M40 GMC question

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M40 GMC question

Joined: June 27th, 2007, 4:25 pm

November 22nd, 2016, 5:03 pm #1

Hi all,

Now we have two kits of the M40 GMC, from AFV Club and from Tamiya. And both have support parts for the folded down platform in the rear: AFV gives rods, Tamiya chains.

Can anyone please steer me to photos of an M40 with either of these suspenders? And I mean of a DEPLOYED gun, not of the one in that museum that puts yellow placards in front of its exhibits.

Thanks in advance,
Peter
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Joined: January 19th, 2011, 7:01 am

November 22nd, 2016, 7:03 pm #2

chains at least would be OK...

http://militarymashup.com/mmu_get_jpeg. ... 86866d6df6

....but many period pics show no chains and no rods either

H.P.
Last edited by Henri-Pierre Mas on November 22nd, 2016, 7:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 11:02 pm

November 23rd, 2016, 2:21 am #3

Hi all,

Now we have two kits of the M40 GMC, from AFV Club and from Tamiya. And both have support parts for the folded down platform in the rear: AFV gives rods, Tamiya chains.

Can anyone please steer me to photos of an M40 with either of these suspenders? And I mean of a DEPLOYED gun, not of the one in that museum that puts yellow placards in front of its exhibits.

Thanks in advance,
Peter
The tailgate was effectively part of the spade. It rested upon the spade frame when lowered, so no supports were needed. The cables seen in photos were attached to the spade; raising and lowering it did the same for the tailgate.





http://www.net-maquettes.com/pictures/m ... alkaround/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wy7nRnVXndQ

There were locking links that held the spade up in traveling position but these were disengaged when the spade was lowered.

The chains on the Tamiya build-ups are connected to the pintles for the tailgate locking pins on the fighting compartment rear. They are attached to something on the tailgate, but they don't and can't do anything. The chains would have to be removed to raise and lock the tailgate. They probably saw the photo H-P referenced and extrapolated something from it.

The rods on the AFV Club kit attach to lugs on the tailgate that aren't there on the real thing, at least on the standardized vehicles. At the top there isn't even a lug or hole; they are just hooked behind the armor.

KL
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Joined: June 27th, 2007, 4:25 pm

November 23rd, 2016, 10:55 am #4

Another mystery solved - but what does it tell us that both kit makers made the same mistake?
Peter
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Joined: March 9th, 2012, 4:57 pm

November 23rd, 2016, 4:01 pm #5

Or that you should not trust museum examples or bad photos even if they are the only ones available?

Information not shared is information lost.
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 11:02 pm

November 23rd, 2016, 5:30 pm #6

Another mystery solved - but what does it tell us that both kit makers made the same mistake?
Peter
T83 S/N 1 that was at APG had staples welded onto the tailgate and rod ends connected to them for many years. There were still rods in the fighting compartment after the vehicle was refinished and the tailgate and spade lifted. Thus, the AFV Club kit may be close to the original T83 configuration. The Tamiya kit seems to be an extrapolation or assumption, much like AFV's (and many, many, modeler's) assumption that the 155mm gun and 8-inch howitzer were identical except for the projecting part of the tube.

This is yet another example of why it is wrong to judge the accuracy of Kit B based on how well it matches Kit A.

KL
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 9:49 am

November 25th, 2016, 9:28 am #7

The tailgate was effectively part of the spade. It rested upon the spade frame when lowered, so no supports were needed. The cables seen in photos were attached to the spade; raising and lowering it did the same for the tailgate.





http://www.net-maquettes.com/pictures/m ... alkaround/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wy7nRnVXndQ

There were locking links that held the spade up in traveling position but these were disengaged when the spade was lowered.

The chains on the Tamiya build-ups are connected to the pintles for the tailgate locking pins on the fighting compartment rear. They are attached to something on the tailgate, but they don't and can't do anything. The chains would have to be removed to raise and lock the tailgate. They probably saw the photo H-P referenced and extrapolated something from it.

The rods on the AFV Club kit attach to lugs on the tailgate that aren't there on the real thing, at least on the standardized vehicles. At the top there isn't even a lug or hole; they are just hooked behind the armor.

KL
Hi Kurt, from the pics seems the tailgate was hinged to the front of the spade, but just resting freely over a couple of rollers/supports at the rear. With the spade deployed In level conditons the tailgate would remain flat, but having the spade well-dugged into the terrain would make the tailgate to tip in an angle not easy to work on. So think maybe the rods/chains were a field expedient in Korea to get the tailgate allways flat whatever the spade position?
Last edited by JavierDeLuelmo on November 25th, 2016, 9:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
www.dieselwerk.blogspot.com
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 7:41 pm

November 26th, 2016, 4:58 pm #8

T83 S/N 1 that was at APG had staples welded onto the tailgate and rod ends connected to them for many years. There were still rods in the fighting compartment after the vehicle was refinished and the tailgate and spade lifted. Thus, the AFV Club kit may be close to the original T83 configuration. The Tamiya kit seems to be an extrapolation or assumption, much like AFV's (and many, many, modeler's) assumption that the 155mm gun and 8-inch howitzer were identical except for the projecting part of the tube.

This is yet another example of why it is wrong to judge the accuracy of Kit B based on how well it matches Kit A.

KL
991st Field Artillery Battalion received the T83 (155mm M2) and T89 (8" howitzer) in early 1945, they converted the T89 to a 'rump' T83 by mounting another 155mm M1 or M2 gun in place of the howitzer, then later re-installed the howitzer and used both during the brief time they served in action, during the assault on Cologne. Both vehicles were sent over to Europe as part of the Cobra program that also introduced the T26E3 Pershing heavy tank to the ETO. So, at some level the two weapons were interchangeable - how much had to be replaced I do not know, but apparently the upper carriages must have been very similar to allow this kind of change in the field. As an interesting aside, a friend at the APG Museum eons ago told me that the 8" howitzer had a reputation for phenomenal accuracy, so much so that they tried to duplicate it with other calibers, but were never able to match the 8" howitzer's performance.
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 11:02 pm

November 27th, 2016, 2:55 pm #9

Everything from the breechblock carrier to the muzzle was a different except for the interface with the cradle. All AFV Club did was change the portion of the tube from the last hoop to the muzzle.

KL
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 11:02 pm

November 27th, 2016, 3:03 pm #10

Hi Kurt, from the pics seems the tailgate was hinged to the front of the spade, but just resting freely over a couple of rollers/supports at the rear. With the spade deployed In level conditons the tailgate would remain flat, but having the spade well-dugged into the terrain would make the tailgate to tip in an angle not easy to work on. So think maybe the rods/chains were a field expedient in Korea to get the tailgate allways flat whatever the spade position?
If the vehicle backed onto the spade such that it was in a nose down position, keeping the tailgate off the spade (via improvised supports) would place the end of the tailgate high in the air, perhaps high enough that the retractable extension could not touch the ground. I would think sloping the tailgate toward the ground would be better.

KL
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