A question of Stowage.

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Hosted by Luciano Rodriguez and Pat Johnston, this discussion group is dedicated to 1/48 scale AFV, vehicle and figure modelling.

A question of Stowage.

Joined: May 21st, 2005, 10:53 am

June 21st, 2012, 9:08 am #1

Hi all

I've built a few 48 tanks in the past but I'm still really a novice. I'm currently working on a 48th Tamiya Stug III G. I want to try a winter white wash finish. Plus I am going to add a fair bit of stowage, mainly from the Legend set.

[/IMG]

My question is when in the process should I attach the stowage, prior to priming paints. or should I assemble everything and then paint the major colours and work on the stowage later? Or should it be a little of both, i.e base colours on the vehicle, but paint much of the stowage off the vehicle.

All and any tips appreciated.

Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
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Joined: November 1st, 2003, 7:48 am

June 21st, 2012, 11:06 am #2

I have one of those in the stash, where did the barrel and etch come from they look great? For what it's worth I'd paint that lot in place but suggest you wait for one of the proper armour modellers to answer

David's Model Pages

David's Model Pages on Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/modelscale
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Joined: July 11th, 2005, 1:07 pm

June 21st, 2012, 11:09 am #3

Hi all

I've built a few 48 tanks in the past but I'm still really a novice. I'm currently working on a 48th Tamiya Stug III G. I want to try a winter white wash finish. Plus I am going to add a fair bit of stowage, mainly from the Legend set.

[/IMG]

My question is when in the process should I attach the stowage, prior to priming paints. or should I assemble everything and then paint the major colours and work on the stowage later? Or should it be a little of both, i.e base colours on the vehicle, but paint much of the stowage off the vehicle.

All and any tips appreciated.

Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
Hi Calum

I'm not the best painter in the world, but here goes.

The answer is really what works best for you. Simple as that.

If you look at the work of the guys on hear you will see that some ie Pat Johnson assemble everthing including stowage and then paint it in situ. Other paint it seperatley and then add after the main paint work but before weathering.

I suggest you look at the in progress pics of the guys here and look how they do there stowage. Then practice useing some old kits.

There are also some books which show how to do things. The Osprey modelling series is good ie Steve Zaloga etc. Check the Osprey web site. Im sure there are u tube step by step gudies as well, but I have not looked.


One idea i have found is
Soft items like canvas, bedding rolls, webbing items are difficult to get the right look as they are soft. So sometimes its best to add these before painting to avoid gaps and that added hard plastic look. Some guys cover the model in cling film ( clear cooking film ). Then add all the stowage using model putty etc ( Not glue, it melts the cling film). The cling film allows the stowage to follow the shape of the tank but stops it sicking to the tank.Once all stowage is palced and fully dry, remove. Then paint the stowage seperatley and glue back on when tank painted. Hope this makes sense as difficult to describe in words !!!

But do general weathering ie dust, mud etc WITH stowage on the tank as it blends the items together.

Generaly I used a combination of all all 3 style, add on before paint, add on after and the above. There no hard and fast rules.

hope this helps.

andrew

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Joined: June 4th, 2011, 7:09 pm

June 21st, 2012, 11:11 am #4

Hi all

I've built a few 48 tanks in the past but I'm still really a novice. I'm currently working on a 48th Tamiya Stug III G. I want to try a winter white wash finish. Plus I am going to add a fair bit of stowage, mainly from the Legend set.

[/IMG]

My question is when in the process should I attach the stowage, prior to priming paints. or should I assemble everything and then paint the major colours and work on the stowage later? Or should it be a little of both, i.e base colours on the vehicle, but paint much of the stowage off the vehicle.

All and any tips appreciated.

Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
I dont see a problem in painting it separately, with the stowage attached it would be difficult to make chipping and peeling of white wash on the rear wall of the superstructure. And it is easier to correct the stowage painting if you are not satisfied with the look while it is not attached.

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/
https://www.facebook.com/rvscale/
https://roman-the-modelmaker.blogspot.no/
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Joined: April 27th, 2005, 1:33 pm

June 21st, 2012, 3:05 pm #5

Hi all

I've built a few 48 tanks in the past but I'm still really a novice. I'm currently working on a 48th Tamiya Stug III G. I want to try a winter white wash finish. Plus I am going to add a fair bit of stowage, mainly from the Legend set.

[/IMG]

My question is when in the process should I attach the stowage, prior to priming paints. or should I assemble everything and then paint the major colours and work on the stowage later? Or should it be a little of both, i.e base colours on the vehicle, but paint much of the stowage off the vehicle.

All and any tips appreciated.

Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
In my experience, for stowage that has to be closely fitted to the model, attaching it during the build avoids the dreaded "floating stowage blight" - I used to add it all at the end, but a few rounds of AMPS judging and I learned that it's a lot better to get a tight fit and deal with the painting issues.

If you are concerned with trying to paint complex stowage piles on the model, although it doesn't look as sexy in your build photographs, you can prepaint the basic colors on the stowage items before attaching them to the unpainted model during the build, mask them during the painting phase and then go back and finish painting them in the same manner as unpainted attached stowage after the basic colors of the model are on.

For things that can be fitted and removed with confidence that they will go back on without any gaps - which might even be a complex stowage pile mounted on a relatively simple surface, I leave them loose and paint them separately because it easier to get a crisp finish. By way of example, on my Pz. III H project the hull MG, jerry cans, folded tarp, large fender stowage box, tow cables, spare track and spare road wheels are all still loose to make painting easier.

HTH

Konrad
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Joined: May 21st, 2005, 10:53 am

June 21st, 2012, 9:05 pm #6

I have one of those in the stash, where did the barrel and etch come from they look great? For what it's worth I'd paint that lot in place but suggest you wait for one of the proper armour modellers to answer

David's Model Pages

David's Model Pages on Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/modelscale
Hi David

the Etch is in the legend set as is all the light resin. the darker resin is from a verlinden set. The barrel is from RB models



Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
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Joined: May 21st, 2005, 10:53 am

June 21st, 2012, 9:06 pm #7

Hi Calum

I'm not the best painter in the world, but here goes.

The answer is really what works best for you. Simple as that.

If you look at the work of the guys on hear you will see that some ie Pat Johnson assemble everthing including stowage and then paint it in situ. Other paint it seperatley and then add after the main paint work but before weathering.

I suggest you look at the in progress pics of the guys here and look how they do there stowage. Then practice useing some old kits.

There are also some books which show how to do things. The Osprey modelling series is good ie Steve Zaloga etc. Check the Osprey web site. Im sure there are u tube step by step gudies as well, but I have not looked.


One idea i have found is
Soft items like canvas, bedding rolls, webbing items are difficult to get the right look as they are soft. So sometimes its best to add these before painting to avoid gaps and that added hard plastic look. Some guys cover the model in cling film ( clear cooking film ). Then add all the stowage using model putty etc ( Not glue, it melts the cling film). The cling film allows the stowage to follow the shape of the tank but stops it sicking to the tank.Once all stowage is palced and fully dry, remove. Then paint the stowage seperatley and glue back on when tank painted. Hope this makes sense as difficult to describe in words !!!

But do general weathering ie dust, mud etc WITH stowage on the tank as it blends the items together.

Generaly I used a combination of all all 3 style, add on before paint, add on after and the above. There no hard and fast rules.

hope this helps.

andrew
I understood your explaination re the use of cling film

Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
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Joined: May 21st, 2005, 10:53 am

June 21st, 2012, 9:07 pm #8

I dont see a problem in painting it separately, with the stowage attached it would be difficult to make chipping and peeling of white wash on the rear wall of the superstructure. And it is easier to correct the stowage painting if you are not satisfied with the look while it is not attached.

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/
.

Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
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Joined: May 21st, 2005, 10:53 am

June 21st, 2012, 9:09 pm #9

In my experience, for stowage that has to be closely fitted to the model, attaching it during the build avoids the dreaded "floating stowage blight" - I used to add it all at the end, but a few rounds of AMPS judging and I learned that it's a lot better to get a tight fit and deal with the painting issues.

If you are concerned with trying to paint complex stowage piles on the model, although it doesn't look as sexy in your build photographs, you can prepaint the basic colors on the stowage items before attaching them to the unpainted model during the build, mask them during the painting phase and then go back and finish painting them in the same manner as unpainted attached stowage after the basic colors of the model are on.

For things that can be fitted and removed with confidence that they will go back on without any gaps - which might even be a complex stowage pile mounted on a relatively simple surface, I leave them loose and paint them separately because it easier to get a crisp finish. By way of example, on my Pz. III H project the hull MG, jerry cans, folded tarp, large fender stowage box, tow cables, spare track and spare road wheels are all still loose to make painting easier.

HTH

Konrad
.

Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
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Joined: April 25th, 2005, 12:47 am

June 22nd, 2012, 3:12 pm #10

Hi all

I've built a few 48 tanks in the past but I'm still really a novice. I'm currently working on a 48th Tamiya Stug III G. I want to try a winter white wash finish. Plus I am going to add a fair bit of stowage, mainly from the Legend set.

[/IMG]

My question is when in the process should I attach the stowage, prior to priming paints. or should I assemble everything and then paint the major colours and work on the stowage later? Or should it be a little of both, i.e base colours on the vehicle, but paint much of the stowage off the vehicle.

All and any tips appreciated.

Cheers

Calum

http://a4alley.t35.com/
I built a Pershing, not yet painted. All of the resin pieces I drill a hole into and placed tiny magnets.
I also placed magnets in the tank. Now I can remove and replace the stowage for painting or if I get tired of the tank and use it on another.

Owen
Just recently one of our great Politicians is proposing a bill to ban tiny magnets as children are swallowing them.
Like they won't just swallow something else?
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