CMP C8A HUW

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CMP C8A HUW

Joined: March 24th, 2011, 8:17 pm

July 25th, 2012, 9:11 am #1

Hello
Surely the most impressive example of the military's predilection for TLAs (that's Three Letter Acronyms), the Canadian built CMP Heavy Utility truck.

I first became aware of the type through the late lamented editor of 'Wheels and Tracks' magazine, Bart Vanderveen. Though his interest and knowledge of military vehicles stretched broadly across most types, his favourite was always the CMP HU. And you can see why. This boxy purposeful 8-cwt vehicle really looks the part, like a 1940s Hummer. It was used for all manner of purposes from troop carrier to workshop. It became ubiquitous, serving wherever Commonwealth troops were and could be described as emblematic of the

Bart's enthusiasm for the beast was infectious. After his death in 2003 I began work on creating a model of the type with the intention of representing each of the major types. With the help of the folk at Milicast, we now have five versions:- HUP (Personnel) early; HUP late (with spare tyre in a recessed panel on the side); HUA (Ambulance); HUZL (Workshop); and HUW (Wireless).

It is the last of those listed which is my favourite, the HUW. Those of you who have read the article on the Bedford QLR may have noticed a common theme. Though I never had a connection with the Royal Signals, the business of their existence has always fascinated. In my frequent trawls through the British National Archive at Kew, one of the key points of reference is the signal traffic recorded, usually at Division or Corps level. Where unit War Diaries are often vague about timings, the wireless logs were kept immaculately, recording exactly when an order was given or when an objective was reported taken. So, in a continuing 'homage' to the work of the Signalmen, here is my rendition of the CMP HUW.



The wireless operator was adapted from the figure from my MT Drivers. It is a wonder I have any left to sell. I also added wires, a microphone, a mug of tea, a battledress blouse sculpted from epoxy putty hung up on the wall, and some oddments of paperwork.



Having put so much effort into the interior, it s proving impossible to put the roof on. One day...

Hope that was interesting.

You can look at this and other vehicles here:
http://www.dantaylormodelworks.com/brit ... s-21-c.asp

All the best
Dan

www.dantaylormodelworks.com
Last edited by Dan-Taylor on July 25th, 2012, 11:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
Dan Taylor Modelworks

"My life is like my room - I'm sure it was tidy two days ago" Alphonse Tram in the film 'Buffet Froid' 1979
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Joined: April 15th, 2010, 12:16 am

July 25th, 2012, 11:43 am #2

Another superb effort, Dan. Your attention to detail is outstanding. Please keep them coming.

Cheers,

Neil
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Joined: May 9th, 2010, 12:48 pm

July 25th, 2012, 1:01 pm #3

Hello
Surely the most impressive example of the military's predilection for TLAs (that's Three Letter Acronyms), the Canadian built CMP Heavy Utility truck.

I first became aware of the type through the late lamented editor of 'Wheels and Tracks' magazine, Bart Vanderveen. Though his interest and knowledge of military vehicles stretched broadly across most types, his favourite was always the CMP HU. And you can see why. This boxy purposeful 8-cwt vehicle really looks the part, like a 1940s Hummer. It was used for all manner of purposes from troop carrier to workshop. It became ubiquitous, serving wherever Commonwealth troops were and could be described as emblematic of the

Bart's enthusiasm for the beast was infectious. After his death in 2003 I began work on creating a model of the type with the intention of representing each of the major types. With the help of the folk at Milicast, we now have five versions:- HUP (Personnel) early; HUP late (with spare tyre in a recessed panel on the side); HUA (Ambulance); HUZL (Workshop); and HUW (Wireless).

It is the last of those listed which is my favourite, the HUW. Those of you who have read the article on the Bedford QLR may have noticed a common theme. Though I never had a connection with the Royal Signals, the business of their existence has always fascinated. In my frequent trawls through the British National Archive at Kew, one of the key points of reference is the signal traffic recorded, usually at Division or Corps level. Where unit War Diaries are often vague about timings, the wireless logs were kept immaculately, recording exactly when an order was given or when an objective was reported taken. So, in a continuing 'homage' to the work of the Signalmen, here is my rendition of the CMP HUW.



The wireless operator was adapted from the figure from my MT Drivers. It is a wonder I have any left to sell. I also added wires, a microphone, a mug of tea, a battledress blouse sculpted from epoxy putty hung up on the wall, and some oddments of paperwork.



Having put so much effort into the interior, it s proving impossible to put the roof on. One day...

Hope that was interesting.

You can look at this and other vehicles here:
http://www.dantaylormodelworks.com/brit ... s-21-c.asp

All the best
Dan

www.dantaylormodelworks.com
Especially all the small details, gives it a lot of life.
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Joined: April 5th, 2004, 3:57 am

July 25th, 2012, 7:24 pm #4

Hello
Surely the most impressive example of the military's predilection for TLAs (that's Three Letter Acronyms), the Canadian built CMP Heavy Utility truck.

I first became aware of the type through the late lamented editor of 'Wheels and Tracks' magazine, Bart Vanderveen. Though his interest and knowledge of military vehicles stretched broadly across most types, his favourite was always the CMP HU. And you can see why. This boxy purposeful 8-cwt vehicle really looks the part, like a 1940s Hummer. It was used for all manner of purposes from troop carrier to workshop. It became ubiquitous, serving wherever Commonwealth troops were and could be described as emblematic of the

Bart's enthusiasm for the beast was infectious. After his death in 2003 I began work on creating a model of the type with the intention of representing each of the major types. With the help of the folk at Milicast, we now have five versions:- HUP (Personnel) early; HUP late (with spare tyre in a recessed panel on the side); HUA (Ambulance); HUZL (Workshop); and HUW (Wireless).

It is the last of those listed which is my favourite, the HUW. Those of you who have read the article on the Bedford QLR may have noticed a common theme. Though I never had a connection with the Royal Signals, the business of their existence has always fascinated. In my frequent trawls through the British National Archive at Kew, one of the key points of reference is the signal traffic recorded, usually at Division or Corps level. Where unit War Diaries are often vague about timings, the wireless logs were kept immaculately, recording exactly when an order was given or when an objective was reported taken. So, in a continuing 'homage' to the work of the Signalmen, here is my rendition of the CMP HUW.



The wireless operator was adapted from the figure from my MT Drivers. It is a wonder I have any left to sell. I also added wires, a microphone, a mug of tea, a battledress blouse sculpted from epoxy putty hung up on the wall, and some oddments of paperwork.



Having put so much effort into the interior, it s proving impossible to put the roof on. One day...

Hope that was interesting.

You can look at this and other vehicles here:
http://www.dantaylormodelworks.com/brit ... s-21-c.asp

All the best
Dan

www.dantaylormodelworks.com
Which unit will it be? I wouldn't want to put the roof on either
beautiful work you have put into that.

The HUA would be my pick, I want to do a 3rd ID one off Sword
with infantry walking bikes, a jeep with snorkel & Bren with waders

Though of doing another book? love to see a British army support vehicles of WWII
from someone like Concord with artwork by Dennis Oliver?

Cheers Elliott
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Joined: March 24th, 2011, 8:17 pm

July 25th, 2012, 9:43 pm #5

Especially all the small details, gives it a lot of life.
Hi
Good to hear that the effort is appreciated.

Thanks
Dan
Dan Taylor Modelworks

"My life is like my room - I'm sure it was tidy two days ago" Alphonse Tram in the film 'Buffet Froid' 1979
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Joined: March 24th, 2011, 8:17 pm

July 25th, 2012, 9:54 pm #6

Which unit will it be? I wouldn't want to put the roof on either
beautiful work you have put into that.

The HUA would be my pick, I want to do a 3rd ID one off Sword
with infantry walking bikes, a jeep with snorkel & Bren with waders

Though of doing another book? love to see a British army support vehicles of WWII
from someone like Concord with artwork by Dennis Oliver?

Cheers Elliott
Hello Elliott
It sounds like we may be working with similar reference books. Recognize these?




Let me know what you are intending. Half my current production centres on items based on Jimmy Mapham's photographs.

I've been working on three books which seems an effective way of not finishing any of them. One on Op Crusader (Western Desert 1941), one on Landing Craft in British Service, and one that's a follow up on the Villers-Bocage book. There seems a missmatch between the number of hours available and the number required to finish anything.

All the best

Dan
Dan Taylor Modelworks

"My life is like my room - I'm sure it was tidy two days ago" Alphonse Tram in the film 'Buffet Froid' 1979
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Joined: August 8th, 2007, 1:51 am

July 25th, 2012, 10:31 pm #7

Hi Dan,

I've been following your recent posts and admiring your work - but this diorama is just stunning! I'd love to see some more pictures if you have them.

I'm also very interested in the Mapham photographs. I've often thought there's scope for a book showing the whole series, together with colour plates, background notes etc.

Still hoping you'll come out with an LCS (M) one day

All the best,
Andrew
Gluing things together since 1970.
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Joined: April 5th, 2004, 3:57 am

July 25th, 2012, 10:46 pm #8

Hello Elliott
It sounds like we may be working with similar reference books. Recognize these?




Let me know what you are intending. Half my current production centres on items based on Jimmy Mapham's photographs.

I've been working on three books which seems an effective way of not finishing any of them. One on Op Crusader (Western Desert 1941), one on Landing Craft in British Service, and one that's a follow up on the Villers-Bocage book. There seems a missmatch between the number of hours available and the number required to finish anything.

All the best

Dan
Those are awesome,
I thought it was a colourised version of the well known photo's at first.
The photo's I have are in the first 'After the Battle' mag Normandy 73.
Is there any other publications that have more James Mapham's photos per chance?

All your books sound like interesting,
loved your ATB VB book, I think you had even signed mine

What style books would each be? ATB or Osprey for Op Crusder?,
LC a "in Action" with Squadron type?

Cheers Elliott






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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 1:50 pm

July 26th, 2012, 11:53 am #9

Hello
Surely the most impressive example of the military's predilection for TLAs (that's Three Letter Acronyms), the Canadian built CMP Heavy Utility truck.

I first became aware of the type through the late lamented editor of 'Wheels and Tracks' magazine, Bart Vanderveen. Though his interest and knowledge of military vehicles stretched broadly across most types, his favourite was always the CMP HU. And you can see why. This boxy purposeful 8-cwt vehicle really looks the part, like a 1940s Hummer. It was used for all manner of purposes from troop carrier to workshop. It became ubiquitous, serving wherever Commonwealth troops were and could be described as emblematic of the

Bart's enthusiasm for the beast was infectious. After his death in 2003 I began work on creating a model of the type with the intention of representing each of the major types. With the help of the folk at Milicast, we now have five versions:- HUP (Personnel) early; HUP late (with spare tyre in a recessed panel on the side); HUA (Ambulance); HUZL (Workshop); and HUW (Wireless).

It is the last of those listed which is my favourite, the HUW. Those of you who have read the article on the Bedford QLR may have noticed a common theme. Though I never had a connection with the Royal Signals, the business of their existence has always fascinated. In my frequent trawls through the British National Archive at Kew, one of the key points of reference is the signal traffic recorded, usually at Division or Corps level. Where unit War Diaries are often vague about timings, the wireless logs were kept immaculately, recording exactly when an order was given or when an objective was reported taken. So, in a continuing 'homage' to the work of the Signalmen, here is my rendition of the CMP HUW.



The wireless operator was adapted from the figure from my MT Drivers. It is a wonder I have any left to sell. I also added wires, a microphone, a mug of tea, a battledress blouse sculpted from epoxy putty hung up on the wall, and some oddments of paperwork.



Having put so much effort into the interior, it s proving impossible to put the roof on. One day...

Hope that was interesting.

You can look at this and other vehicles here:
http://www.dantaylormodelworks.com/brit ... s-21-c.asp

All the best
Dan

www.dantaylormodelworks.com
I've got one of those in my stash Dan. Now I have the inspiration I need!

Cheers

David
David Clark
Bellarine Peninsula, Victoria, Australia

Nostalgia isn't what it used to be - Simone Signoret
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Joined: March 24th, 2011, 8:17 pm

July 26th, 2012, 12:27 pm #10

Hi Dan,

I've been following your recent posts and admiring your work - but this diorama is just stunning! I'd love to see some more pictures if you have them.

I'm also very interested in the Mapham photographs. I've often thought there's scope for a book showing the whole series, together with colour plates, background notes etc.

Still hoping you'll come out with an LCS (M) one day

All the best,
Andrew
Hello Andrew
Thanks for the comments. As you suggest, Mapham's pictures give an excellent narrative of D-Day. They are perfect for model makers because he tends to take a bunch of pictures in a single spot before moving on to the next.

Here are some more pictures as requested:





It needs a lot more dirtying up and I'm working my way through the figures in the photographs, adding them to my range as I go. If you look at the illustrations for the figure sets on my website you can probaly work out where they are meant to be placed. The buildings are (with minor alteration) still there and so I was able to fully survey the site and create plans of each of them. I have somewhat over produced the vehicles so that all of the ones depicted in the photographs are available in order that I can choose the precise moment at a later stage.

Though there is still some work to do, you can get a pretty good idea of the scope of the model from this aerial view:



A couple more test layouts:





This is the third of three dioramas depicting 'Jimmy Mapham's D-Day'. The first is based on the pictures taken in Shoreham on either 4th or 5th June; the second shows the scene on the beach at about 10am on 6th June, approximately when he landed; and the third scene shows the junction at Hermanville-la-Breche, the first lateral road off the beach an hour or so later.

Though the Hermanville diorama is the furthest developed, the first is coming along fairly well too. It depicts two landing craft of 41 LCT Flotilla as they are being are loaded with 13/18 Hussars and various units of 3 Inf Div. When I built the LCT4 for Accurate Armour about ten years ago this scene was the intended conclusion:




This is just a basic layout and requires a lot of work to finish the sea, the hard and the myriad figures. There's going to be a jetty running out between the two craft and a number more vehicles in LCT 789. You can probably tell, it is a labour of love.

The plan is to have the three dioramas completed next year so that they can be displayed for the 70th Anniversary of D-Day.

The LCS (M) is still on the cards and I have the basic hull built. My problem is that there are not enough of me to go round all of the projects I have on the go and I can't afford an assistant as yet. If you happen to know of any funding angels, their telephone numbers would be appreciated!

Hope that was interesting

Regards
Dan

www.dantaylormodelworks.com
Dan Taylor Modelworks

"My life is like my room - I'm sure it was tidy two days ago" Alphonse Tram in the film 'Buffet Froid' 1979
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