Making US Periscope Guards

Hosted by Dave Parker from AFV Modeller magazine and Adam Wilder, this discussion group is geared towards modelling technique questions ranging from construction to final weathering. This forum was created so that "newbies" can post without being intimidated by the sometimes highly technical nature of the other discussion groups.

Making US Periscope Guards

Joined: January 24th, 2003, 7:55 pm

July 30th, 2003, 10:03 pm #1

Dear Group: I've searched and perhaps missed a previous posting on this, but does anyone have some effective method(s) for making periscope guards for Shermans, Pershings, etc.? Many thanks.

Chris Child
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Dave O'Hara
Dave O'Hara

July 31st, 2003, 12:53 am #2

and a question I'd like to see answered, as well. Shep Paine used to make his from stretched sprue, I think. Others use brass rod and actually solder the pieces together. Me? I'm not that skilled and I rely on On the Mark P.E. sets, or good old Italeri leftovers. The only problem with the P.E. ones, is that they are usually flat and need some sort of relief added. Still haven't figured out how to do that. The Italeri ones are nice, but a little on the thick side. This makes it necessary to thin them down, a little. I'd love to get my hands on a set of instructions explaining a good, cheap, relatively easy way of making those guards. Good luck in your search, Christopher. Regards, Dave
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Reidar Morten Syvertsen
Reidar Morten Syvertsen

August 1st, 2003, 12:43 am #3

Dear Group: I've searched and perhaps missed a previous posting on this, but does anyone have some effective method(s) for making periscope guards for Shermans, Pershings, etc.? Many thanks.

Chris Child
Just kidding guys, anyway, here's how I did mine before the advent of the later Eduard PE sets. (Their periscope guards are so thin you need a heavy duty looking glass to discover they're flat in profile,
I heartily recommend them, and no, I'm not a stockholder in that company.....)

Use thin brass or copper wire, choice depends on quality of your cutters I suppose, although copper is more easily shaped of course!
Anyway, mark four contact-points on hatch with a needle, using these as guide, drill straight through.
Bend and shape two small "croquet-hoops", remember to flatten top, ends of hoop may be as long as you wish, somewhere between half an inch and a yard.
Put each hoop through the two holes either side of periscope, adjust for height, tilt them slightly outwards and secure with thin cyano.
If you plan to have hatches closed, all is fine, just glue'em down!
If open hatches are desired, you cut the hoop ends sticking out, apply four droplets of thick cyano, drizzle some talc over it, count slowly to 52, then sand flush.
Topsides, you now have two sturdy hoops on each side of periscope, cut two lenghts of wire, fine-tune'em using a needle file, then fix in place with thick cyano.

Used up a lot of words there, hope it made some sense - it's so much easier to show than explain in writing!!!

HTH

Reidar Morten
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Dave O'Hara
Dave O'Hara

August 1st, 2003, 5:53 pm #4

51 and not 52? I can't go beyond 51. Never good with numbers, you see. Seriously though, that sounds like a good approach and will give one the rounded appearance of the rod that was used to fabricate these pesky little things. I'll give it a try and let you know how it works out! Again, thanks! Regards, Dave
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Reidar Morten Syvertsen
Reidar Morten Syvertsen

August 4th, 2003, 7:15 am #5

52 was a small inside joke - to myself.....
Now, is that introvert or what???
My next Firefly will be a Coldstream Guards Ic Hybrid with Typhoon rockets U see, hence the 52.
If you prefer to stop at 51; Grenadier Guards, why not?
Alternatively we could go all out to 53 and have a laugh with the Irish Guards!
(Note to self: no posting whilst havin' a wee dram...)

Slainte Mhath

Reidar Morten
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Dave O'Hara
Dave O'Hara

August 4th, 2003, 8:10 pm #6

and all that stuff, boyo! Thanks for the pictures you sent. I'm looking forward to trying your technique and adding it to my repitoire (sp?). Best regards, Dave

P.S. What color did you use for the overall scheme of your Sherman? Khaki Drab?
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Joined: January 24th, 2003, 7:55 pm

August 5th, 2003, 12:38 am #7

Dear Group:

Thanks for the comments, ideas & suggestions. Much to experiment with.

Christopher Child
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Reidar Morten Syvertsen
Reidar Morten Syvertsen

August 6th, 2003, 3:28 pm #8

and all that stuff, boyo! Thanks for the pictures you sent. I'm looking forward to trying your technique and adding it to my repitoire (sp?). Best regards, Dave

P.S. What color did you use for the overall scheme of your Sherman? Khaki Drab?
Thanks for the nice comments Dave, the Firefly in the pics was of course still "in progress", AFV Modeller got all my pics of the finished model together with an article. Just haven't got round to taking any new photos yet.
I believe Xtracolor X816 British Army Khaki Drab or possibly X815 British Army Mid Bronze Green was used on this model. The British SCC 15 faded more towards green than the American Khaki green did, so that's something to watch out for. Now, whether the Firefly's got a complete paint job, or if only the "affected areas" got new paint, I do not know. My model got "new paint" all over anyway.

I originally intended to try out a Humbrol-mix for SCC 15, but was one colour short and could not get my hands on it quick, hence the use of Xtracolor.
The mix for SCC15 and indeed all British and some US colours can be found here:

http://www.mafva.com/resources.asp

You might as well print out those pages, laminate them in plastic and count yourself lucky you found THE reference on these matters. Word.

Regards

Reidar Morten
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Dave O'Hara
Dave O'Hara

August 6th, 2003, 7:46 pm #9

Thanks for the reply. I used a Polly Scale color on my solitary Firefly (still unfinished) and it was, believe it or not, a WWI RFC color that looked pretty good for the WWII British Khaki Drab. I hope to finish that model, one day and post it at my photo site, so you can see what I mean. In the meantime, thanks for all the help and information. Regards, Dave
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