How bad will attendance be at the Bungs home opener?

Joined: January 25th, 2016, 12:53 am

June 19th, 2018, 11:58 pm #1

I know it’s only June and it doesn’t matter at all, but I’m interested to see how many people show up for the Bungs home opener on a Thursday night against the Ratbirds. I bet it’s going to be hilarious, as in, worse attendance than in the 2011 season. I’ll go with 35,000 people. Lmao.
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Joined: January 28th, 2007, 11:34 am

June 21st, 2018, 2:11 pm #2

I dunno. The Fans of Cincinnati are sheople and fickle. It's the biggest contradiction ever. They don't know when to quit and they quit too soon.
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Joined: December 14th, 2001, 1:34 am

June 23rd, 2018, 2:54 am #3

My guess is standing room only 
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Why does anyone go ?
Why does anyone go ?

July 15th, 2018, 1:35 pm #4

When the Bengal players started protesting our police and military .. people who put their lives on the line for us .. I stopped watching, listening to, and reading about football.   Never missed a game in 50 years.  I'm done.

Every fan wants police protection.  Every fan has or had a relative in the military.  Many have lost family members in the wars and conflicts.  The players are slapping the face of everyone in the stands.  WHY does anyone show up ?  NFL players .. who are nothing but contracted employees .. have taken over ownership.  The commissioner and owners are a disgrace to America.  The players are a disgrace to America. 
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Joined: January 6th, 2001, 1:27 am

July 23rd, 2018, 12:50 am #5

Why does anyone go ? wrote: When the Bengal players started protesting our police and military .. people who put their lives on the line for us .. I stopped watching, listening to, and reading about football.   Never missed a game in 50 years.  I'm done.

Every fan wants police protection.  Every fan has or had a relative in the military.  Many have lost family members in the wars and conflicts.  The players are slapping the face of everyone in the stands.  WHY does anyone show up ?  NFL players .. who are nothing but contracted employees .. have taken over ownership.  The commissioner and owners are a disgrace to America.  The players are a disgrace to America. 
While I generally try to be somewhat neutral on politics on this forum, I find your desire to punish people for peacefully protesting shockingly un-American and disgraceful.  The people I work with who served in the military - an Army officer who attended West Point, a former Navy SEAL, and a Marine Seargent - who all did tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan, (and are all white, btw), do not see this as an affront to the military.  They see it as citizens exercising the ideals that this country was founded on. One of the great things that military service does is show people that we're all the same...and that oppression of one of your members is oppression to all of them.

Instead of using their fame only to enrich themselves, being the stereotypical selfish athlete, they're trying to bring attention to an issue that affects many people like them but who lack the voice and the stage they've EARNED through incredibly hard work, sacrifice, talent, and dedication.  Tell me, what personal benefit are they getting?  Do you think this is easy for them?  

I hesitate to compare the two situations, but from my personal, first-hand experience, standing up to the NFL is scary - and I had NOTHING to lose compared to these players.  What's been your first-hand experience standing on a national stage, a David against Goliath, for something you believed in?  

I think the actions these players are taking represent the best of America.  Instead of just, "Shutting up and getting paid," - which would be the easy way out - they subject themselves to a torrent of racist hate from Fox News and the Far Right...for no personal gain and at great professional peril.

Having just returned from Berlin about a four weeks ago, I can tell you that what Fox and the Trump Right are doing is exactly what the National Socialists were doing from 1929 to 1938.  Don't believe me?  Go see the Topography of Terror exhibit near Checkpoint Charlie on the site of the former Gestapo headquarters...a complex which the US Air Force performed an extensive, uh, remodel on during 1945, right down to the foundation.

As HL Mencken said in 1922:
    "The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary."
The implicit assertion that there's no such thing as police brutality and institutional racism facing black people is absurd.  While I suspect there's nothing I could do to get you to take an honest examination of the issue, if you email me a postal address for a hard copy, or email address for an ebook,  (fraidycat123@gmail.com), I'd be happy to buy you a copy of, "In The Shadow of Statues," by Mitch Landrieu, the former white mayor of New Orleans.  You might find that you have a bit more understanding of why this issue is so important to these players.

In closing...
    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”― Theodore Roosevelt
Regards,

Fraidy Cat

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Joined: February 12th, 2011, 2:24 am

July 24th, 2018, 12:24 am #6

I think the solution to this is relatively simple.  The NFL and players association agree behind closed doors to keep the players in the locker room until after the anthem is played.  This is what is done in college ball and for God's sake don't publicize the decision - this will paly into Trump's strategy of using this issue to energize his base.  Keep it away from the press and media if possible.

Also Trump is a bully and wants attention as much as possible - so all the more reason to keep this decision behind closed doors.  The best way is to ignore Trump as he badly wants attention  - cut him off.
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Joined: January 28th, 2007, 11:34 am

July 24th, 2018, 6:49 pm #7

Fraidy and BungleBear...there once was a time where I would have argued with you all day about this issue...but that time has passed. I will just ask this question:

WHAT IS THE CORRELATION BETWEEN THE NATIONAL ANTHEM AND POLICE BRUTALITY?
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Joined: January 6th, 2001, 1:27 am

July 25th, 2018, 1:53 am #8

oldschoolerfan wrote: Fraidy and BungleBear...there once was a time where I would have argued with you all day about this issue...but that time has passed. I will just ask this question:

WHAT IS THE CORRELATION BETWEEN THE NATIONAL ANTHEM AND POLICE BRUTALITY?
I'll be happy to answer that...
 
Why does Jeff Wyler advertise at Bengals games?  Why did TurboTax pay around $5 million dollars for a 30-second ad during the Superbowl? 
 
I'm going to guess it's not because of Patriotism or America or the Military.  Rather, they do it to raise public awareness of their message/brand at a point when they believe people are likely to be paying attention.  That's why the most expensive ads are the ones that take place right before kickoff - particularly if you're a Bengals fan and your team is going to be down 17-0 to the Ravens by the end of the first half, and you’re going to be six Wild Turkeys deep thinking how the hell you're going to make it for the next 16 weeks.  But I digress...
 
The Anthem, like a prayer before Thanksgiving meal, is a moment for the audience to reflect on the prosperity and freedom that allow us to feast on the entertainment which we're about to receive. Logistically, it's also a near-peak advertising value time, when cameras will switch between whoever is singing, the players, and members of the Armed forces, there as per the terms of the contract between the Department of Defense and the NFL as negotiated for their appearance fee (https://www.sbnation.com/2015/11/4/9670 ... rt-million).
 
Images are powerful; the juxtaposition between these players - being the strongest, biggest, toughest humans alive - the symbol of your city (Bengal Tiger, Dallas Star, etc.), the Flag, fireworks, and fighter jets are not some happenstance occurrence.  I've worked in the entertainment industry.  I have a very good friend who has won 8 Emmy awards specifically because of the work they've done for NFL broadcasts.  I assure you that what you're seeing it is all an INCREDIBLY carefully orchestrated production, meant to convey a lot of specific ideas about America and Patriotism.  It’s also, as they say in the marketing world, a "call to action" for a target audience. 

Yet, for black people in the United States, their picture of freedom and prosperity is much more complex than the images that the NFL, DoD, and TV networks want to present.  As Mitch Landeau said in his book In the Shadow of Statues, "Race in America is not a problem you can go over, or around or under. You've got to go through it."  And, in what I believe is clearly their right under the Constitution, these players are gently and respectfully reminding the audience of the complexity of what it is to be black in America, at a time when, like Jeff Wyler and Turbotax, they believe people are paying attention to their message.

- FC
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Joined: October 3rd, 2007, 8:53 pm

July 30th, 2018, 6:35 am #9

Good to hear from you Fraidy. Excellent post, AMEN. 
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