Battle of the Hedgerows - Caen 1944

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Battle of the Hedgerows - Caen 1944

Joined: September 11th, 2003, 10:08 am

October 10th, 2003, 6:57 am #1

Please view 1:35 scale diorama depicting mopping up operations around Caen after D-Day.

Here are some photos









All vehicles and figures are Tamiya products that have been painted with Humberol enamels and weathered with oil washes and enamel dry brushing / soiling.

Here is the link to view the rest of the photos
http://community.webshots.com/album/62569092NAZboZ

Please send comments or suggestions for future improvements.
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Niels Henkemans
Niels Henkemans

October 10th, 2003, 11:16 am #2

or at least it's very unlikely. Why? There were no American troops in that sector. It was the britsh(& canadian) sector. The americans controlled the western sector (to the west of Bayeux)and the british the eastern sector. You might be able to make it more accurate if you change the vehicle into a French M8. The french used a lot of american equipment and were as far as i know fighting with the British. Something else: The discription on your site is "WWII USA M8 Greyhound advances into Southern France" I'd remove "southern France" because if you look at the map of France they stay in the Northern half. BTW the allies in Normandy did move mainly to the west and north (Germany) while other american troops moved to the west to capture or seige importent harbours. There were american troops in southern France but they came there during or folowing the amphidious operation there, but I can't remember the name rightnow (Dragoon landings?).

But let's go back to you're dio. My advise would be: change the location. Make it the American sector around St-Lô for example or the peninsula. I don't really understand you dio (a birdview of the enitre dio will probably help). I guess the american are driving pover a small bocage road, but it's blocked by a german position. Am I right? If I am, i must say I'm not sure how common position like these were. Most PAK's (german and allied) I've seen were simply hidden between the bushes or against a hedgerow at the sides of a road. That way it's more difficult to detect them. Blocking a road can't really be overlooked by passing scouts or airplanes. Than again I can't prove positions like this did not exist I would recommend to say the scene took place right after D-Day as you did) because I can understand building (positions like this before D-Day (time to do it and build a roof). Don't think I'd do that if I'm pushed around.
Just my to cents and if someone doesn't agree I'd love to hear it.

Let's quit the history lesson now
I like the look of your vehicles and always like amushes Too bad I can't see a good "overall view"
BTW what did you use for your hedges? never seen that before.

Grtz Niels

PS this might be an interesting link:
http://search.eb.com/normandy/week1/buildup.html
PPS I'm working on a bocage Dio too: http://groups.msn.com/Dutchmodelbuildin ... snw?Page=6
PPPS Why don't you post you're dio at the underconstruction forum? More people visit that so you'll get more tips and information.
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Joined: September 11th, 2003, 10:08 am

October 13th, 2003, 6:54 am #3

Hi Niels

Thanks for your historically accurate comments, I think in future I will do a bit more research before submitting comments. I have made the adjustments to my webpage and will send out an updated version on Missing Lynx.

I will take some more photos to give an overall view.

The hedges are made by using dried out roots of small shrubs / weeds. These are then trimmed to size and dipped in a mixture of white (wood) glue and water in the ratio of 1:3 (glue:water). Dried peat moss is also coarsely chopped up and added into the mix. Remove the "tree" from the glue mix and add more moss and various particle size of dry coloured saw dust to look like foilage.

Once dry touch up by air/dry-brushing with various shades of brown and green to get the desired look

Regards
Michael Campbell
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Shane Kunze
Shane Kunze

October 17th, 2003, 2:17 pm #4

Please view 1:35 scale diorama depicting mopping up operations around Caen after D-Day.

Here are some photos









All vehicles and figures are Tamiya products that have been painted with Humberol enamels and weathered with oil washes and enamel dry brushing / soiling.

Here is the link to view the rest of the photos
http://community.webshots.com/album/62569092NAZboZ

Please send comments or suggestions for future improvements.
hey great job, as for not being in Caen, hey i dont know??? but at the end of the day who cares as long as YOU are happy with it right?, if i may be so bold to suggest one thing.... try vallejo paint on the figures, i use a base coat of salmon rose and then flesh colours gives great results and is much better than tamiya flesh
regs
Shane
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Joined: September 11th, 2003, 10:08 am

October 20th, 2003, 10:19 am #5

Hi Niels

Thanks for your historically accurate comments, I think in future I will do a bit more research before submitting comments. I have made the adjustments to my webpage and will send out an updated version on Missing Lynx.

I will take some more photos to give an overall view.

The hedges are made by using dried out roots of small shrubs / weeds. These are then trimmed to size and dipped in a mixture of white (wood) glue and water in the ratio of 1:3 (glue:water). Dried peat moss is also coarsely chopped up and added into the mix. Remove the "tree" from the glue mix and add more moss and various particle size of dry coloured saw dust to look like foilage.

Once dry touch up by air/dry-brushing with various shades of brown and green to get the desired look

Regards
Michael Campbell
Please view aerial vies and some new ones.










Regards
Mike Campbell
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Joined: September 11th, 2003, 10:08 am

October 23rd, 2003, 1:10 pm #6

Apologies it seems there are a problem (on my pc anyway)











Thank you
Michael Campbell
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