AFV Club LVT4, so far, so good.

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AFV Club LVT4, so far, so good.

Joined: October 8th, 2000, 5:30 pm

May 10th, 2012, 11:46 am #1

I have a vested interest in the AFV Club kits of the LVT4. Years ago I made the master for Cromwell Models LVT4 kit, then when the Italeri kit came out I wrote an article for Mil Mod about it, plus made the Cromwell Models Polsten master at the same time (and I have three in abox somewhere). Italeri's kit was a surprise at the time and wasn't too bad, just a little clunky and poorly researched.

So when AFV club announced their kits I was quite pleased as everything they have produced so far has been exquisite in detail. My stash has two early kits and one late. I have the late one partially built, the suspension is on and the cab is assembled and painted. Here's what I think so far:

The standard of moulding and detailing is excellent. The suspension sort of works and actually went together very easily with one exception. Each bogie has a mud scraper as an add on part and boy, is it ever difficult to fit. Lots of cursing and swearing on the first half dozen, then I sort of fell into the groove for the rest. Italeri didn't even bother, just gave you the arms at each side of the scraper but no central bar. The idler assembly is very realistic. While I was in the area I made up the wash vanes: Italeri moulded thick blocks which needed a huge amount of work to look decent, AFV's take is lots of skinny bits of plastic which seems quite daunting even for an old modeller like me. BUT I knocked both sets together is a couple of minutes, dead easy!

The cab area is a beauty. The gearbox and final drives are superb but you will see very little of it when the roof is on. A shame as all the levers and pedals and linkages are there, admittedly a pain to assemble as the bits are really close together. I was going to add all the oil hoses to the gearbox but soon realized there was no way I could fiddle them in with my sausage fingers and failing eyesight! As I said above, you wouldn't see them through the hatches anyway.

So far the painting has just been the cab and walkway areas, which are still sub assemblies. The cab floor is airbrushed in Life Color OD shades, all the rest in Vallejo White, with a spray of AK Satin Varnish. Then AK 045 Dark Brown Wash for the floor and MIG Neutral Wash for the white bits. Taking away the washes with White Spirit (stumping or feathering) soon popped out the detail that AFV Club has faithfully moulded. A little bit of chipping and rusting as this was an amphibious vehicle and in salt water a lot. Most of this is where the crew would place their feet when getting in and out of the top hatches, so gearbox and prop shaft cover mainly.

This one will end up in US markings but one of the early models will get the full British 79th Armoured Div treatment, Polsten on the roof, Kapok floats (they look like matresses in photos), etc.

As the message title says, so far, so good.

Bruce Crosby
Last edited by Bruce_Crosby on May 10th, 2012, 11:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 31st, 2003, 10:50 am

May 10th, 2012, 5:44 pm #2

Hi Bruce,
as I am a "Buffaloe-Buff", I have your MilMod-article and am very pleased to read your short impressions on the new AFV-kit of the LVT: Thank you! Now I am looking foreward to seeing them finished - especially the British-one!
Richard
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Joined: October 8th, 2000, 5:30 pm

May 10th, 2012, 6:30 pm #3

Because today the LZ resin replacement radiators for Trumpeter's Stalinets turned up! Lovely stuff, 2 radiators, 2 engines and 2 kits.

Seriously, I love the LVTs and if you take an intelligent look at the sprues you can make some interesting conclusions.

1. Lots of late pattern vision ports on the clear sprue, more than needed for the LVT 4, but easily enough for a late pattern LVT(A)5. Correct sponsons for a late version.

2. LVT (A)4 and early LVT(A)5 after the (A)5 as the right parts are already on the suspension sprue. A new hull and sponsons then leads to:

3. LVT(A)1, 2 and(A)2 as the right hull will come with 2 above.

Of course, this could just be a pipe dream, but all the signs are there on the sprues.

Bruce Crosby
Last edited by Bruce_Crosby on May 10th, 2012, 6:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 22nd, 2005, 9:18 pm

May 10th, 2012, 9:17 pm #4

Shame that AFV did the engine bay empty though... how do we disguise that hole?!

Wouldn't mind a Polsten on it.. I heard rumour they might bring out a Buff with that on it. Any spare ones around ?

Cheers
Andrew
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Joined: July 27th, 2011, 3:57 pm

May 13th, 2012, 9:27 am #5

I have a vested interest in the AFV Club kits of the LVT4. Years ago I made the master for Cromwell Models LVT4 kit, then when the Italeri kit came out I wrote an article for Mil Mod about it, plus made the Cromwell Models Polsten master at the same time (and I have three in abox somewhere). Italeri's kit was a surprise at the time and wasn't too bad, just a little clunky and poorly researched.

So when AFV club announced their kits I was quite pleased as everything they have produced so far has been exquisite in detail. My stash has two early kits and one late. I have the late one partially built, the suspension is on and the cab is assembled and painted. Here's what I think so far:

The standard of moulding and detailing is excellent. The suspension sort of works and actually went together very easily with one exception. Each bogie has a mud scraper as an add on part and boy, is it ever difficult to fit. Lots of cursing and swearing on the first half dozen, then I sort of fell into the groove for the rest. Italeri didn't even bother, just gave you the arms at each side of the scraper but no central bar. The idler assembly is very realistic. While I was in the area I made up the wash vanes: Italeri moulded thick blocks which needed a huge amount of work to look decent, AFV's take is lots of skinny bits of plastic which seems quite daunting even for an old modeller like me. BUT I knocked both sets together is a couple of minutes, dead easy!

The cab area is a beauty. The gearbox and final drives are superb but you will see very little of it when the roof is on. A shame as all the levers and pedals and linkages are there, admittedly a pain to assemble as the bits are really close together. I was going to add all the oil hoses to the gearbox but soon realized there was no way I could fiddle them in with my sausage fingers and failing eyesight! As I said above, you wouldn't see them through the hatches anyway.

So far the painting has just been the cab and walkway areas, which are still sub assemblies. The cab floor is airbrushed in Life Color OD shades, all the rest in Vallejo White, with a spray of AK Satin Varnish. Then AK 045 Dark Brown Wash for the floor and MIG Neutral Wash for the white bits. Taking away the washes with White Spirit (stumping or feathering) soon popped out the detail that AFV Club has faithfully moulded. A little bit of chipping and rusting as this was an amphibious vehicle and in salt water a lot. Most of this is where the crew would place their feet when getting in and out of the top hatches, so gearbox and prop shaft cover mainly.

This one will end up in US markings but one of the early models will get the full British 79th Armoured Div treatment, Polsten on the roof, Kapok floats (they look like matresses in photos), etc.

As the message title says, so far, so good.

Bruce Crosby
hope AFV Club do a British Buffalo with Polsten n/t
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Joined: October 8th, 2000, 5:30 pm

May 13th, 2012, 2:21 pm #6

Shame that AFV did the engine bay empty though... how do we disguise that hole?!

Wouldn't mind a Polsten on it.. I heard rumour they might bring out a Buff with that on it. Any spare ones around ?

Cheers
Andrew
The whole engine bay is boxed in, so there isn't an empty void to look at. I would wait for someone to do a reasonable drop-in section that has the inner walkway surfaces with the oil coolers detailed inside and out, and a new bulkhead and a decent engine.

If I remember correctly the old Verlinden set for the Italeri kit was pants, with a 9 cylinder engine when it should have been a 7 cylinder as fitted to the M3 Stuart series.

Wait for something good to arrive.

Bruce
Last edited by Bruce_Crosby on May 13th, 2012, 2:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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