Has anyone seen this approach before ?

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Has anyone seen this approach before ?

Matt Chant
Matt Chant

April 17th, 2002, 7:19 pm #1

I have a whole bunch of dio ideas in my head, most of which never get built. After reading Warrens recent 10 commandments, I realized that most of them were based around the concept of finding a suitable way of displaying some particular piece of hardware, which may not be the right approach.
So I got to thinking about a slightly different way of going about it, but I've never seen this before, and I'de appreciate any thoughts before I get around to firing up the old Dremel.

I have this idea for a pair of dios to be displayed side by side (unless I can work out how to do this on one base).
The first dio should be representative of the German Army circa '39-'40. The original plan was a Pz II or III leading a squad of men across a field of tallish grass. Everything should reflect a newness and boldness. Minimal weathering, all the equiptment in good repair, careful use of bright colour (Air recognition panels, wildflowers and so on).
The second dio should be representative of '44-'45
The original plan was a small group of soldiers retreating passed a knocked out tank. Everthing should reflect despair and hopelessness. Everthing is heavily weathered, no colours, everything is muted. Figures all look worn out and haggard, maybe some bandaged wounds.

So that was the original plan. After reading the 10 Commandments I had a rethink. The 'story' is in the figures and the way they are presented. The armour really just helps set the scene. By following the Pz II with its TC in view, it shows that these figures are advancing ready to attack, rather than strolling along.
By walking in the opposite direction to a knocked out vehicle, it re-inforces retreat and looming disaster.
But adding the vehicles adds to the overall size and I think would distract the viewer into looking at the vehicles rather than the overall storyline.
So, here's my (potentially) novel idea I'de like input on.
Based on the way you set scenes in film, television, stage and even photographs and paintings , you don't necessarily have to include everything to make the point. If these dios were paintings, you wouldn't paint the entire tank, you'de only include enough of it to set the scene, leaving the viewer to imagine the rest and concentrate on the central figures. Could I do the same in a dio ? Could I take a Dremel and razor saw to a Pz II and only display the back third ? Could I razor off the front left corner of a Panther and place it in the corner of the second dio ?
It seems an odd thing to do, but then we do it with buildings all the time. My thinking is that it will help shrink the dio down to its main theme, and yet still provide the 'background' that I'm looking for.

So am I crazy ?

Thanks,
Matt
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Charles Reading
Charles Reading

April 17th, 2002, 11:46 pm #2

At Panzer Mrosko's book "Panzer Tactics" He discribes the method to achieve exactly what you are talking about. He ever offers some good tips on how to cut up a model without having it fall apart in your hands.
C
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Pekka Kerttula
Pekka Kerttula

April 18th, 2002, 6:52 am #3

I have a whole bunch of dio ideas in my head, most of which never get built. After reading Warrens recent 10 commandments, I realized that most of them were based around the concept of finding a suitable way of displaying some particular piece of hardware, which may not be the right approach.
So I got to thinking about a slightly different way of going about it, but I've never seen this before, and I'de appreciate any thoughts before I get around to firing up the old Dremel.

I have this idea for a pair of dios to be displayed side by side (unless I can work out how to do this on one base).
The first dio should be representative of the German Army circa '39-'40. The original plan was a Pz II or III leading a squad of men across a field of tallish grass. Everything should reflect a newness and boldness. Minimal weathering, all the equiptment in good repair, careful use of bright colour (Air recognition panels, wildflowers and so on).
The second dio should be representative of '44-'45
The original plan was a small group of soldiers retreating passed a knocked out tank. Everthing should reflect despair and hopelessness. Everthing is heavily weathered, no colours, everything is muted. Figures all look worn out and haggard, maybe some bandaged wounds.

So that was the original plan. After reading the 10 Commandments I had a rethink. The 'story' is in the figures and the way they are presented. The armour really just helps set the scene. By following the Pz II with its TC in view, it shows that these figures are advancing ready to attack, rather than strolling along.
By walking in the opposite direction to a knocked out vehicle, it re-inforces retreat and looming disaster.
But adding the vehicles adds to the overall size and I think would distract the viewer into looking at the vehicles rather than the overall storyline.
So, here's my (potentially) novel idea I'de like input on.
Based on the way you set scenes in film, television, stage and even photographs and paintings , you don't necessarily have to include everything to make the point. If these dios were paintings, you wouldn't paint the entire tank, you'de only include enough of it to set the scene, leaving the viewer to imagine the rest and concentrate on the central figures. Could I do the same in a dio ? Could I take a Dremel and razor saw to a Pz II and only display the back third ? Could I razor off the front left corner of a Panther and place it in the corner of the second dio ?
It seems an odd thing to do, but then we do it with buildings all the time. My thinking is that it will help shrink the dio down to its main theme, and yet still provide the 'background' that I'm looking for.

So am I crazy ?

Thanks,
Matt
And you would, of course, scratchbuild the interior of the cut-away tank, visible from the side ?!
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Frank Michaels
Frank Michaels

April 18th, 2002, 10:48 am #4

I have a whole bunch of dio ideas in my head, most of which never get built. After reading Warrens recent 10 commandments, I realized that most of them were based around the concept of finding a suitable way of displaying some particular piece of hardware, which may not be the right approach.
So I got to thinking about a slightly different way of going about it, but I've never seen this before, and I'de appreciate any thoughts before I get around to firing up the old Dremel.

I have this idea for a pair of dios to be displayed side by side (unless I can work out how to do this on one base).
The first dio should be representative of the German Army circa '39-'40. The original plan was a Pz II or III leading a squad of men across a field of tallish grass. Everything should reflect a newness and boldness. Minimal weathering, all the equiptment in good repair, careful use of bright colour (Air recognition panels, wildflowers and so on).
The second dio should be representative of '44-'45
The original plan was a small group of soldiers retreating passed a knocked out tank. Everthing should reflect despair and hopelessness. Everthing is heavily weathered, no colours, everything is muted. Figures all look worn out and haggard, maybe some bandaged wounds.

So that was the original plan. After reading the 10 Commandments I had a rethink. The 'story' is in the figures and the way they are presented. The armour really just helps set the scene. By following the Pz II with its TC in view, it shows that these figures are advancing ready to attack, rather than strolling along.
By walking in the opposite direction to a knocked out vehicle, it re-inforces retreat and looming disaster.
But adding the vehicles adds to the overall size and I think would distract the viewer into looking at the vehicles rather than the overall storyline.
So, here's my (potentially) novel idea I'de like input on.
Based on the way you set scenes in film, television, stage and even photographs and paintings , you don't necessarily have to include everything to make the point. If these dios were paintings, you wouldn't paint the entire tank, you'de only include enough of it to set the scene, leaving the viewer to imagine the rest and concentrate on the central figures. Could I do the same in a dio ? Could I take a Dremel and razor saw to a Pz II and only display the back third ? Could I razor off the front left corner of a Panther and place it in the corner of the second dio ?
It seems an odd thing to do, but then we do it with buildings all the time. My thinking is that it will help shrink the dio down to its main theme, and yet still provide the 'background' that I'm looking for.

So am I crazy ?

Thanks,
Matt
Start building shadow boxes and you will solve your dilemma....
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Patrick Deschênes
Patrick Deschênes

April 19th, 2002, 4:15 pm #5

I have a whole bunch of dio ideas in my head, most of which never get built. After reading Warrens recent 10 commandments, I realized that most of them were based around the concept of finding a suitable way of displaying some particular piece of hardware, which may not be the right approach.
So I got to thinking about a slightly different way of going about it, but I've never seen this before, and I'de appreciate any thoughts before I get around to firing up the old Dremel.

I have this idea for a pair of dios to be displayed side by side (unless I can work out how to do this on one base).
The first dio should be representative of the German Army circa '39-'40. The original plan was a Pz II or III leading a squad of men across a field of tallish grass. Everything should reflect a newness and boldness. Minimal weathering, all the equiptment in good repair, careful use of bright colour (Air recognition panels, wildflowers and so on).
The second dio should be representative of '44-'45
The original plan was a small group of soldiers retreating passed a knocked out tank. Everthing should reflect despair and hopelessness. Everthing is heavily weathered, no colours, everything is muted. Figures all look worn out and haggard, maybe some bandaged wounds.

So that was the original plan. After reading the 10 Commandments I had a rethink. The 'story' is in the figures and the way they are presented. The armour really just helps set the scene. By following the Pz II with its TC in view, it shows that these figures are advancing ready to attack, rather than strolling along.
By walking in the opposite direction to a knocked out vehicle, it re-inforces retreat and looming disaster.
But adding the vehicles adds to the overall size and I think would distract the viewer into looking at the vehicles rather than the overall storyline.
So, here's my (potentially) novel idea I'de like input on.
Based on the way you set scenes in film, television, stage and even photographs and paintings , you don't necessarily have to include everything to make the point. If these dios were paintings, you wouldn't paint the entire tank, you'de only include enough of it to set the scene, leaving the viewer to imagine the rest and concentrate on the central figures. Could I do the same in a dio ? Could I take a Dremel and razor saw to a Pz II and only display the back third ? Could I razor off the front left corner of a Panther and place it in the corner of the second dio ?
It seems an odd thing to do, but then we do it with buildings all the time. My thinking is that it will help shrink the dio down to its main theme, and yet still provide the 'background' that I'm looking for.

So am I crazy ?

Thanks,
Matt
An idea struck me when I read your plan for the 39-40/44-45 "reversal of fortune" diorama.

You could use a common base for the two eras, with a destroyed 7TP polish tank as the center piece(I know that Mirage has a 1/35 kit, although not a very good one).

On the 39-40 side, you could have the 7TP tank as a "fresh kill", with a clean panzer and German soldiers glancing at it while they pass by (maybe a few soldier climbed on it while another take pictures). The surrounding field could be undamaged tall grass and everything seems sunny. On the 44-45 side, you could have the same hulk but heavily weathered and rusted, while you have the germans with heads bowed walking past it in the opposite direction, with the field trampled and made muddy by many passing vehicles. You could even have an ambulance or a beat-up tank drive past as well.

Idealy, the 7TP tank would be the same for both sides of the diorama, with different weathering and damage done to both sides (it would have a demarkation down the middle)

This seems a like a good idea (I haven't given it much thought yet!) and maybe it would be too ambitious a project.

What do you think?
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Joined: February 9th, 2002, 5:42 pm

April 19th, 2002, 7:16 pm #6

I have a whole bunch of dio ideas in my head, most of which never get built. After reading Warrens recent 10 commandments, I realized that most of them were based around the concept of finding a suitable way of displaying some particular piece of hardware, which may not be the right approach.
So I got to thinking about a slightly different way of going about it, but I've never seen this before, and I'de appreciate any thoughts before I get around to firing up the old Dremel.

I have this idea for a pair of dios to be displayed side by side (unless I can work out how to do this on one base).
The first dio should be representative of the German Army circa '39-'40. The original plan was a Pz II or III leading a squad of men across a field of tallish grass. Everything should reflect a newness and boldness. Minimal weathering, all the equiptment in good repair, careful use of bright colour (Air recognition panels, wildflowers and so on).
The second dio should be representative of '44-'45
The original plan was a small group of soldiers retreating passed a knocked out tank. Everthing should reflect despair and hopelessness. Everthing is heavily weathered, no colours, everything is muted. Figures all look worn out and haggard, maybe some bandaged wounds.

So that was the original plan. After reading the 10 Commandments I had a rethink. The 'story' is in the figures and the way they are presented. The armour really just helps set the scene. By following the Pz II with its TC in view, it shows that these figures are advancing ready to attack, rather than strolling along.
By walking in the opposite direction to a knocked out vehicle, it re-inforces retreat and looming disaster.
But adding the vehicles adds to the overall size and I think would distract the viewer into looking at the vehicles rather than the overall storyline.
So, here's my (potentially) novel idea I'de like input on.
Based on the way you set scenes in film, television, stage and even photographs and paintings , you don't necessarily have to include everything to make the point. If these dios were paintings, you wouldn't paint the entire tank, you'de only include enough of it to set the scene, leaving the viewer to imagine the rest and concentrate on the central figures. Could I do the same in a dio ? Could I take a Dremel and razor saw to a Pz II and only display the back third ? Could I razor off the front left corner of a Panther and place it in the corner of the second dio ?
It seems an odd thing to do, but then we do it with buildings all the time. My thinking is that it will help shrink the dio down to its main theme, and yet still provide the 'background' that I'm looking for.

So am I crazy ?

Thanks,
Matt
Hello Matt,
About your thinking to saw your models in pieces...
I have seen it before in a book or magazine, but i dunno what magazine it was
Maybe it was Military modeling but i am not sure.
There they filled the kit with pur foam (i dont know if thats the English word) The isolation foam.
So the vehicle was much stronger and it was easier to saw it.. the foam could be painted later on.
Maybe somebody else knows the source of the article.

Hope this helps.
Happy weekend,
Herman
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Joined: January 26th, 2002, 7:03 am

April 19th, 2002, 11:58 pm #7

I have a whole bunch of dio ideas in my head, most of which never get built. After reading Warrens recent 10 commandments, I realized that most of them were based around the concept of finding a suitable way of displaying some particular piece of hardware, which may not be the right approach.
So I got to thinking about a slightly different way of going about it, but I've never seen this before, and I'de appreciate any thoughts before I get around to firing up the old Dremel.

I have this idea for a pair of dios to be displayed side by side (unless I can work out how to do this on one base).
The first dio should be representative of the German Army circa '39-'40. The original plan was a Pz II or III leading a squad of men across a field of tallish grass. Everything should reflect a newness and boldness. Minimal weathering, all the equiptment in good repair, careful use of bright colour (Air recognition panels, wildflowers and so on).
The second dio should be representative of '44-'45
The original plan was a small group of soldiers retreating passed a knocked out tank. Everthing should reflect despair and hopelessness. Everthing is heavily weathered, no colours, everything is muted. Figures all look worn out and haggard, maybe some bandaged wounds.

So that was the original plan. After reading the 10 Commandments I had a rethink. The 'story' is in the figures and the way they are presented. The armour really just helps set the scene. By following the Pz II with its TC in view, it shows that these figures are advancing ready to attack, rather than strolling along.
By walking in the opposite direction to a knocked out vehicle, it re-inforces retreat and looming disaster.
But adding the vehicles adds to the overall size and I think would distract the viewer into looking at the vehicles rather than the overall storyline.
So, here's my (potentially) novel idea I'de like input on.
Based on the way you set scenes in film, television, stage and even photographs and paintings , you don't necessarily have to include everything to make the point. If these dios were paintings, you wouldn't paint the entire tank, you'de only include enough of it to set the scene, leaving the viewer to imagine the rest and concentrate on the central figures. Could I do the same in a dio ? Could I take a Dremel and razor saw to a Pz II and only display the back third ? Could I razor off the front left corner of a Panther and place it in the corner of the second dio ?
It seems an odd thing to do, but then we do it with buildings all the time. My thinking is that it will help shrink the dio down to its main theme, and yet still provide the 'background' that I'm looking for.

So am I crazy ?

Thanks,
Matt
sorry, but cutting up vehicles and using them in the background is VERY common amongst figure modellers who deal with smaller bases than AFV modellers do. even the idea of "the same location" at different times of the war has been done a number of times, most famously by Bob Letterman with Legacies I & II. so although these are good ideas, they are not new ideas.

Gray Creager
asicsucces@86yahoo.com - "86" the 86.
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Joined: February 6th, 2002, 9:08 pm

May 1st, 2002, 6:25 pm #8

I have a whole bunch of dio ideas in my head, most of which never get built. After reading Warrens recent 10 commandments, I realized that most of them were based around the concept of finding a suitable way of displaying some particular piece of hardware, which may not be the right approach.
So I got to thinking about a slightly different way of going about it, but I've never seen this before, and I'de appreciate any thoughts before I get around to firing up the old Dremel.

I have this idea for a pair of dios to be displayed side by side (unless I can work out how to do this on one base).
The first dio should be representative of the German Army circa '39-'40. The original plan was a Pz II or III leading a squad of men across a field of tallish grass. Everything should reflect a newness and boldness. Minimal weathering, all the equiptment in good repair, careful use of bright colour (Air recognition panels, wildflowers and so on).
The second dio should be representative of '44-'45
The original plan was a small group of soldiers retreating passed a knocked out tank. Everthing should reflect despair and hopelessness. Everthing is heavily weathered, no colours, everything is muted. Figures all look worn out and haggard, maybe some bandaged wounds.

So that was the original plan. After reading the 10 Commandments I had a rethink. The 'story' is in the figures and the way they are presented. The armour really just helps set the scene. By following the Pz II with its TC in view, it shows that these figures are advancing ready to attack, rather than strolling along.
By walking in the opposite direction to a knocked out vehicle, it re-inforces retreat and looming disaster.
But adding the vehicles adds to the overall size and I think would distract the viewer into looking at the vehicles rather than the overall storyline.
So, here's my (potentially) novel idea I'de like input on.
Based on the way you set scenes in film, television, stage and even photographs and paintings , you don't necessarily have to include everything to make the point. If these dios were paintings, you wouldn't paint the entire tank, you'de only include enough of it to set the scene, leaving the viewer to imagine the rest and concentrate on the central figures. Could I do the same in a dio ? Could I take a Dremel and razor saw to a Pz II and only display the back third ? Could I razor off the front left corner of a Panther and place it in the corner of the second dio ?
It seems an odd thing to do, but then we do it with buildings all the time. My thinking is that it will help shrink the dio down to its main theme, and yet still provide the 'background' that I'm looking for.

So am I crazy ?

Thanks,
Matt
Why not make them into bookends. The upright on each end which holds the books is the back wall of the cut vehicle. The early party can be marching out from the bookend, the later group marching in. For a contest put a copy of "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" between the ends.
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