Ground work help

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Ground work help

Steve Kubik
Steve Kubik

December 15th, 2001, 9:25 pm #1

I need some help and advice, guys. I'm looking for an alternative to using Celluclay as my ground work. I'm tired of the stuff shrinking on my bases. I could deal with it cracking, but the shrinking and curling is driving me nuts.

I remember in some previous posts that some of you have used pollyfilla, but I can't seem to find it here in the States. What is it? Does it have a different name here? Is there something similar that I can use?

Thanks in advance,
Steve
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Matt Tingley
Matt Tingley

December 15th, 2001, 9:42 pm #2

I've never had problems with curling or crakcing. Just curious.
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khaled el adem
khaled el adem

December 15th, 2001, 11:32 pm #3

I need some help and advice, guys. I'm looking for an alternative to using Celluclay as my ground work. I'm tired of the stuff shrinking on my bases. I could deal with it cracking, but the shrinking and curling is driving me nuts.

I remember in some previous posts that some of you have used pollyfilla, but I can't seem to find it here in the States. What is it? Does it have a different name here? Is there something similar that I can use?

Thanks in advance,
Steve
hello i am from lebanon, a fan of ww2 diorama, i think you will have to add a litle of lemon juice in the mixt so the time of hardening will be long.
and if you want you can add to the celluclay some find sand + some plaster . this is the way i work it
ok?
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Steve Kubik
Steve Kubik

December 16th, 2001, 12:39 am #4

I've never had problems with curling or crakcing. Just curious.
I mix the celluclay with water and some white glue. I use a food processor to really get the stuff mixed well.

Then, I use white glue when I apply it to the base. The base, I might add, is pine. I stain it, then apply two coats of Spar Urethane to seal it.

Steve
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Steve Kubik
Steve Kubik

December 16th, 2001, 12:41 am #5

hello i am from lebanon, a fan of ww2 diorama, i think you will have to add a litle of lemon juice in the mixt so the time of hardening will be long.
and if you want you can add to the celluclay some find sand + some plaster . this is the way i work it
ok?
I hadn't heard of using this. This really prevents it from curling and cracking? How much jice do you add?

Steve
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Kevin Keefe
Kevin Keefe

December 16th, 2001, 6:43 pm #6

I need some help and advice, guys. I'm looking for an alternative to using Celluclay as my ground work. I'm tired of the stuff shrinking on my bases. I could deal with it cracking, but the shrinking and curling is driving me nuts.

I remember in some previous posts that some of you have used pollyfilla, but I can't seem to find it here in the States. What is it? Does it have a different name here? Is there something similar that I can use?

Thanks in advance,
Steve
Steve,

I gave up on Celluclay's shrinking and curling a long time ago. Switched over to a similar product called Sculptamold and have really been happy with that. I have noticed NO shrinking, nor has any of my ground works curled over the years. It mixes the same way, comes in a good size bag and will last a long time. I use about a 75% mix of white glue to water, and although it still takes time to air-dry, I don't think that it takes as long as Celluclay does to dry. Dries real hard too. Only draw-back (if you can call it that) is that it is very white. I swear by the stuff!

Not sure where you're located, but it is available in Marlborough Massachusetts at the Spare Time Shop.

HTH,
Thanks,
Kevin Keefe
http://www.mortarsinminiature.com
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Tom Terblanche
Tom Terblanche

December 18th, 2001, 10:03 pm #7

Polyfilla is used for filling cracks in cemnet walls etc. It is a powder based material that is mixed with water. It is very similar to Spackle.

Hope this helps.

Tom
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Ian MacAulay
Ian MacAulay

December 18th, 2001, 10:26 pm #8

I haven't got a clue if this is a cause of your problem, but anything like a food processor whips a lot of air into whatever it's mixing. Perhaps it is this air that is causing the cracking? Just a thought.
FWIW
Ian MacAulay
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada
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Barry Beaudry
Barry Beaudry

December 23rd, 2001, 1:30 am #9

Steve,

I gave up on Celluclay's shrinking and curling a long time ago. Switched over to a similar product called Sculptamold and have really been happy with that. I have noticed NO shrinking, nor has any of my ground works curled over the years. It mixes the same way, comes in a good size bag and will last a long time. I use about a 75% mix of white glue to water, and although it still takes time to air-dry, I don't think that it takes as long as Celluclay does to dry. Dries real hard too. Only draw-back (if you can call it that) is that it is very white. I swear by the stuff!

Not sure where you're located, but it is available in Marlborough Massachusetts at the Spare Time Shop.

HTH,
Thanks,
Kevin Keefe
http://www.mortarsinminiature.com
Hello Kevin,

I love that Sculptamold, much better then Celluclay, in my humble opinion of course.

I add cheap craft store chocolate brown with black acrylic paint to darken it. It dries lighter than you expect, that is why I add the black to help darken it.

Yup love that Sculptamold.

HTH
Barry Beaudry


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Kevin Keefe
Kevin Keefe

December 27th, 2001, 4:15 pm #10

Hi Barry,

Yep, that stuff is much better than Celluclay. Been using it for years.

Although I'm aware of mixing paints in to tint it some, I've never done it as I always thought that it might effect the drying process. I put it on 'as is' and give it a good coat of primer once it has dried. I even prime over the set-in stones etc, then I take it from there.

Glad to hear that you like it also. I don't know how anyone gets good results from Celluclay. I mean it looks good and all, and it's easy to work with, but the shrinkage problems associated with it (my experiences anyway) turned me off a long time ago.

Thanks,
Kevin Keefe
http://www.mortarsinminiature.com
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