little help with chopper2 ?

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little help with chopper2 ?

Joined: December 30th, 2003, 4:39 am

January 27th, 2005, 5:17 pm #1

got my self a "The Chopper II" by Northwest Short Line. And having a little problem with it. Had one rod that wanted to try out. Rod was cut by an angle so I was thinking that I'll just cut it to have strait angles, cut one, two, four and so on... It still comes out to be cut on angel. And I'm using one of the metal "triangles" that come with the set.
Can one help don't understand what I'm doing wrong.

Ruslan.
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Jim Carswell
Jim Carswell

January 27th, 2005, 8:52 pm #2

Because the single-edge razor that Choppers use is 'V' shaped at the sharp end, when you slice rod or strip, the one side of the 'v' takes the path of least resistance, pushing the shorter bit away from the main piece, and leaving an angled cut. (hope this makes sense?). Inevitabely you have to sand it straight. On thicker pieces I try to score each side at the same place, then snap. You are doing nothing wrong, that's the way they work with thicker pieces of styrene.

Jim
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Joined: December 30th, 2003, 4:39 am

January 27th, 2005, 9:08 pm #3

Jim thanks for the information.
so they sell difect product, nice...

ok need to go bad to workshop and think of some thing out. Their's a way to fix this thing..... Now know it's not my problem.


Ruslan.
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Steven Brown
Steven Brown

January 28th, 2005, 12:50 pm #4

Because the single-edge razor that Choppers use is 'V' shaped at the sharp end, when you slice rod or strip, the one side of the 'v' takes the path of least resistance, pushing the shorter bit away from the main piece, and leaving an angled cut. (hope this makes sense?). Inevitabely you have to sand it straight. On thicker pieces I try to score each side at the same place, then snap. You are doing nothing wrong, that's the way they work with thicker pieces of styrene.

Jim
A blade that doesn't "flex" as it comes down onto the plastic.

Because of these angled cuts, I've found The Chopper almost useless.
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Joined: December 30th, 2003, 4:39 am

January 28th, 2005, 4:56 pm #5

but it can be fix.
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Robert Lockie
Robert Lockie

January 28th, 2005, 5:28 pm #6

got my self a "The Chopper II" by Northwest Short Line. And having a little problem with it. Had one rod that wanted to try out. Rod was cut by an angle so I was thinking that I'll just cut it to have strait angles, cut one, two, four and so on... It still comes out to be cut on angel. And I'm using one of the metal "triangles" that come with the set.
Can one help don't understand what I'm doing wrong.

Ruslan.
I did try replacing the single edge blade with a double edge blade (thinner, so less of a V) but the holes don't match (maybe on the Chopper 3, NWSL?). However, the solution I use is to hold the rod/strip against the triangular guide and then bring down the blade slowly to cut part-way through. Then I rotate the strip/rod 90 degrees and repeat until I am all the way through. The result is more of a conical end but it is better than an angular one and easier to clean up.

It is way better than trying to do them manually, particularly for making all the ammo tubes in a 1/76 3" mortar carrier.
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Joined: February 6th, 2002, 9:08 pm

January 28th, 2005, 7:03 pm #7

got my self a "The Chopper II" by Northwest Short Line. And having a little problem with it. Had one rod that wanted to try out. Rod was cut by an angle so I was thinking that I'll just cut it to have strait angles, cut one, two, four and so on... It still comes out to be cut on angel. And I'm using one of the metal "triangles" that come with the set.
Can one help don't understand what I'm doing wrong.

Ruslan.
A key to using the chopper is to not obstruct the movement of either end of the rod when chopping. Once I set the length with the triangle stop, I remove it (actually I have taped the triangle to the chopper so I just flip it up) and without holding either end I cut half way through, rotate the rod and cut again. Both sides are free to move so the angle is usually minimal.
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Dusty Burman
Dusty Burman

January 29th, 2005, 3:24 am #8

got my self a "The Chopper II" by Northwest Short Line. And having a little problem with it. Had one rod that wanted to try out. Rod was cut by an angle so I was thinking that I'll just cut it to have strait angles, cut one, two, four and so on... It still comes out to be cut on angel. And I'm using one of the metal "triangles" that come with the set.
Can one help don't understand what I'm doing wrong.

Ruslan.
What the Chopper or the Shay Wood Mitre does very, very well is make 90 degree cuts in plastic strip up to .250". More accurately, I can't seem to be able to cut good angles with these tools. Then how can I make good 90's with the flimsey blade? I set the stop to the proper length and score each side of the strip and then snap it off. I do rod and tube by rotating the stock to score its circumference and then snap it off. The ends are very square and flat.

I'm in 'advoidance' mode when it comes to cutting angles. In the past I have used 'The Sander'(?) to try to get consistant angles but the length consistancy isn't there for me. I haven't used wood in over 25 years because my 'Chopper like' Shay Wood Mitre made wandering cuts in it as well. Maybe milling is the best way to get perfect angles in styrene?
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Joined: December 30th, 2003, 4:39 am

January 29th, 2005, 7:14 pm #9

I did try replacing the single edge blade with a double edge blade (thinner, so less of a V) but the holes don't match (maybe on the Chopper 3, NWSL?). However, the solution I use is to hold the rod/strip against the triangular guide and then bring down the blade slowly to cut part-way through. Then I rotate the strip/rod 90 degrees and repeat until I am all the way through. The result is more of a conical end but it is better than an angular one and easier to clean up.

It is way better than trying to do them manually, particularly for making all the ammo tubes in a 1/76 3" mortar carrier.
by anychance your in USA? want to try something with single edge blade and need just one, will buy it fron you if you want. I know you said aboutthe holes, but want to re do something in chopper.
thx

Ruslan.
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Robert Lockie
Robert Lockie

January 29th, 2005, 7:55 pm #10

I just bought the double edge razor blades in the supermarket - they are used for shaving with the old type of single blade razors where the head is dismantled and the blade reassembled inside it. I think mine were Wilkinson or Gilette - a shaving razor manufacturer anyway. I never found they were hard to get (unlike single edge ones, which I had to buy from Micro Mark in the US).
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