Allied Zimmerit??

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Allied Zimmerit??

Joined: February 7th, 2010, 5:58 pm

June 10th, 2012, 2:45 am #1

Hey guys, Allied vehicles are not my speciality, but seeing this video on 11:00 appears a British tank with a coating on its turret much similar to the anti magnetic German paste.

Could someone tell me about this??


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rErmsHMe ... re=related


Thanks in advance.

Regards,

Juan Manuel
from Banfield city...

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Joined: April 6th, 2005, 8:48 am

June 10th, 2012, 3:25 am #2

wonder why they did it ? Certainly not recaptured back from the germans.
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Joined: February 7th, 2010, 5:58 pm

June 10th, 2012, 3:44 am #3

Hi Barry! Once I read that British intelligence was very busy trying to know what exactly Zimmerit was made off and what kind of improvement gave on German tanks. But what I really didn´t know was that they put something similiar on their AFV´s. It´s something new for me, but remember knowledge about Allied vehicles are not my strong point.
If I´m no wrong I think that I have a Cromwell tank in 1/35....may be it would be an interesting topic to reproduce....

Thanks for you response.

Regards,

Juan Manuel
form Banfield city...
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Joined: February 7th, 2010, 5:58 pm

June 10th, 2012, 4:04 am #4

wonder why they did it ? Certainly not recaptured back from the germans.
I found this document in the web:

from PORTRAYAL PRESS, page 48.
by Jeffrey D. McKaughan
British "Zimmerit"
It is widely known ofthe Gennan practice ofapplying a paste-like substance to the lower surfaces of annor veWcles during the mid-stages ofWWII. TWs in response to the use ofmagnetic mines by infantIy and partisans who would wait in Wding to attach one of the mines to the lower sides of a tank.. Called zimmerit, this paste was applied roughly to the lower surfaces. Different patternswere thenapplied so thatthere were no smooth surfaces for a mine to grip.
However, according to a report, anti-magnetic plastic was tested by the British in the European Theater on vehicles at the 256 Armoured Delivery Squadronon 14 April 1945. The report does not clearly indicate iftWs was the first time the experiments were conducted by this unit or others like it.
The material used was described as a "plastic" that is kept loose with an industrial alcohol. It was noted that because of damage to the containers that held the plastic, considerable evaporation had taken place. To make the plastic workable again, varying amounts of alcohol were added by the maintenance staff of the 256th.
The material was to be sprayed on but it was found locally that application by trowel was also effective, ifnot more so. It was noted that the fumes from the plastic were difficult to work around even if the vehicle was out in the open.
The plastic was applied to four veWcles for evaluation purposes. These included a Cromwell, Churchill, Ram Sexton. and the gun shield ofa 25-pdr.
The Cromwell was the first vehicle tried and it took 80 man hours and two days to apply the plastic. Because it was the first, subsequent veWcles took proportionally less time and material.
Several mixtures were tried, including mixing wood wool with the top coat. The result was a finish that was far too smooth even afterstipplingwith fingers. It was also determined that if too much alcohol was used in with the plastic it resulted in a very glossy surface and had a tendency to crack. By far the best mixture was with chopped straw added to the plastic.
The 256th tried to duplicate a ridged-pattern to the plastic, similar to a pattern used by the Gennans. Using a wooden roller to create the ridges, it proved exceedingly difficult as the consistency ofthe plastic seemed too critical for proper application. The results did not warrant the effort.
There was no follow on report attached and no indication of a final conclusion by the 256th. however, one can assume that by this late stage of the war that the threatwas not deemed very high and not requiring further action.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 9:18 pm

June 10th, 2012, 7:51 am #5

Hey guys, Allied vehicles are not my speciality, but seeing this video on 11:00 appears a British tank with a coating on its turret much similar to the anti magnetic German paste.

Could someone tell me about this??


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rErmsHMe ... re=related


Thanks in advance.

Regards,

Juan Manuel
from Banfield city...
and not sprayed on.
This was an attempt using rubber strips as a countermeasure against hollow charges.
I don't recall the unit (11th AD?), but there was an article in Military Modelling a few years back. Bison Decals has a set of markings for Centaur and Cromwell in 1/35, including the 'zimmed' Cromwells. And there's coverage in the book published by Oliver Publishing Group.
http://www.oliverpublishinggroup.com/cr ... e_page.htm

Hope this helps,

MartinD
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 6:44 am

June 10th, 2012, 11:42 am #6

That doesn't look like rubber strips to me - looks as if it has been applied directly to the turret shell

Isn't there a picture in one of the Warpaint books of a British Sherman half covered in British Zimmerit

sk
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Joined: March 12th, 2004, 7:09 pm

June 10th, 2012, 1:09 pm #7




IWM B9098

August 1944





C squadron 2nd Northants Yeomanry, 11th Armoured Division
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

June 10th, 2012, 4:01 pm #8

That doesn't look like rubber strips to me - looks as if it has been applied directly to the turret shell

Isn't there a picture in one of the Warpaint books of a British Sherman half covered in British Zimmerit

sk
You can even buy a resin hull for it - was an experiement/test

http://www.hlj.com/product/NEG35033

DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 6:44 am

June 10th, 2012, 7:07 pm #9




IWM B9098

August 1944





C squadron 2nd Northants Yeomanry, 11th Armoured Division
So is the Cromwell from the screen grab/youtube clip covered in the same product as in the bottom picture which is how I always thought tanks covered in this material looked - hence my comment. If that's the case, was the first tank covered in complete sheets of the stuff - and perhaps the bottom tank was just covered in off-cuts - certainly the application is very different

sk
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Joined: June 25th, 2005, 2:52 am

June 10th, 2012, 11:07 pm #10

You can even buy a resin hull for it - was an experiement/test

http://www.hlj.com/product/NEG35033
There is a report of Anti-Magnetic Compound No. 2 being tested by 1st Canadian Army as a form of camouflage in "21 Army Group AFV Technical Report # 26, Amended". Some of the test patterns resemble zimmerit:









Sam Wren
Abilene, TX

"My cat may be able to telepathically control my mind, but he will never be able to play the piano." - unknown
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