones out there?

Marijn
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Jakko Westerbeke
Jakko Westerbeke

February 12th, 2002, 3:18 pm #9

The construction of that diorama is described in one of the early Verlinden Way books; no. 2, I think.
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Dani Alfonsea
Dani Alfonsea

February 12th, 2002, 4:14 pm #10

Hello,

The phenomenal 88 mm in church dio featured also in a Tamiya catalogue. Some other Shep's works appeared in those catalogues, and also in one of those hard-to-find Tamiya manuals.
Personally, I find Sheperd Paine deserves much more than Verlinden the "milestone" title. Of course Verlinden has been a very important figure too, but Paine is in another league completely.

My opinion!

Dani
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