Liquid Gun Blue as an Alternative to Blacken-It

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Liquid Gun Blue as an Alternative to Blacken-It

Joined: January 31st, 2009, 1:06 am

January 10th, 2012, 7:27 pm #1

Hi all,

Someone else might have already come upon this, but a recent experiment with Birchwood Casey liquid gun blue solutions, "Super Blue" and "Perma Blue," have shown that both are good alternatives to Blacken-It for coloring Fruil metal tracks.



Rather than re-post and repeat all of the details, here's a link to a thread that I just started on Armorama about it:

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op= ... =1#1565393

I can't imagine that I'm the first person to ever hit on this, so the credit may well belong to someone else. But if you're lookig for an easy to find and cheaper alternative (at least in the US) to Blacken-It, this stuff works! It's even available at my local Walmart!

Happy Modeling,
Mike
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Joined: October 16th, 2005, 9:53 pm

January 10th, 2012, 8:38 pm #2

Hey Mike,

Great news there. I wondered about using Gun Blue, but never actually tried it probably since I don't work a whole lot with Fruil tracks, though I have some in the stash.

Thanks for sharing and take care!

Cheers!

chuckw
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Joined: November 8th, 2003, 4:32 am

January 10th, 2012, 9:00 pm #3

Hi all,

Someone else might have already come upon this, but a recent experiment with Birchwood Casey liquid gun blue solutions, "Super Blue" and "Perma Blue," have shown that both are good alternatives to Blacken-It for coloring Fruil metal tracks.



Rather than re-post and repeat all of the details, here's a link to a thread that I just started on Armorama about it:

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op= ... =1#1565393

I can't imagine that I'm the first person to ever hit on this, so the credit may well belong to someone else. But if you're lookig for an easy to find and cheaper alternative (at least in the US) to Blacken-It, this stuff works! It's even available at my local Walmart!

Happy Modeling,
Mike
nt
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Joined: January 22nd, 2005, 10:18 pm

January 10th, 2012, 9:01 pm #4

Hi all,

Someone else might have already come upon this, but a recent experiment with Birchwood Casey liquid gun blue solutions, "Super Blue" and "Perma Blue," have shown that both are good alternatives to Blacken-It for coloring Fruil metal tracks.



Rather than re-post and repeat all of the details, here's a link to a thread that I just started on Armorama about it:

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op= ... =1#1565393

I can't imagine that I'm the first person to ever hit on this, so the credit may well belong to someone else. But if you're lookig for an easy to find and cheaper alternative (at least in the US) to Blacken-It, this stuff works! It's even available at my local Walmart!

Happy Modeling,
Mike
"Tanks" for the scoop.
Outta here, Mike sends . . .
Last edited by Michael Mummey on January 10th, 2012, 9:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 21st, 2011, 10:03 pm

January 11th, 2012, 12:36 am #5

Hi all,

Someone else might have already come upon this, but a recent experiment with Birchwood Casey liquid gun blue solutions, "Super Blue" and "Perma Blue," have shown that both are good alternatives to Blacken-It for coloring Fruil metal tracks.



Rather than re-post and repeat all of the details, here's a link to a thread that I just started on Armorama about it:

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op= ... =1#1565393

I can't imagine that I'm the first person to ever hit on this, so the credit may well belong to someone else. But if you're lookig for an easy to find and cheaper alternative (at least in the US) to Blacken-It, this stuff works! It's even available at my local Walmart!

Happy Modeling,
Mike
This could not have come at a better time! I tried Blacken It for the first time recently with mixed results. One question - did you prepare the metal tracks the same as you would before using Blacken It? Did you soak them in vinegar or anything like that? Seems like a great alternative at the right price. Thanks Mike!
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Joined: August 13th, 2009, 8:53 pm

January 11th, 2012, 3:20 am #6

otherwise known as trisodium phoshate, is a cleaning/degreasing solution I use to clean, and strip old finishes on gun parts, prior to refinishing them.

TSP can be purchased in any decent hardware store. It comes in the form of a white crystalline powder.

Required equipment:

1. A 3 1/2 quart stainless steel cooking pot (don't worry about using what's in the kitchen. The TSP won't be absorbed by the pot )

2. A stainless steel mesh strainer



the kind used for straining pasta and liquids

3. TSP

4. An old toothbrush for scrubbing between the crevices

5. A gallon of distilled water. NOT tap or bottled water; since, both types contain impurities

6. Rubber or latex gloves (for handling the cleaned/degreased tracks. touching the traks with your bare fingers will recontaminate the tracks with body oils and prevent the bluing solution to adhere to that area)


Once you assemble your tracks, boil a potful of water, adding 8 tablespoons of TSP . When the solution starts to boil, place the assembled tracks into the strainer; then, place the strainer into the pot. After about five minutes, lift the strainer out of the pot and thoroughly scrub the tracks. Make sure that you scrub in the crevices to remove all the grease on the tracks. Repeat these steps four or five times to insure complete degreasing.

After you've cleaned the tracks, rinse them thoroughly with the distilled water to remove any leftover residue. Whan that is done, lay the cleaned tracks out on some paper towels to dry them. You can use a blow dryer to speed up the process. Use the rubber or latex gloves when handling the tracks for the aforementioned reasons.

Once the tracks are completely dry, you can apply the bluing/blacking solution of your choice. After bluing, sit back and admire your fancy-schmancy new tracks.

It might seem a bit involved; but, you can accomplish everything in less than an hour and a half.
Last edited by Joe Zrodlowski on January 11th, 2012, 3:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 31st, 2009, 1:06 am

January 11th, 2012, 3:07 pm #7

This could not have come at a better time! I tried Blacken It for the first time recently with mixed results. One question - did you prepare the metal tracks the same as you would before using Blacken It? Did you soak them in vinegar or anything like that? Seems like a great alternative at the right price. Thanks Mike!
Hi Gregg,

I confess to a bit of laziness with my little experiment and did not clean or degrease the test tracks at all.

Normally, I just degrease the Fruils with a quick dip into either lacquer thinner or acetone. I've tried the "pre-pickeling" with vinegar, but didn't notice any improvement in the results, so I quit doing that.

However, after reading Joe Z's TSP cleaning method (below), I might give that a try. (Wooden deck cleaner being a staple around my house; I've always got the TSP on hand.)

One thing that I liked about the liquid gun blue was that it didn't leave the un-colored spots (usually found in the faces of the track links where the webbing is) that Blacken-It often leaves behind no matter how much scrubbing before and agitation during that I've used. I had always assumed that these spots were the result of air bubbles trapped in the track links and that extra agitiation would take care of them.

However, the liquid gun blue seemed to have gotten down into those al of those areas with no extra work (I really did just stir the tracks around a bit with a toothpick - that's all I did during their soak in the liquid bluing), so I'm definitely using it on the next set of Fruils I build.

Mike
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