a silly question about Touch'n Flow applicator

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a silly question about Touch'n Flow applicator

Joined: August 14th, 2001, 10:30 am

October 15th, 2006, 8:09 am #1

as i live in France, the Touch 'n 'flow seems mysterious for me : how does it work ?? the glue must be inside ?? what kind of glue ? and i suppose thet the glue dry into the applicator when you not use it....a little help please ; thank
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

October 16th, 2006, 1:48 am #2

Basically its a glass tube with a very fine hollow metal filament/needle.

It's used to apply solvent type glues like Tenax

To see how it works, take a glass of water and put a drinking straw in it. Hold your finger over the top of the straw, and pull it out of the glass. There will be water trapped in the straw by the vacuum. When you remove your finger the water flows back out the straw.

I personally don't like these. I always get the glue running all over. The only time I did use them with any success was making large plexiglass bonnets for museum displays, as the joints were 2 to 4 feet long and a brush would only handle an inch or two.

DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: August 14th, 2001, 10:30 am

October 16th, 2006, 11:11 am #3

nt
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Joined: April 15th, 2003, 3:23 am

October 18th, 2006, 4:32 pm #4

as i live in France, the Touch 'n 'flow seems mysterious for me : how does it work ?? the glue must be inside ?? what kind of glue ? and i suppose thet the glue dry into the applicator when you not use it....a little help please ; thank
I picked up a Touch 'N Flow a short while ago and I am already very addicted to it! I find the device allows one to very precisely apply very small amounts of solvent type glue to plastic or styrene parts. I find this particularly useful when attaching small parts or bits made from thin sheet styrene as a brush applicator always applies just a little too much cement for such delicate operations.

They key to using it is to only partially fill it; the liquid glue/solvent should be maybe 2-3 cm from the base of the glass tube. Once it has been filled, just lay it down on your work bench. If stored vertical it will leak glue all over your bench (not good).

When you need to apply some glue, pick up the device and tip it at an angle somewhere between 45 and 90 degrees; practice and experience will enable one to find the 'optimal' angle. Shortly after tipping the device, one will see a small bead of liquid glue/solvent form on the end of the metal tip. This can then be applied as desired to the plastic bits being joined. When I use it, I don't usually let a drop form first before I apply the glue to the plastic. I prefer to gently touch the metal tip to the part (ie. the join between two pieces) and let the glue flow into the join until I am satisfied enough cement has been deposited for a good strong join. To stop the flow of glue, simply remove the applicator tip from the plastic and put the device back down onto your bench. While lying horizontal on your bench the device will not leak glue (surface tension in liquids is a beautiful thing). I believe that in this way one is able to precisely apply liquid solvent/glue without flooding the part and/or the surounding area with excess cememt, an action that will often require one to later sand away glue marks.

I only fill the device when I need to use it. If it is left on one's bench filled, the glue will evaporate within a few hours. To avoid wasting glue I generally fill it with small amounts of glue and refill as often as is required. Filling the device is easy; simply stand it in a full bottle of solvent and allow the desired amount of glue to flow into the glass tube. Because the diameter of the metal tip is very small (less than .5 mm) and because of liquid surface tension, the glue doesn't just rush in like a wild flood. I have found that it often takes a minute or so to get 2-3 cm of glue into the device so filling is not a haphazard or error prone operation.

When I have finished a construction session, I always empty any remaining glue back into the appropriate bottle. I find it is also a good idea to periodically drain some laquer thinner through the device to clean out any plastic residue buildup at the very small metal tip (fill it with laquer thinner using the same method as for glue). It is important to use brand spanking new (clean) laquer thinner for this as we wouldn't want to allow paint pigment or other gunge to clog up the very fine metal applicator tip.

I hope this information or opinion helps you.

Cheers - Dan
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Joined: August 14th, 2001, 10:30 am

October 19th, 2006, 7:00 am #5

on minute or so for the glue to run into the device !!!! its explain what i never saw glue into my touch n flow because i'm not waiting so long...i will try again !!thank for the info
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

October 20th, 2006, 5:43 pm #6

I picked up a Touch 'N Flow a short while ago and I am already very addicted to it! I find the device allows one to very precisely apply very small amounts of solvent type glue to plastic or styrene parts. I find this particularly useful when attaching small parts or bits made from thin sheet styrene as a brush applicator always applies just a little too much cement for such delicate operations.

They key to using it is to only partially fill it; the liquid glue/solvent should be maybe 2-3 cm from the base of the glass tube. Once it has been filled, just lay it down on your work bench. If stored vertical it will leak glue all over your bench (not good).

When you need to apply some glue, pick up the device and tip it at an angle somewhere between 45 and 90 degrees; practice and experience will enable one to find the 'optimal' angle. Shortly after tipping the device, one will see a small bead of liquid glue/solvent form on the end of the metal tip. This can then be applied as desired to the plastic bits being joined. When I use it, I don't usually let a drop form first before I apply the glue to the plastic. I prefer to gently touch the metal tip to the part (ie. the join between two pieces) and let the glue flow into the join until I am satisfied enough cement has been deposited for a good strong join. To stop the flow of glue, simply remove the applicator tip from the plastic and put the device back down onto your bench. While lying horizontal on your bench the device will not leak glue (surface tension in liquids is a beautiful thing). I believe that in this way one is able to precisely apply liquid solvent/glue without flooding the part and/or the surounding area with excess cememt, an action that will often require one to later sand away glue marks.

I only fill the device when I need to use it. If it is left on one's bench filled, the glue will evaporate within a few hours. To avoid wasting glue I generally fill it with small amounts of glue and refill as often as is required. Filling the device is easy; simply stand it in a full bottle of solvent and allow the desired amount of glue to flow into the glass tube. Because the diameter of the metal tip is very small (less than .5 mm) and because of liquid surface tension, the glue doesn't just rush in like a wild flood. I have found that it often takes a minute or so to get 2-3 cm of glue into the device so filling is not a haphazard or error prone operation.

When I have finished a construction session, I always empty any remaining glue back into the appropriate bottle. I find it is also a good idea to periodically drain some laquer thinner through the device to clean out any plastic residue buildup at the very small metal tip (fill it with laquer thinner using the same method as for glue). It is important to use brand spanking new (clean) laquer thinner for this as we wouldn't want to allow paint pigment or other gunge to clog up the very fine metal applicator tip.

I hope this information or opinion helps you.

Cheers - Dan
I agree... cleaning with CLEAN laquer thinner is a must. Also use CLEAN glue. If you dip a brush in glue, onto a model, back into the glue, etc. you will get plastic in the glue, making it cloudy. The plastic will mess up the Touch N Flow.
DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: May 20th, 2004, 12:41 am

October 21st, 2006, 6:24 am #7

as i live in France, the Touch 'n 'flow seems mysterious for me : how does it work ?? the glue must be inside ?? what kind of glue ? and i suppose thet the glue dry into the applicator when you not use it....a little help please ; thank
I use a draftsman's ink tip (3) that came with a STAEDTLER compass set.



Just use your cement as the 'ink well', dip in the pen tip, touch the tip to the seam and the cement is released. The adjusting screw allows me to control how much cement the tip holds.

Much nicer to let the pen tip 'hold' the cement rather then relying on yourself to keep your finger over the top of a tube! I evision lots of spillage.

Various calligraphy and drawing nibs would be suitable as well.

http://www.currys.com/pennibs/prodinfo1 ... 4&catID=17

Ken
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

October 21st, 2006, 1:07 pm #8

very handy!
DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: August 14th, 2001, 10:30 am

November 3rd, 2006, 4:28 pm #9

nt
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