Feeling the cold

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Feeling the cold

Callum Duffy
Callum Duffy

August 11th, 2004, 5:33 pm #1

I recently brought the dragon set 'Winter combat'. I want to incorporate them into a diorama set in snow. Ive never attempted to replicate snow before ive heard tha biocarbonate of soda looks the business, can anyone suggest the best thing to use?

Thanks in advance
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Callum Duffy
Callum Duffy

August 11th, 2004, 6:13 pm #2

Crap i meant baking soda
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Joined: July 13th, 2004, 1:39 am

August 12th, 2004, 1:24 am #3

I recently brought the dragon set 'Winter combat'. I want to incorporate them into a diorama set in snow. Ive never attempted to replicate snow before ive heard tha biocarbonate of soda looks the business, can anyone suggest the best thing to use?

Thanks in advance
is the best stuff to ose. It is made of a substance called Microbaloons. It looks and acts hust like snow. Check it out here at Great Models Webstore http://www.greatmodels.com/cgi/display. ... um=wssn140

Looks like this:

All you do is apply some glue to the area you want snow on, sprinle it on, then blow off the excess. Add more glue and snow to make deeper areas.

Here is the finished product on my Chosin Resevior Dio:



Gino P. Quintiliani

Field Artillery --- The KING of BATTLE!!!
<a href=http://www.armorama.com/modules/photopo ... eavyArty's Showcase</a>
Field Artillery --- The KING of BATTLE!!!

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell
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Joined: June 12th, 2004, 11:07 pm

August 12th, 2004, 4:02 am #4

I recently brought the dragon set 'Winter combat'. I want to incorporate them into a diorama set in snow. Ive never attempted to replicate snow before ive heard tha biocarbonate of soda looks the business, can anyone suggest the best thing to use?

Thanks in advance
Although I have never used artificial snow products (and so cannot say if they are that much better), baking soda is terrific (and cheap!!!) for modeling cold weather snow (fine, not sticky). As for durability, I have had baking soda on a diorama for about 5 years, in a naturally lit room, without any problems like yellowing or coagulation. The real question is whether you wish to have cold (December/January Russia) or warm (Spring melt, mild) weather snow...
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The Small Shop EU
The Small Shop EU

August 12th, 2004, 5:20 pm #5

is the best stuff to ose. It is made of a substance called Microbaloons. It looks and acts hust like snow. Check it out here at Great Models Webstore http://www.greatmodels.com/cgi/display. ... um=wssn140

Looks like this:

All you do is apply some glue to the area you want snow on, sprinle it on, then blow off the excess. Add more glue and snow to make deeper areas.

Here is the finished product on my Chosin Resevior Dio:



Gino P. Quintiliani

Field Artillery --- The KING of BATTLE!!!
<a href=http://www.armorama.com/modules/photopo ... eavyArty's Showcase</a>
http://www.greatmodels.com/cgi/display. ... um=sshsnow



Alasdair
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Callum Duffy
Callum Duffy

August 13th, 2004, 4:52 pm #6

Although I have never used artificial snow products (and so cannot say if they are that much better), baking soda is terrific (and cheap!!!) for modeling cold weather snow (fine, not sticky). As for durability, I have had baking soda on a diorama for about 5 years, in a naturally lit room, without any problems like yellowing or coagulation. The real question is whether you wish to have cold (December/January Russia) or warm (Spring melt, mild) weather snow...
Thanks alot guys, the helpfullness of moderlers never ceases to amaze me everyone is so willing to help each other out. i was thinking along the lines of a russian winter with fresh snow fall. thanks for the help.
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Timothy Grier
Timothy Grier

August 14th, 2004, 4:27 pm #7

Although I have never used artificial snow products (and so cannot say if they are that much better), baking soda is terrific (and cheap!!!) for modeling cold weather snow (fine, not sticky). As for durability, I have had baking soda on a diorama for about 5 years, in a naturally lit room, without any problems like yellowing or coagulation. The real question is whether you wish to have cold (December/January Russia) or warm (Spring melt, mild) weather snow...
I am finishing up a winter diorama myself and have a question about your baking soda technique. I am stationed at Camp Lejeune, in North Carolina. Its located on the coast of eastern Carolina....it gets humid here. Will the humidity cause the baking soda to "swell"? Do you seal your Baking Soda with anything (i.e. Dullcote)? Thanks in advance.

Semper Fidelis,
Tim
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Joined: July 13th, 2004, 1:39 am

August 14th, 2004, 5:44 pm #8

I used to live in FL, can we say humid? I had problems with the baking soda ding just that. It absorbed the humity and eventually began to mold. I have used the Woodland Scenics Snow ever since. The stuff is great.

Gino P. Quintiliani

Field Artillery --- The KING of BATTLE!!!
<a href=http://www.armorama.com/modules/photopo ... eavyArty's Showcase</a>
Field Artillery --- The KING of BATTLE!!!

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell
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Joined: June 12th, 2004, 11:07 pm

August 15th, 2004, 8:11 am #9

I recently brought the dragon set 'Winter combat'. I want to incorporate them into a diorama set in snow. Ive never attempted to replicate snow before ive heard tha biocarbonate of soda looks the business, can anyone suggest the best thing to use?

Thanks in advance
I live in a fairly dry climate, so I cannot say how the baking soda will react to high humidity, but I think baking soda is pretty inert stuff. As for fixing it, I simply sprinkle it on, blow it around a little to establish realistic drifts, and then spray it with a flat clear. Repeat as necessary to get the amount of snow you like...
I have inserted an image of an early winter (lets say November) snow scene I did - it is the five year old one I mentioned earlier, and I think the baking soda has held up well. Sorry about the picture quality, but I was too lazy to take a better picture and just used a low-rez one I had sitting around. If you need better pictures, I can get you some...
Happy Modelling.
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Joined: June 12th, 2004, 11:07 pm

August 15th, 2004, 8:16 am #10

I recently brought the dragon set 'Winter combat'. I want to incorporate them into a diorama set in snow. Ive never attempted to replicate snow before ive heard tha biocarbonate of soda looks the business, can anyone suggest the best thing to use?

Thanks in advance
I have no idea why only half the image shows up - sorry. Again, if you need to see more or higher rez, just let me know.
Justin Pockar
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