Is there a certain blade that'll sheer off hard-to-reach parts?

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Is there a certain blade that'll sheer off hard-to-reach parts?

Rod Hayes
Rod Hayes

April 9th, 2005, 9:16 pm #1

Yes. This is to do w/ working in PE parts with a 1/72 scale Panzer IV J by Revell. I'm trying to turn this into something. But there are copper parts offered, but the only way to involve them is to reach in certain areas and sheer off oversized parts that are in the Revell Panzer's initial mold. You want to do away with them without committing any structural damage, or just play it safe and stick with the kit parts in this area. I'd like to get my money's worth and work in as many copper parts as is necessary. Is there such a cutting blade for designed for a zacto knife that will assist here? - because I'm not about to try and sheer off these parts up front on the hull of this Panzer IV J. The standard zacto blade is just too big to do the job. It'll make a mess. If you can help me, thanks.
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Rod Hayes
Rod Hayes

April 9th, 2005, 9:33 pm #2

I ran the process of annealing Part's PE parts for the Revell Panzer IV J last night. Now, they have black soot on the tiny metal etched pieces. What is done next if anything? Do you ignore this and go on? Or is there a cleaning process that goes with PE parts having this ashy, black soot covering them? Or are the metal parts fine and totally OK to be glued on to the plastic tank? I'm in the dark on this. I can't tell, but - whether good or bad - the PE parts have soot on them now.
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Dave Foster
Dave Foster

April 10th, 2005, 7:21 am #3

You have not annealed the parts if they have soot on them. To anneal you must get the parts to cherry red, by which temp the soot will have burnt off.

What heat source are you using?

Parts that have soot on them should be easily cleaned by washing and or rubbing but that does not alter the fact that the parts are not annealed.

Your initial request about a tool for removing detail; - there are tools available, I have a real cheap Chinese 'craft knife set' that has small chisel like bits that fit a pin chuck. An art supply shop could probably help with lino cutting tools etc.

Regards Dave
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Rod Hayes
Rod Hayes

April 10th, 2005, 4:45 pm #4

That inlcudes soaking metal parts in vinegar, wash them off with hot water, allow for dry air, and then reheat the PE parts allowing them to become cherry red?

By the way, my heat source was a lit candle, holding the copper set over a lit candle.

Thanks.
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Alasdair K Johnston
Alasdair K Johnston

April 10th, 2005, 9:06 pm #5

Hi meths or Iso will do and just rubb it of prior to bending.....you should always dip the part in this before sticking it on anyway to make sure hand oils deposited whilst bending are cleaned off..

Try buying a refil lighter or a cheep kitchen blow tourch ....you will not get the soot that way....just take care not to over heat the part....its not hard to see the colour change then just whip the part out of the flame....or let go of the lighters gas leaver...

I use one of those jet lighters...I think some wags calls them 'crack' lighters in the US. They are fantastic as the heat jet is very directional...and they refill from a tin of ligher gas.
(Gas = LPG not petrol like a Zippo)...

Alasdiar
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Rod Hayes
Rod Hayes

April 11th, 2005, 9:34 pm #6

Hi, those terms confuse me. I tried heating up the PE only to find the soot still on them afterwards. The time before when I used a small torch with a PE set for a US GMC truck back in December, the parts were annealed. Still, I was wanting to try a milder source for flame. Some insiders here advised the use of a lit candle. That's fire and made sense enough for me. Still, I came up with carbon / soot coating the copper parts from the Part kit for the Revell Panzer IV J. Yesterday, I went as far as trying to reheat the parts with the same candle, and then with a lighter. Same results. So, I began to try and wash away the soot. A lot of the soot is gone, but it still coats the set. It does seem that the copper sheet changed colors some when I compare its color to the previous set that was absolutely annealed back in December. It sounds like I must go back to using the torch, yet I'm fascinated with using a milder source of flame. The torch poses a risk of overheating. Anyway, I need to clean up these parts. I feel that they have been annealed enough and should be fine. There are many parts, but the end result should improve the Revell Panzer IV J. Still, I'm not working on sooty PE parts. It'll alter the color of the parts when the painting is done as that black soot will mix in with the German dark yellow making for a dirty vehicle. Please elaborate on the Iso and Meth to clean this up with. Thanks.
Rod
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david nickels
david nickels

April 11th, 2005, 10:00 pm #7

nt
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Joined: April 10th, 2005, 11:34 pm

April 12th, 2005, 2:38 am #8

I refer to Minerralised Methyalated Sprits = Meths. The same stuff you but in small flame burners etc. Or Iso which is Rubbing alcohol in the USA I think.

Alasdair
Alasdair K Johnston
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David Nickels
David Nickels

April 12th, 2005, 12:54 pm #9

Denatured Alcohol.... used in Bunson Burners, etc. Is a good thinner for acrylic paints, too.
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Joined: April 10th, 2005, 11:34 pm

April 12th, 2005, 2:45 pm #10

Yep....cheep....I use it for washing down proir to painting as well....just dont smaoke
Cheers David


AJ
Alasdair K Johnston
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