Decals-to cut or not to cut clear film

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Decals-to cut or not to cut clear film

Joined: August 26th, 2005, 6:22 pm

February 12th, 2018, 6:56 pm #1

Hello everybody!
I've just read MIGs new book (How to paint with Acrylics - Ammo Modeling guide)and the Accion Press volume Aircraft - Modelling essentials(yes ,sometimes I'm interested in wingy things too...).
In both books they said about applying decals that you should get rid of the clear film around the printed (Color) decal to avoid silvering. I wondered because IMHO and John Pringent
confirms this in the Osprey Masterclass volume "Armor modeling" that this clear film is often tapered to avoid a sharp edge of the decal to the surrounding color. So he says to keep it and make it invisible with a clear gloss coat.
However I found an older article from an Italian modeler who also cut the decals up to the printed area.
Now I'm confused. Is it really necessary to cut decals out like this?
What do you think and how do you handle decals?
TIA
Markus
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Joined: May 1st, 2005, 8:47 pm

February 12th, 2018, 9:09 pm #2

Me, I tend to apply decals using Kleer (or whatever it's called now). This virtually eliminates silvering and reduces the sometimes obvious cut edge of trimmed decals. Therefore I'm not that bothered whether or not I trim decals, but sometimes, either for reasons of the overall space available for the decal, or because you are applying a sequence of decals close to each other (think unusual registration numbers), you just have to trim them. Have to say that the decals from Microscale, though not always accurate in design or even size, are the thinnest I have ever dealt with and appear to be painted on after application.
Chris
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

February 13th, 2018, 12:13 am #3

Hello everybody!
I've just read MIGs new book (How to paint with Acrylics - Ammo Modeling guide)and the Accion Press volume Aircraft - Modelling essentials(yes ,sometimes I'm interested in wingy things too...).
In both books they said about applying decals that you should get rid of the clear film around the printed (Color) decal to avoid silvering. I wondered because IMHO and John Pringent
confirms this in the Osprey Masterclass volume "Armor modeling" that this clear film is often tapered to avoid a sharp edge of the decal to the surrounding color. So he says to keep it and make it invisible with a clear gloss coat.
However I found an older article from an Italian modeler who also cut the decals up to the printed area.
Now I'm confused. Is it really necessary to cut decals out like this?
What do you think and how do you handle decals?
TIA
Markus
From my own experiences I have never seen tapered decal film. Not saying it doesn't exist, but that is another issue anyway. Tapered film has nothing to do with silvering. Trimming decals up to the image goes back 50 years for a neat finish.

Silvering is air trapped between the decal film and the paint. Flat paint is rough and you have a greater chance of the clear film trapping air underneath it. So, you would want to gloss the model to alleviate silvering. But, even with a gloss finish and decal set, you may get silvering. Or you can still see the decal film itself even if there is no silvering.

If you cut out, say, German crosses or US stars right up at the image, there is zero risk of any clear carrier film showing. You could even apply the decal over flat paint. Things like code letters look better with the film removed becuase the film often extends out past the numbers far enough that each decal overlaps. But, if you cut them as close as possible, you can get a better fit without overlapping them.

If you are worried about a raised edge around the image, that can be alleviated with some clear gloss layers and then a clear flat layer on top.

DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 4:59 am

February 13th, 2018, 1:23 pm #4

Hello everybody!
I've just read MIGs new book (How to paint with Acrylics - Ammo Modeling guide)and the Accion Press volume Aircraft - Modelling essentials(yes ,sometimes I'm interested in wingy things too...).
In both books they said about applying decals that you should get rid of the clear film around the printed (Color) decal to avoid silvering. I wondered because IMHO and John Pringent
confirms this in the Osprey Masterclass volume "Armor modeling" that this clear film is often tapered to avoid a sharp edge of the decal to the surrounding color. So he says to keep it and make it invisible with a clear gloss coat.
However I found an older article from an Italian modeler who also cut the decals up to the printed area.
Now I'm confused. Is it really necessary to cut decals out like this?
What do you think and how do you handle decals?
TIA
Markus
tight as possible using small scissors or a new blade in the knife. Use a decal setting solution when applying. If there is this edge, it will settle it down. After drying, I always give it a coat of dull coat to protect it from weathering.
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Joined: August 26th, 2005, 6:22 pm

February 13th, 2018, 9:11 pm #5

Hello everybody!
I've just read MIGs new book (How to paint with Acrylics - Ammo Modeling guide)and the Accion Press volume Aircraft - Modelling essentials(yes ,sometimes I'm interested in wingy things too...).
In both books they said about applying decals that you should get rid of the clear film around the printed (Color) decal to avoid silvering. I wondered because IMHO and John Pringent
confirms this in the Osprey Masterclass volume "Armor modeling" that this clear film is often tapered to avoid a sharp edge of the decal to the surrounding color. So he says to keep it and make it invisible with a clear gloss coat.
However I found an older article from an Italian modeler who also cut the decals up to the printed area.
Now I'm confused. Is it really necessary to cut decals out like this?
What do you think and how do you handle decals?
TIA
Markus
Thank you guys for answering my question. Now I know that ist not another "spanish" fashion in modeling but has its reasons (as I thought).
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