Breaking into comics

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Breaking into comics

kacangpool
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kacangpool
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Joined: 09 Nov 2007, 07:03

29 Aug 2009, 23:16 #1

Oeming @ August 25 2009, 12:13 PM wrote:

Dan Berman and I have worked together on SIX, Thor, Beta Ray Bill and blood river as co writers and co creators and we are at it again! With interior artist John Broglia, Dan and I are writing this together and I'm doing the first four covers. God Complex is an on going monthly series from Image but guess what? We need a colorist and have decided to have an open call. So here is your chance if you are looking to break in.

If you want to take a serious shot at this, let us know, email us at oeming@gmail.com and Dan@606studios.com.

There is a sample page in this thread drawn by John Broglia (if you need a a larger file to work from email us and we'll send you one.

Winner will be announced when the book comes out in December:)

Speaking of deadlines, coloring needs to begin on this series as soon as possible so if you think you can handle it contact us now.
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seanb47
Inhuman
Joined: 14 Sep 2008, 05:56

30 Aug 2009, 18:04 #2

Oh,snap!You better go for this Kacang or I'll have your hide later!
When will someone smart enough build the cyborg body model cool enough to transplant myself into yet?

http://www.drunkduck.com/My_Comic_Art/

My DeviantART link
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kacangpool
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kacangpool
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Joined: 09 Nov 2007, 07:03

30 Aug 2009, 21:04 #3

seanb47 @ Aug 30 2009, 12:04 PM wrote: Oh,snap!You better go for this Kacang or I'll have your hide later!
tempting but i'm not quite there yet, sean. i'm still taking 'lessons' from bampi and varth.
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kacangpool
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kacangpool
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31 Aug 2009, 07:24 #4

Frank Cho @ April 30 2009, 12:19 PM wrote:Think you have the skills or talent to become a comic book artist? Now is your chance.

Doug Murray and I are looking for a talented artist to draw our comic book miniseries, 50 Girls 50:

http://www.newsarama.com/comics/090825- ... ntest.html


For more info, deadline, and page rate/royalty. Go to:

www.imagecomics.com/messageboard

50 Girls 50 section


Good luck everyone.
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kacangpool
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kacangpool
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21 Dec 2009, 19:00 #5

BREAKING INTO COMICS THE MARVEL WAY! #1 & 2 (of 2)
Written by C.B. CEBULSKI with BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, CHRIS YOST, MARC GUGGENHEIM, STUART MOORE, MIKE BENSON, KATHRYN
IMMONEN, PETER DAVID, JONATHAN HICKMAN, MIKE CAREY, SIMON SPURRIER, KEVIN GREVIOUX & FRANK TIERI
Penciled by MICHELE BERTILORENZI, PAUL DAVIDSON, SERENA FICCA, DAMION HENDRICKS, CHRISTIAN NAUCK, JOE SUITOR, TOMASSO
BENNATO, THOMAS LABOUROT, MATTEO SCALERA, STEPHEN
THOMPSON, SHAUN TURNBULL & GABRIEL HERNANDEZ WALTA
Cover for issue #1 by MATTEO DE LONGIS
Cover for issue #2 by LOST FISH


ENLARGE IMAGE Want to know what it takes to break into Marvel Comics like these guys? Then look no further than this two-part book which is a must-have for anyone wanting to be a Comic Book Breakout Star! After traveling the globe and meeting scores of talented illustrators, intrepid writer, editor and talent manager C.B. Cebulski is giving twelve rising star artists the opportunity to do their breakout work at Marvel Comics! But not only will BREAKING INTO COMICS THE MARVEL WAY showcase the work of these up-and-comers, C.B. will also provide an insider’s commentary on how these artists got their work seen and what it was that landed them the gig. And with step-by-step submission information and a sample Marvel Comics script, these books are MUST HAVES for anyone interested in doing their breakout work and breaking into the comics industry!
56 PGS./Rated T+ ...$3.99
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kacangpool
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kacangpool
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26 Mar 2010, 19:46 #6

upcoming photoshop feature:

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kacangpool
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kacangpool
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06 Apr 2010, 08:12 #7

JOE & ADAM KUBERT ON THE KUBERT SCHOOL
by Joey Pangilinan

Friday afternoon at WonderCon saw the famed father-son team of Joe and Adam Kubert talk passionately about their famed Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art, which was founded in 1976.

"I had the idea for a long time," said Joe about the school's creation. "For those of you committed to getting into the business of cartooning at one place to learn all the things required to become a professional." Joe then recanted his younger days about how it was through the help and kindness of the other established professionals already in the business that he was able to develop into the artist that he has since become.

"They even gave me pens and brushes," said Joe. "Artist or not, most people don't know what goes into the work that it takes to make these wonderful comic books."



Joe then spoke of how much an equal effort it was between him and his wife, Muriel, to get the school up and running. "I asked her 'If you're interested in running the business end of starting a school, then I think I might take a crack at it.' She did have that kind of interest, and did go into this with me, and if it weren't for her, this school certainly would not be here." Muriel's handling of the business and administrative side of the school meant Joe could keep focus on his efforts in the classroom but also his own work.

"I've been doing this ever since I was a kid. It was something I always wanted to do. It wasn't something you would or could stop."

As far as technical information goes, the three-year, fully accredited school started out with just 25 students when it was founded in 1976 – a figure that has gone as high as 200 and now currently stands at around 75, with 25 professional artists serving as the school's instructors. This includes Joe and Adam, as well as Adam's brother and fellow superhero artist Andy Kubert. While Adam and Andy teach Narrative Art 1 and 2 respectively, the elder Kubert teaches the third year course. Altogether, the curriculum consists of ten different courses that students take each of their three years.

"The average student maintains a schedule where they're drawing six or seven or more hours a day, and that's seven days a week," said Joe on the rigorous curriculum. "The only way that anyone improves their drawings is by sitting and drawing. There are a lot of people that like to draw, but don't like to draw that much, that don't like to draw all the time. Those people are not meant for the profession."

"There are ten classes a week, two classes a day, and each class meets for two hours and 45 minutes," added the younger Kubert. "After that first year you're going to figure out if this is something you want to do."

"If one of the other students said they couldn't turn in their homework because their dog ate it, I could except it," said Joe joking on the subject. "But not my sons because they still happened to be living at home."

Adam then quipped, "Yeah, there was no such thing as missing class."

"I told my sons if they didn't apply themselves as they should, I'd have to treat them even rougher than the others," said Joe. "I would have kicked Adam and Andy right out."

In addition to the three-year program, the father and son panelists talked of the school's Saturday class and correspondence courses. Saturday classes started because there were enough people in the local community that asked for it – a lot of which were younger kids too young for the regular program. The pair also cited the fact that eventually, some of these students went on to attend and graduate from the three-year program as a reason for expanding to weekends. Joe stressed to attendees that the Saturday course, and the correspondence course particularly, is something geared for more casual learning. "The deadlines are loose on a correspondence course. If it takes you a month, two months, or six months, it's no big deal. At the school, you have set deadlines for these assignments. It's quite rigorous."


One of the aspects of cartooning that is rigorously taught is the emphasis in storytelling. When an attendee asked about the emphasis on storytelling, Joe answered that a cartoonist is a storyteller. "We use pictures like a writer uses words. Imagine if the pictures don't tell the story, then you're not doing the job of a cartoonist, and that is the toughest thing to learn."

The Kuberts also boasted that in addition to the comic book professionals that are also their instructors, the school has in recent years had guest speakers the likes of Darwyn Cooke, Jimmy Palmiotti, Joe Quesada and Jim Lee come in to address the students. "It's as personal as we are here, one on one, asking questions. It's really a great situation, and the students take full advantage."

"The advisory board's job," said Joe of the group that, among others, consists of Joe Quesada, Neal Adams and Paul Levtiz. "Is to tell us what's new in the profession, what they feel publishers are looking for in the new crop of artists coming in."

"Every year, we have one or two meetings where all these guys get together and we walk them through the building and go over the curriculum with them," said Adam of the advisory board. "They're kind enough to allow us to pick their brain."

Following that up, Joe pointed out that "what results of this is that the caliber of the students that come out of this school tells all the people in the business that this is a resource. This is the people that they need to come into the business."
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seanb47
Inhuman
Joined: 14 Sep 2008, 05:56

06 Apr 2010, 14:23 #8

Awesome! :thbsup: Yeah,I don't know if I'd have what it would take to go forward with something of that level of committed drawing at this stage in my life. [thinking] That is a lot of drawing on a weekly basis!
When will someone smart enough build the cyborg body model cool enough to transplant myself into yet?

http://www.drunkduck.com/My_Comic_Art/

My DeviantART link
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kacangpool
Living Tribunal
kacangpool
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Joined: 09 Nov 2007, 07:03

19 Apr 2010, 07:49 #9

C2E2: BREAKING INTO COMICS THE MARVEL WAY
by Shaun Manning

Saturday afternoon at the Chicago Comic and Entertainment Expo, Marvel Comics held its Breaking in to Comics panel, which would seem to complement the recently-published two-issue series giving advice on how fans can turn pro. CBR was on hand for the panel, which was moderated by Manager of Sales Communications Arune Singh and Talent Coordinator C.B. Cebulski and featured editor Tom Brevoort and writers Jonathan Hickman, Fred Van Lente, Jeph Loeb, Marjorie Liu, and artists Mike Choi and Chris Sotomayor.


"Breaking Into Comics the Marvel Way" #2 on sale now

The panel began with the panelists describing how they found work at Marvel, with Cebulski recounting Mark Waid's analogy that “Breaking into comics is like breaking out of jail: once you find a way, that way is closed forever.” Speaking first, Singh said his route was circuitous (and included an extended stint at Comic Book Resources), ending lightheartedly with, “I wanted to be in the military. I was going to fight terrorists, now I fight bad PR.” A fan shouted, “It's not too late!”

Choi, like Singh, went to business school, but unlike Singh did enter the field for a time before making the jump to comics. Liu's path stemmed directly from her other job, writing sci-fi novels.

Loeb, who has been in the business longest, noted that his work on movies like “Teen Wolf” and “Commando” led him to work on a film version of “The Flash.” “As happens in the movie business, you've never seen that movie,” he said. “But Jeanette Kahn, who was the then-publisher of DC Comics, said, ‘If you're not going to write a movie for us, would you like to write a comic?” After failing to negotiate his way onto a Superman or Batman title, Loeb landed on “Challengers of the Unknown,” which he knew nothing about at the time. “I think they were thinking, I don't think he can hurt them too badly.” Loeb's collaborator on that book—and many since—Tim Sale was also breaking in at the time, after he had been “drawing greeting cards and selling them at street fairs in Seattle.” Sale was discovered for comics through samples he was distributing at conventions.

Van Lente described creating “Silencers” with “High Moon's” Steve Ellis, which was published by Moonstone. His big break came, though, after showing the book to then-Tokyopop editor Mark Paniccia, who, after moving to Marvel, asked Van Lente to pitch a new female Scorpion for “Amazing Fantasy.”

Hickman graduated with an architecture degree. “But I hated that,” he said. Hickman then worked in design and in an ad agency before putting together an Image comics submission. “I FedExed it on Wednesday, had a gig on Friday, quit my job on Monday.”

Brevoort tried for an internship with Marvel and DC during his college years.“Marvel got back to me; DC never did. So in the summer of 1989, I was a Marvel intern. I worked with three editorial offices, and wasn't terrible at it.” When an assistant editor position opened three months later, he applied. “I've been hanging around ever since.”


Tom Brevoort and Jonathan Hickman at C2E2 2010

Cebulski described his background in manga, living in Japan and then working for Central Park Media upon his return to the States. He was looking for a way to bridge the gap between superhero comics and manga, which placed him well when Marvel adapted a Spider-Man manga which Cebulski translated and edited.

“As you can see from the stories, people start in one role and magically end up in another,” Cebulski concluded. “It's not about what you studied or what you know or who you know, it's a passion for comics.” He noted that the digital age has made it easier to publish and break in, but the difficulty “is parleying that into the next job—you're only as good as your last comic.”

Cebulski then opened the floor to questions. The first dealt with how a writer can get his work seen. Loeb said, “You have an opportunity here at the con to meet an artist, make a friend, and tell a story—it doesn't have to be a long story.” He added that it's not necessary to focus on A-list characters. “If you can tell a good Batgirl story, you can probably tell a good story.” His advice was simply to make it look as professional as possible.

Van Lente said he and his artist friends broke in together, “so they were willing to work with me, for free, for a number of years to make comics.”

“If your goal in life is to write Spider-Man, or a Marvel comic, you're probably aiming too narrow,” Brevoort said. “If you're trying to be a comic book writer, what you're really trying to do is be a writer.” He added that prospective writers should continue to practice their craft and take any opportunity that presented itself. Existing published work, too, is key for Marvel, as it displays that a writer has been previously hired to do the job of writing.

Liu recommended that writers “exploit your individuality. Don't try to be like anybody else,” she said.

Cebulski noted that the legalities of intellectual property also make it difficult for writers to break in. “Marvel and DC have to protect themselves,” Cebulski said.

The next fan began by asking whether he should address Brevoort as Tom or Mr. Brevoort. Brevoort said, “Tom is fine,” with Loeb adding, “We have to call him Mr. Brevoort.” The fan's question was about internships, with Cebulski saying that Marvel still takes interns and those interested should contact Sara Del Greco at sdelgreco@marvel.com. Brevoort mentioned notable Marvel interns like Joe Madureira but said that the internships are unpaid and thus interns must be students receiving credit.

Packaging and the trade department are growing fields, Hickman said in response to a question about positions at Marvel that might not be obvious to the public at large. Cebulski added Creative Services to the list.

Don't pitch editors directly, Cebulski said, because of the legalities. “Send us your work, we will read it, and we get in contact if we like it and will ask you to pitch,” he said. “It has to be something non-Marvel related that shows you know how to write.”


Jeph Loeb and Marjorie Liu at C2E2 2010

Liu and Loeb agreed that writers should not worry about their ideas being stolen. “Ideas are not your children,” Loeb said, adding, “If you have only one idea, you can't work in this business. I don't know if you've noticed, but comics come out every month.” Loeb said that it's important to choose the best idea and to determine the best one should ask three friends. “If one person hates your idea, he's an asshole; if two people hate it, that's something to think about; if three people tell you that, it's probably crap.”

Brevoort said, “There's too much equity in the concept of an idea,” but the important bit is execution. “Your execution is going to be much more individualistic. If you told the guy next to you your idea—that would be really dumb—but he would go off and do something completely different.”

Quoting Skottie Young, Cebulski said, “As an artist, there's no such thing as over-exposure,” and artists should post their work in every venue possible. But when submitting, a blog is best, “because it's one place, and as an editor I know it's organized chronologically—the top piece is going to be the newest.” Cebulski offered his email address (cbcebulski@marvel.com) and said to never send links or attachments, just introduce yourself and remind him or the editor where you met them, asking if it would be ok to send a link at that point.

Van Lente added that, if you have that presence, editors can find you. “I was trying to break in to Tokyopop—Marvel broke me.”

Cebulski also recommended Penciljack, Deviant Art, and the Millar and Bendis boards as venues to showcase and receive comments on one's work. “You will get a really good critique,” he said of the latter two.

“I don't know why more people don't take advantage of Image Comics,” Hickman added. “If you put together a good comic, they'll publish it.”

Asked about his artistic process, Choi said, “I see the script as the bare minimum of what I have to draw,” adding that he doesn't want to obscure the writer's intention but that there should be building from it. “It's the skeleton and I bring the awesome.”

“One thing, to sum up, which I think is crucial understand: it can be done,” Brevoort said. “It is not easy, and nobody is entitled to do it. But if you have the drive, and you have the talent, it can be done.”

“But it is the hardest thing in the world,” Choi said.
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kacangpool
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kacangpool
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Joined: 09 Nov 2007, 07:03

30 Aug 2011, 20:02 #10

MTV Comics And Stan Lee Launch 'The Seekers' Contest!



UPDATE: The contest submission deadline has been extended to September 23rd. We've had an incredible response thus far and have gotten numerous requests to keep the contest running. Since the timing still allows for us to narrow the field and run voting prior to New York Comic Con we are going to keep submissions open for as long as possible. For anyone who has already submitted and would like to revise your work based on the new deadline please simply upload a new pdf when you're ready, we'll only look at your most recent entry. Best of luck to everyone!

Have you ever dreamed of writing or illustrating a comic under the tutelage of the legendary Stan Lee? Well, here's your chance True Believer! MTV Comics and POW! Entertainment are offering you the chance to write or illustrate the digital graphic novel "The Seekers!"

Over the next 3 weeks we'll be accepting submissions from artists and writers for an opportunity to earn approximately $10,000.00 to do just that. You read that right, that's 10-Gs.

In order to enter you'll need to read the complete set of official rules, but here are the highlights of the contest:

● Submissions will be close on September 23, 2011
● ARTISTS will submit five (5) black and white pages of sequential comic art based on a scene from "The Seekers"
● WRITERS will write ten (10) pages of comic script and a two (2) page treatment for the series based on Stan's treatment
● Submissions will be narrowed down by the MTV Comics editorial staff to the top 20 semi-finalists in each category; that's 20 writers, and 20 artists
● Semi-finalists will be voted on by the public beginning on September 26, 2011
● The top 5 vote-getters in each category will be forwarded on to Stan Lee, who will hand select the winners
● Winners will be presented the opportunity to write or illustrate MTV Comics’ The Seekers (and earn approximately 10k)






http://geek-news.mtv.com/2011/08/08/mtv ... s-contest/
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