After war license plates?

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The Axis WWII discussion group is hosted by Tom Cockle and is dedicated to Axis armour of the Second World War.

After war license plates?

Joined: June 4th, 2011, 7:09 pm

May 15th, 2012, 4:16 pm #1

How the WH and LF vehicles were marked in 1946-1947? Were the old number plates left or new ones were issued?

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/
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Joined: February 20th, 2008, 6:54 am

May 15th, 2012, 4:59 pm #2

Simple as it is after the war - there was no german military until mid 50ties - so no plates as well
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Joined: June 4th, 2011, 7:09 pm

May 15th, 2012, 5:29 pm #3

but what kind of markings the vehicles had? Allied?

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/
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Joined: July 4th, 2003, 2:33 pm

May 15th, 2012, 11:41 pm #4

How the WH and LF vehicles were marked in 1946-1947? Were the old number plates left or new ones were issued?

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/
If they use by civilians they have the normal german licens plates otherwise if they use by allied forces allied license plates but some without any plate .Germany got no military force until Bundeswehr was formed in 1955

greetings Detlev

http://panzer-modell.de.tl/
Last edited by Detlev Kaczmarek on May 15th, 2012, 11:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 4th, 2011, 7:09 pm

May 15th, 2012, 11:51 pm #5

what about coal transporters or wood carriers - was that civilian or ?

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/
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Joined: July 4th, 2003, 2:33 pm

May 16th, 2012, 2:53 am #6

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Joined: June 11th, 2006, 8:26 am

May 16th, 2012, 11:17 am #7

How the WH and LF vehicles were marked in 1946-1947? Were the old number plates left or new ones were issued?

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/
from WIKIpedia

After World War II the responsibility for the security of Germany as a whole rested with the four Allied Powers: the United States, the United Kingdom, France and the Soviet Union. Germany had been without armed forces since the Wehrmacht was dissolved following World War II. When the Federal Republic of Germany was founded in 1949, it was without a military. Germany remained completely demilitarized and any plans for a German military were forbidden by Allied regulations. Only some naval mine-sweeping units had continued to exist, but unarmed, under Allied control, and not as a national defence force. Even the Border guards was only established in 1951. A proposal to integrate West German troops with soldiers of France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and Italy in a European Defence Community was proposed but never implemented.

There was a discussion between the United States, the United Kingdom and France over the issue of a revived (West) German military. In particular, France was reluctant to allow Germany to rearm in light of recent history (Germany had invaded France twice in living memory, in World War I and World War II, and also defeated France in the Franco-German War of 1870/71; (see also FrenchGerman enmity)). However, after the project for a European Defence Community failed in the French National Assembly in 1954, France agreed to West German accession to NATO and rearmament.


With growing tensions between the Soviet Union and the West, especially after the Korean War, this policy was to be revised. While the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) was already secretly rearming, the seeds of a new West German force started in 1950 when former high-ranking German officers were tasked by Chancellor Konrad Adenauer to discuss the options for West German rearmament. The results of a meeting in the monastery of Himmerod formed the conceptual base to build the new armed forces in West Germany. The Amt Blank (Blank Agency, named after its director Theodor Blank), the predecessor of the later Federal Ministry of Defense, was formed the same year to prepare the establishment of the future forces. Hasso von Manteuffel, a former general of the Wehrmacht and liberal politician, submitted the name Bundeswehr for the new forces. This name was later confirmed by the West German Bundestag.

The Bundeswehr was officially established on the 200th birthday of Scharnhorst on 12 November 1955. In personnel and education terms, the most important initial feature of the new German armed forces was to be their orientation as citizen defenders of a democratic state, fully subordinate to the political leadership of the country.[6] A personnel screening committee was created to make sure that the future colonels and generals of the armed forces were those whose political attitude and experience would be acceptable to the new democratic state.[7] There were a few key reformers, such as General Ulrich de Maiziere, General Graf von Kielmansegg, and Graf von Baudissin,[8] who reemphasised some of the more democratic parts of Germanys armed forces history in order to establish a solid civil-military basis to build upon.

After an amendment of the Basic Law in 1955, West Germany became a member of NATO. The first public military review took place at Andernach, in January 1956.[9] A US Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG) helped with the introduction of the Bundeswehr's initial equipment and war material, predominantly of American origin.[citation needed] In 1956, conscription for all men between the ages of 18 and 45 was reintroduced, later augmented by a civil alternative with longer duration (see Conscription in Germany). In response, East Germany formed its own military force, the Nationale Volksarmee (NVA), in 1956, with conscription being established only in 1962. The Nationale Volksarmee was eventually dissolved with the reunification of Germany in 1990. Compulsory conscription was finally ended in January 2011.

The Bundeswehr was the first NATO-member to use the Soviet-built MiG 29 jet, taken over from the former East German Air Force.

During the Cold War the Bundeswehr was the backbone of NATO's conventional defence in Central Europe. It had a strength of 495,000 military and 170,000 civilian personnel. The Army consisted of three corps with 12 divisions, most of them heavily armed with tanks and APCs. The Luftwaffe owned significant numbers of tactical combat aircraft and took part in NATO's integrated air defence (NATINAD). The Navy was tasked and equipped to defend the Baltic Approaches, to provide escort reinforcement and resupply shipping in the North Sea and to contain the Soviet Baltic Fleet.



Bundesgrenzschutz1951-1955
http://www.panzerbaer.de/helper/bw_bgs_fz-a.htm

In German

http://de.academic.ru/dic.nsf/dewiki/795288


http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_alle ... eutschland

Eddy






Last edited by eddywillems on May 16th, 2012, 11:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 4th, 2011, 7:09 pm

May 18th, 2012, 11:24 am #8

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