Dragon Wagon update

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Dragon Wagon update

Joined: October 23rd, 2009, 7:31 pm

October 17th, 2010, 4:03 am #1

Been a while hasent it... Wepp i got the old esci panther A looking a bit more panther like. Still not happy with it though...Not my best effort really. Dragon wagon is basically done. I just need to find a reference for the pneumatic and electrical hookups, i cant find one online. Also i need to see how they would have tied down the panther. The one picture of dry run with it loaded seems to be right after they pulled it on and before they tied it down. The ramps are still down on the trailer and theres no visible evidence of chains or cables holding it.
here is how it sits right now.

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Joined: July 19th, 2005, 4:59 pm

October 17th, 2010, 1:18 pm #2

How did you zimmerit your Panther please?

TIA & All the best
Andy Smith
Worcester, UK
обезьяны собираются к звездам
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Joined: May 15th, 2005, 10:32 pm

October 17th, 2010, 4:55 pm #3

Been a while hasent it... Wepp i got the old esci panther A looking a bit more panther like. Still not happy with it though...Not my best effort really. Dragon wagon is basically done. I just need to find a reference for the pneumatic and electrical hookups, i cant find one online. Also i need to see how they would have tied down the panther. The one picture of dry run with it loaded seems to be right after they pulled it on and before they tied it down. The ramps are still down on the trailer and theres no visible evidence of chains or cables holding it.
here is how it sits right now.

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Wouldn't they have hooked it up to the tow hitches on the front of the panther? That seems to make the most sense.

Your vehicles look simply fantastic! Way to go on such realism.
The Duke; Mark Deliduka
Virtuoso of Miniatures

We are modelers - the same in spirit, in hunger to insanely buy newly released kits, hustlers in hiding our stash from our better halves and experts in using garbage as replacements for after-market parts.
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Joined: October 23rd, 2009, 7:31 pm

October 17th, 2010, 9:13 pm #4

What about securing it for road transport. You wouldnt want something like that free wheeling. Even attached to the winches it would not be fully secured and could further damage the vehicle if left that way while traveling.
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Joined: October 23rd, 2009, 7:31 pm

October 17th, 2010, 9:14 pm #5

How did you zimmerit your Panther please?

TIA & All the best
bondo spot putty, lightly sanded then scribed with some hasegawa photoetch saws.
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Joined: September 17th, 2003, 9:48 pm

October 18th, 2010, 12:26 am #6

What about securing it for road transport. You wouldnt want something like that free wheeling. Even attached to the winches it would not be fully secured and could further damage the vehicle if left that way while traveling.
I have a soft bound book by the name of "Dragon Wagon: A Visual History of the U.S. Army's heavy tank Transporter 1941-1955" by David Doyle & Pat Stansell, published by Ampersand Publishing.

In this book, there are a few photos of loaded armored vehicles. I appears that they were "blocked down" with wood triangular shaped blocks in front of and behind the tracks. This was for front and back movement. For side to side, they also appear to be chained to the sides of the trailer. These went over the side of the trailer, but I may have sent some on the inside of the tracks going in diagonals.

Hope this helps.

Loren Pike
Loren Pike
IPMS#10921
USA
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Joined: October 23rd, 2009, 7:31 pm

October 18th, 2010, 1:49 am #7

I figured on the chains just didnt know about the chocks. Alot of times chocks are pointless on a tracked vehicle since the track makes the chock into just another bump for the suspension to ride over.
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Joined: May 3rd, 2008, 3:56 am

October 18th, 2010, 4:22 am #8

Chocks are mandatory!! When we loaded our armored vehicles on the trains in Germany chocks were nailes both front and back, with chains criss-crossed to hold them down. The same was done when we loaded them on low-boys.
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Joined: October 23rd, 2009, 7:31 pm

October 18th, 2010, 4:36 am #9

However i have seen some photos showing chocks only at times and that seems prtty stupid to me. Also given the weight and nature of the panther i wasnt sure if our guys would have had to use some unusual measures to latch it down. The equipment was more rated for shermans and other vehicles that were not in the same weight class. Also as i stated in the original thread the only photo shws nothing on the trailer holding the panther down. The photo was probably taken just as it was loaded. If this were a sherman i wouldnt have an issue. References abound for that there arent many for panthers on DW trailers.
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Joined: October 15th, 2008, 4:11 am

October 18th, 2010, 9:40 am #10

Been a while hasent it... Wepp i got the old esci panther A looking a bit more panther like. Still not happy with it though...Not my best effort really. Dragon wagon is basically done. I just need to find a reference for the pneumatic and electrical hookups, i cant find one online. Also i need to see how they would have tied down the panther. The one picture of dry run with it loaded seems to be right after they pulled it on and before they tied it down. The ramps are still down on the trailer and theres no visible evidence of chains or cables holding it.
here is how it sits right now.

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Hello

I guess we only have photos as guides as to how a tank on this trailer would be secured, unless someone can come up with a manual for this vehicle which stated how it would be secured, or an account by someone who actually has loaded and driven one can be found.

(Though not specific to this vehicle), the humble wooden chock was in common use to prevent vehicle movement, then and decades later. Dozens of wartime pictures show that wooden chocks were the most common way to secure german armour and vehicles on freight wagons, its much less common to see chains, ropes or cables seen to be in use. Its interesting that only nails were used to prevent a large heavy vehicle from movement, and the forces exerted on loads during train movement could be considerable, due to a 'concertina effect'.

When I was a railway man we would place a humble wooden chock on the rail and kick it in to wedge into the space where the locomotive wheel meets the rail. This was used to secure 100 tonne locomotives. Yes they had a handbrake on as well, but the chock was an extra precaution that was mandatory when stabling a locomotive. Obviously no nails or other means were used to hold the chock as it was wedged between a flat steel rail and a the curve of the steel wheel.

Is it possible that wooden chocks wedged in the right place might also help prevent a load moving on a trailer.

Just my thoughts, for what its worth

(great looking build I'd like to add)

cheers
Neil
Last edited by neilyall on October 18th, 2010, 9:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
Neil Lyall
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