Kim Greene
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Joined: 10:28 PM - Nov 10, 2004

12:04 PM - Jan 13, 2018 #3021

steve:

Yeah, it's disgusting how until very recently, male rape was always taken as a joke and never seriously at all. There was a 1974 TV film called IT COULDN'T HAPPEN TO A NICER GUY, which stars Paul Sorvino (Mira's dad) as a guy being sexually assaulted by a woman, but it was basically played for laughs. A much better and more serious film on that subject is a 1985 TV drama titled DEADLY JUSTICE aka The Rape of Richard Beck, starring Richard Crenna as a policeman who is forced to change his entire sexist attitude toward rape victims when he himself is sexually assaulted by two thugs he's pursuing one dark night. (It's on DVD, but packaged with some other action flick I'd never heard of. Here's an article on a subject you also don't hear about too often---male college students and how they deal with being sexually assaulted by other men----one in particular tells the story of what happened when it happened to him, and how he managed to cope with it over time, and also of what happened when he finally made up his mind to report his attacker:

The Huffington Post---Male Victims of Campus Sexual Assault Speak Up and Speak Out

I wouldn't mind reading your article when it's finished, simply because as a longtime female rap fan, I've always wondered how female rappers, who once dominated rap as much as their male counterparts did, and were also there at the birth of hip-hop itself, seemed to literally disappear from the scene around the early '00s for whatever the reason---I didn't understand why,though. And,frankly for a while it did seem like---and still does to some extent---that female rappers were/are only allowed to ascend in the business if they put on a completely sexual image to sell themselves to the public. Like that was the only slot they became allowed to occupy anymore in hip-hop. That dosen't seem to be the case so much anymore with new up-and-coming female rappers, but that seems to be happening only because a good number of them are underground and on indie labels (some that they started themselves) and have more control over their images and careers than they would have on a major label. Nicki Minaj is a unique case in that she not only has presented herself as a sexual object and created an alter ago rapping persona, but she pretty much controls not only her own image,but her complete entire career. Plus she's developed the rock solid confidence one needs to have and the discipline to pull all that off. She's also been very outspoken about the sexism she's faced so far throughout her career (and still does, to some extent,according to a recent interview she's done) as a female artist working in what's become nearly a mostly male field, and how she's always made to feel she has to constantly prove herself, even after some years in the business, in ways that a male artist at her level would never be asked to. But I've also heard other female rappers complain about that exact same thing almost as long as hip-hop's been around, so, unfortunately, that's not a new issue at all. I introduced my brother to a British rapper you told me about named 'Lil Sims, and he recently raved about another Brit rapper I'd heard of named Lady Lesure--I meant to check out more of her stuff, and also some stuff by Rapsody, the new rapper you've mentioned.












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Joined: 5:57 PM - Oct 24, 2004

3:37 PM - Jan 13, 2018 #3022

Well, here's the article:  It was very weird how female rappers completely disappeared from the scene for a period until Minaj became a star. From what you wrote, I think I like her less than you - THE PINKPRINT is the only one of her three albums I can listen to all the way through, and her second album is totally clogged with bad pop crossover attempts. I have nothing against female rappers doing lyrics about sex, as this article should make clear, and there's a scold aspect to some of Lauryn Hill's lyrics that bothered me, but after Lil Kim came on the scene, it does seem like every single female rapper who became a star had to be a sex symbol as well. There are women who haven't gone that route, such as Lady Sovereign and Dej Loaf, and they had minor hits, but the former left the music industry after her 2nd album bombed and the latter signed to Sony 4 years ago but still hasn't released her debut album despite a long string of mixtapes and singles. Grime seems to be increasingly popular in the UK, and getting more buzz in the US without any grime MCs having actual hits, and I have read a lot of predictions that Lil Sims will follow in the footsteps of Skepta and Stormzy. 

This evening, I am seeing a one-man show about Lester Bangs. 

On a much different note, I really like the EP by Seekers International, released last December, called RUN COME TEST. It's basically ambient electronic music (the first song doesn't even have percussion) built around reggae vocal samples, often from audibly scratched records. 
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10:28 PM - Nov 10, 2004

6:37 AM - Jan 14, 2018 #3023

I'm actually not that big of a Minaj fan---I don't even know that many of her songs. I just admire the way she's basically taken control of her own career and her image,and is her own woman---as well as skillfully marketing her brand and putting it out there for public consumption. Dej Loaf's a Detroiter whom I've only heard one hit song by, but that was last year---there was a big-write up on her in the Metro Times then. I recall seeing Lady Sovereign's videos on the tube back over a decade ago, but she never quite managed to cross over to the U.S.,even though she was being called the "female Eminem" briefly at one time. I read somewhere that she'd come out as bisexual, but that didn't help her sell any more units or anything. The article was pretty good, and made me want to check out both Rhapsody and Cupcakke, the two artists you primarily focused on.

When I visited my brother and his fam for Christmas, he showed me how Spotify the music app he has, works, and how you can get your own playlist of songs on it. I made a suggestion when he showed me his list of old '50s doo-wop sons (just one of the lists he had, he also has an old-school '70s funk list) and the one that popped into my head was a classic hit called "The Stroll" by a '50's group called the Diamonds. I hadn't heard the song in like forever, so I was surprised that I even remembered the group's name, and wasn't sure if that was actually it at first. Anyway, when my brother pulled the song up on his list, a pic of some white dudes appeared with the song title, and I was like, "They're white?!" I'd heard "The Stroll" when I was little and getting into old-school rock 'n roll the same time I was all into early '80s New Wave pop music. I'd just always assumed that the group was black, since they sounded exactly like most of the black doo-wop groups from that era. You learn something new almost every day,lol. Looked them up, and turns out there were an R&B loving/singing group of white Canadian guys who had a whole bunch of hits in the late '50s. Here's the song right here---I always loved it because of how slow and cool it sounded:

The Diamonds--The Stroll

Here's one of their other big hits,which was a remake of an R&B song by Maurice Williams and the Gladiolas---I didn't know they did this song, even though I liked it too:

The Diamonds---Little Darlin'

Most of the original members of the group have since passed away----the lead singer and last original member, Dave Somerville, passed away in 2015. They were still performing in various guises throughout the years, though.

I know this is a big sudden switch to another topic, but here's a thoughtful article I found on Medium that looks at the whole #MeToo issue from another different perspective:

If We Fire All Sexual Assaulters, WIll We End Up Firing Everyone?











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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10:28 PM - Nov 10, 2004

8:44 AM - Jan 14, 2018 #3024

Here's a trailer and a link to some reviews on a new Finnish film called TOM OF FINLAND, which deals with a gay Finnish soldier's experiences after he comes back from fighting in World War II,and his choice to become an artist documenting gay life:

TOM OF FINLAND----trailer/info

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3:01 PM - Jan 14, 2018 #3025

Funny you should mention TOM OF FINLAND. I saw it last week. I suppose it's progress that someone would make a completely conventional biopic about an artist who devoted his life to drawings of men in uniform with large bulges in their pants. The opening scenes do a very good job of showing how it was impossible for men to live together as couples or even date (when Tom, whose real Finnish name I'm forgetting, picks up a guy who seems nice, sleeps wth him and then finds out that his wallet and passport have been stolen and goes to the police, the cops act like he's the criminal party) and were driven to anonymous sex in public places, where they were often victims of violence. But from there, it hits every obvious point about gay life: from their closest, gay men emerged and began dressing like the Village People, then many developed ominous coughs that wouldn't stop, which turned into AIDS. The WW2 flashbacks are inserted into the narrative awkwardly, and suffer from the low budget staging. 

Minaj has done a good job of controlling her career and doing what she wants to do, but she has made some embarrassing missteps, like a cover for Paper magazine that depicted several incarnations of herself having sex with each other, and I think some of her biggest hits, like "Anaconda," "Starships" and "Only," are among her worst songs. I don't know why her beef with Lil Kim began, but her dis song "Stupid H**" is remarkably dumb, mostly consisting of Minaj just repeating  "You're a stupid H**" over and over and over again. 

I'm glad you enjoyed my article. I haven't received any other feedback, and I was not exactly thrilled that Pitchfork ran a think piece on Cupcakke while I was in the middle of writing it. That's not Pitchfork's fault, obviously, but I still haven't had read their article. 
Last edited by Steve Erickson on 6:00 PM - Jan 14, 2018, edited 1 time in total.
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10:28 PM - Nov 10, 2004

4:53 PM - Jan 14, 2018 #3026

The main subject of the recent documentary THE RAPE OF RECY TAYLOR, passed away Dec. 28th at the age of 98. Oprah gave her a shout-out/commemoration at the Golden Globe Awards last week, and here's one of the various articles to note her passing, and the significant act of history she did:

Mashable

Afropunk

The Guardian on Recy Taylor's passing

Taylor's story was also recounted in a 2011 book by Detroit author/professor Danielle McGuire called AT THE DARK END OF THE STREET:BLACK WOMEN, RAPE AND RESISTANCE. (I'm certain I saw the author speak at a local community gathering I attended recently, but not about the book.) The documentary, by director Nancy Buirski, will be coming out for more screenings (hopefully in the D,too.)

I meant to post this last month, but I ran over my free article limit----it's an article about actress Annabella Sciorra (TRUE LOVE,JUNGLE FEVER,THE HAND THAT ROCKS THE CRADLE,a season starring on LAW & ORDER in 2006) finally deciding to come forth about her own negative experiences with a certain former studio head--it's pretty disturbing. Sciorra, a talented actress, rarely does interviews period, so this is definitely unusual for her--there's also an interview with Daryl Hannah and his treatment of her:

The New Yorker---Weighting The Costs Of Speaking Out




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6:05 PM - Jan 14, 2018 #3027

I have a streaming video link to THE RAPE OF RECY TAYLOR, but I haven't gotten around to watching it - distributors sent me around 20 of them for possible consideration for my 2017 top 10 list/critics' poll ballots, and there's no way I could've watched all of them in time. 

I listened to Sinead O'Connor's I DO NOT WANT WHAT I HAVEN'T GOT for the first time in years a few days ago, and I am really impressed by how well it holds up. I am particularly struck by the second song, "I Am Stretched On Your Grave," which combines a sample of "Funky Drummer" with Irish folk fiddling! I can hear this album's influence in subsequent female singer/songwriters like PJ Harvey, Fiona Apple, St. Vincent and Julien Baker, but I can also hear how much she was influenced by the psych/folk scene of the late '60s and early '70s, which I hadn't yet heard when this album was released, as well as Kate Bush. 
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10:28 PM - Nov 10, 2004

9:38 AM - Jan 15, 2018 #3028

Yeah, I heard "I Am Stretched On Your Grave" (the lyrics are an actual 17th-century Irish poem set to the music of a hymn from that era,according to Wikipedia) a couple of years after her second release, I DO NOT WANT WHAT I HAVEN'T GOT, came out, and I liked it---it's basically an Irish hip-hop funeral song ( a lament, as some would call it.)  I liked "Mandinka" and "Lay Your Hands On Me" from her debut,which I have on cassette some dang where. I also have a sort of greatest hits CD by her,too. Back in the day, it was clear that she was crazy as hell, and she pretty much almost stopped her own career cold after ripping up that picture of the Pope on SNL in 1990--but that's what made her such an interesting and polarizing figure,and her interviews were always fun to read. She literally gave zero effs about playing the fame game, was as untraditional-looking as a female artist could get (in the late '80s,early '90s anyway) and was very outspoken in her criticism of the Catholic church,and the abuse she grew up dealing with in her own family. She's continued to record throughout the years--her most recent release was in 2014, called I'M NOT BOSSY, I'M THE BOSS,which deals with sexism and all---she also got unofficially ordained as a priest, became a grandmother, came out as either lesbian or bi, and even did a complete covers release of early reggae songs called THROW DOWN YOUR ARMS in 2005. I haven't really listened to anything she's done in the past decade and a half since I heard a song of hers I liked called "No Man's Woman", so I'll check it out. Another song I always liked by her was this beautiful, sad ballad she did for the 1993 drama IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER, which also has some more Irish fiddling over strong, swinging, thumping hip-hop beats:

You Made Me The Thief Of Your Heart

There's also another artist named Sinead I used to like-----an Irish-singer/songwriter/musician named Sinead Lohan, who only put out two releases in the mid-'90's---only her second one, 1998's NO MERMAID, was released in the U.S. She pretty much stopped doing music just as she had broken into the U.S. market--partially due to having kids---which is understandable,but it's too bad she never got around to putting out anything after that,since she was clearly a very real talent in her own right. It's actually a pretty good CD---it's basically some laid-back gentle thoughtful Irish music with some hip-hop influenced beats----my favorite song off of it was a slow,easy R&B tune with enigmatic lyrics titled "Loose Ends"--it stands out because it's so completely different from the other songs on the release:

Sinead Lohan---Loose Ends


Anyway, I answered this survey thing from Ancestry.com that popped up on my phone a couple of months ago while at my friend's home, and while answering it, I found out that my last name is actually Irish,and that it's an old Gaelic name meaning "the son of U"--some name I can't pronounce. I honest-to-God never knew that my very common no-big-deal last name even remotely had a meaning---I just always thought it was simply a color,period. This definitely has got me wondering where my name came from---was it from a slavemaster, or was it freely chosen by my ancestors, or were some of them actually Irish,too? I'd like to find out---I just need to quit procrastinating about doing it,lol. I basically don't know jack about my ancestors---what I know of my family's history only goes back about five generations,so I don't know anything about anybody before my great-grandparents. It would be intriguing to finally find out though---like on those great FINDING YOUR ROOTS PBS shows with Professor Henry Gates.

Here's another O'Connor song I was looking for----this is basically a rap song about the 19th-century famine in Ireland that forced many Irish folks to emigrate to America---it's called "Famine", and it's off her 1994 release UNIVERSAL MOTHER---the same one her hit "Fire Over Babylon" came off of. I first saw the video for this song on a VHS video compilation I got in the mid-'90s---never heard it on the radio,since this release wasn't as big as her second popular release:

Sinead O'Connor----Famine




























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3:57 PM - Jan 15, 2018 #3029

I actually haven't heard much O'Connor beyond her first two albums and the reggae covers album, which perked up my interest. She seems to have quite progressive politics, but she hasn't always expressed them in the most effective way. 

I got a bootleg of the original version of the Clash's COMBAT ROCK, which would've been about 70 minutes, yesterday.  In some cases, the differences are not that noticeable - the original "Rock the Casbah" features congas and weird Arabic-sounding synthesizers in the background - but there are a few songs that didn't make the final cut and they also edited some songs down from 6-7 minutes  so they could cut it down to a single album.

I may have mentioned this, but "Erickson" is not my original family name on my father's side. Upon arrival in the U.S., my Finnish ancestors on my father's side changed their name to it from "Lehtimaki." Since my mother's ancestors apparently did the exact same thing in changing their name to "Davidson" upon arrival from Russia, I wonder what their original name was: undoubtedly something more Slavic-sounding. I've noticed that when I talk to people who are born in the U.S. and they ask "Where are you from?," they mean what city and state I was born in, but when immigrants - no matter where they are originally from - ask the same question, they look blank when I say "Norwich, Connecticut" and really want to know what countries my foreparents came from. 

Do you plan to sign up for a DNA test and see if you have any actual Irish ancestry? 

There's a documentary about a white supremacist named Craig Cobb who tried to buy up all the property in a small North Dakota town and take it over. On a side note, he agreed to appear on a talk show and take a DNA test. It revealed that his ancestry is 16% sub-Saharan African! He insisted this had to be a mistake and all his followers believed him. He took another test and claims this one proves he's 100% white. 

Tonight, I am seeing a restoration of the 1988 Israeli film LATE SUMMER BLUES at the New York Jewish Film Festival. It's set just after the Six Day War and follows a group of teenagers just before they have to report to the army after getting their draft notices.

Speaking of Israel, I wrote a review of the documentary THE GATEKEEPERS in 2013 for a blog oriented towards debate about Middle Eastern politics. Despite invoicing them several times and a string of tortured E-mails, they never paid me for it. I discovered yesterday that my review was reprinted by the Daily Beast! They never told me about it and, of course, didn't pay me either. Five years later, I'm sure it's too late to get paid by the Daily Beast, but I'm quite angry about this (especially since I've pitched the Daily Beast about 4 times and they have never even returned my E-mail.) When the work week starts tomorrow, I plan to E-mail their editor and see if there's any chance I can get paid now. 
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Kim Greene
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7:45 PM - Jan 15, 2018 #3030

I'd definitely like to sign up and find out about my ancestry through Ancestry.com (something I've always been curious about anyway) even though it's expensive---it takes $99.00 to get the whole process going. I should have taken advantage of a discount opportunity the site gave people last summer when they offered people the chance to find their ancestry for just $30.00 for only a month or two. I talked with my brother about us possibly both going halves on the regular normal price, but he wasn't all into it as much as I like the idea. I still want to do it,though. I've also been meaning to ask you about whether your last name is either Swedish or Norweigian, what is what it sounds like, so thanks for answering the question I was going to ask you about it,lol. 

And yeah, I heard about the documentary a couple of years back about Cobb,the white supremacist who found out that he's actually part-black---that cracked me up. The Young Turks (a group of liberal reporters with their own channel and daily show on youtube (you can see all their latest commentaries there, which are usually fun and funny, especially when they call out trumpf's BS and go off on the right-wing) did a show about some white supremacists who got DNA tests done, only to find out they weren't as lily-white as they always thought they were. Which naturally pissed them off, of course, and then they started complaining that there must be something wrong with the DNA-testing process--which there wasn't, they just didn't want to admit or deal with the truth staring them right in the face,lol. DNA don't lie,lol. Just about two weeks ago on the local news, a young woman here in Detroit got her DNA tested through another ancestry site called 23 and Me,and got some results back claiming that she was mostly European. Problem with that is, she's obviously straight-up African-American, and so knew there had to be a mistake---turns out the company did made a mistake with her results somehow---they didn't say whether it had been cleared up or not.

There was also a episode of the CBS crime series 48 HOURS that came out late last year about a man who found himself accused of murder because his father's DNA (his dad had already done a DNA test) had been found around the murder scene, and it was traced back to him. ( I saw a repeat of it a few weeks ago.) Turns out he was innocent, but the fact that his father's DNA results were accessed and used by the police to implicate him in a nearly 20-year old cold murder case was disturbing in and of itself. Basically Ancestry.com decided that no client's DNA test would be taken and used in an ongoing police investigation unless there was a actual warrant for it---they shut that down ASAP, after this case made the headlines. The sad part about that is, another man accused of the murder would up spending 20 years in jail for it---he was released when it was determined that there had never been any real solid evidence to convict him to begin with, other than the false confession the police had basically threatened/coerced him into making.

I got a cassette of the Clash's COMBAT ROCK in high school,mainly for the songs "Should I Stay of Should I Go?" and "Rock The Casbah" (I think actually still have it,believe it or not, lol) but the only other song I actually loved on it was "Know Your Rights", with its fun,lively slap-bang beats, and frantic loud guitar licks. ( It was used in a somewhat crucial scene in the 2003 indie film AMERICAN SPLENDOR, interestingly enough.) It's basically a satire which is the opposite of the title---basically saying that you really have no rights when certain things happen to you, like getting beaten by the police---not hard to see why I never heard that one on the radio. How different does the other version you have of that particular song sound from the one that was officially released?   

Oddly enough, since we were discussing Irish singers, I just found out that Dolores O" Riordan, the lead singer of the Cranberries, a hughly popular Irish rock band in the '90's, with songs like "Dreams", "Linger" and "Zombie" ,three of their biggest known hits, and some of my favorite songs back in the day--passed away at the far too young age of 46. She had a wonderful and beautiful voice with a long range,too--always liked hearing her, even though I hadn't heard her solo stuff---she'd had some major personal troubles in the last decade,though.   Here's an article on it:

MSN---Cranberries lead singer passes away

Last edited by Kim Greene on 3:23 AM - Jan 16, 2018, edited 2 times in total.
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8:14 PM - Jan 15, 2018 #3031

I read about O'Riordan's death just 10 minutes away and then saw a news story about her almost getting arrested on airplane flight a few years ago. "Zombie" is my favorite Cranberries song. I love Faye Wong's Cantonese-language cover of "Dreams" at the end of CHUNG KING EXPRESS. Here is a fan-made video for Wong's "Dreams," heard in CHUNG KING EXPRESS: In May, I'll be the same age at which she passed today. Damn. 

The bootleg actually has 2 different versions of "Know Your Rights," with one of them sounding rougher and punchier. The sound quality on the whole bootleg is not perfect. You can tell it's a dub of a dub of a dub. I  also got a bootleg of demos and outtakes from Husker Du's ZEN ARCADE (which could really use a new remastered edition - the songs are great, but the current SST CD sounds terrible.)  The sound quality of the ZEN ARCADE bootleg is actually an improvement on the official CD, although they don't sound very different. It does feature some unreleased tracks, though. 
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Kim Greene
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3:54 AM - Jan 16, 2018 #3032

I've heard of Husker Du for years, and even liked at least one song by them, even though they were never one of my fave bands or anything. But, yeah, I liked the offbeat, slightly crazy CHUNGKING EXPRESS when I rented it out years ago (it also played at the DFT back when it came out) and I remember hearing that Chinese version of "Dreams" at the end of it, and liking it because I'd always liked the song anyway--it was one of the first songs besides "Linger" that I liked and heard by the Cranberries. Here's another song I always liked by O'Riordan---she did guest vocals for this song "The Sun Does Rise" from Jah Wobble's 1994 release TAKE ME TO GOD---always liked this one because of its lively, bouncy rhythms,and because it's a happy-sounding tune:

Jah Wobble ft. Dolores O'Riordan----The Sun Does Rise


Here's an article on O'Riordan, with videos of songs by the Cranberries:

Consequence of Sound


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4:48 AM - Jan 16, 2018 #3033

If my memory isn't haywire, there was also an anti-heroin song by the Cranberries with a video where the band went through a carnival funhouse that was a minor hit in America. I liked that one too, although "Zombie" is the stand-out for me. 

If you want to check out Husker Du, NEW DAY RISING and FLIP YOUR WIG are their best albums and a really solid mixture of punk and pop. It's amazing to me that they released both albums, totaling about 30 songs, in the same year.  ZEN ARCADE is a really strange album: parts of it are hardcore punk (the second double album ever in that genre after Black Flag's EVERYTHING WENT BLACK, but side 4 of the Black Flag set compiles funny L.A. radio ads for their concerts with no music!), yet it closes with a 13-minute song that mixes punk with psychedelic guitar excess. (The bootleg includes alternate takes of their cover of the Byrds' "Eight Miles High," which they released as a single around the same time and also showed their interest in mixing punk and psychedelia,) If you want a sample of it, check out "Turn on the News," which is the closest any song from it could've come to being a hit single. I want to get the box set SAVAGE YOUNG DU, which contains an album's worth of early demos, an alternate set containing a better-recorded version of all the songs on their  live debut album LAND SPEED RECORD and their second album EVERYTHING FALLS APART, but the record label didn't estimate the demand on CD and I think it may still be out of print on that format. I could download it, but it's supposed to have a 60-page booklet and I really want a physical copy. 
Last edited by Steve Erickson on 6:42 AM - Jan 16, 2018, edited 1 time in total.
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Kim Greene
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6:16 AM - Jan 16, 2018 #3034

Here's a number of famous people who passed last year,but didn't get as much coverage as others:

Singer/actress/ordained minister and former Detroit east sider Della Reese passed away at the age of 86 in Nov. 2017. She was best known for playing on the popular CBS '90s TV series TOUCHED BY AN ANGEL, and as the tough woman who sent Eddie Murphy flying across a back alley in the 1989 box office hit HARLEM NIGHTS:

Della Reese at IMDB

ABC News article on Reese

I never post anything from TMZ because i can't stand the show and never watch it, but seeing former mogul Weinstein get slapped and cussed out by a drunk guy warranted this getting posted:

COS---Weinstein gets his

Here's a disturbing revelation by actress Eliza Dushku (BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER, ANGEL,TRU CALLING, DOLLHOUSE)about being molested as a child while working on the major 1994 box-office hit film TRUE LIES--by the stunt coordinator who worked on that film:

COS-----Actress speaks about her negative experience with stunt coordinator

Comedian/actor Aziz Ansari just got called out by a woman he briefly dated on what she felt was him not being consensual during a private physical encounter (which, frankly didn't sound like a sexual assault to me at all,and more like she should have just flat-out told him that there were certain things she didn't want to do.) I feel like she could have just talked this over with him in private, instead of putting him on blast simply because he's famous---apparently they did so over text. He did address the matter without dodging it, though:

CNN----Aziz Ansari responds to sexual assault allegation

The site who printed the woman's story is getting some criticism for doing so in the first place:

CNN----Responses to the story about Ansari


Here's the first review I've seen of PROUD MARY,and the reviewer didn't sound all that enthusiastic about it:

COS---Proud Mary boasts commanding performances,but little else





Last edited by Kim Greene on 10:17 AM - Jan 16, 2018, edited 2 times in total.
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6:51 AM - Jan 16, 2018 #3035

To be really frank, I was in a situation similar to the woman with Ansari, and for a long time, I considered it bad sex but now think of it it as sexual assault. The key thing is that the guy did something I specifically told him I didn't want to and I had to say "no" 5 times to get him to stop. I wouldn't call it full-on rape because he did eventually stop when I asked him to: it was more the sexual equivalent of getting slapped in the face than having my nose broken, on the scale of assault.  But yeah, that situation didn't need to go public and probably never would have if not for the current climate. Bad behavior and selfish attitudes can exist in sex without rising to the level of   assault.  The f**ked up thing is that the guy I had sex with sees lots of movies in NYC and I run into him from time to time. He always wants to chat, which I can only stand for about 90 seconds. A mutual friend once invited the three of us out for coffee after seeing a movie, which was a torturous hour where I was almost totally silent. I told him a few years later what the guy did to me and why I was so uncomfortable around him, and he totally understood - in retrospect, I should've said "Sorry, I'm tired" and just taken the subway home.  This guy also posted directly underneath a comment of mine in a Facebook thread about Martin Luther King today, although he wasn't responding to me. 
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Kim Greene
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9:45 AM - Jan 16, 2018 #3036

Here's that CD set of SAVAGE YOUNG DU you said you wanted,with 69 songs and all (that's a hell of a lot of music,lol):

SAVAGE YOUNG DU CD set


I finally have the CD STRANGELANDS by 1960s psychedelic rock-with-jazz/R&B influences band The Crazy World Of Arthur Brown, which I've wanted to get ever since I got their self-titled first release, which has their one and only classic 1968 hit "Fire" on it. I ended up liking that whole CD so much, I couldn't wait to get my hands on anything else by them. After reading about Arthur Brown in the book UNKNOWN LEGENDS OF ROCK 'N ROLL, where he mentioned STRANGELANDS (the music was recorded in 1969,but after being rejected by a major label at the time as being too weird, it wasn't officially released until 1989.) I looked for it for years, but couldn't find it anywhere, until I finally found it on Amazon. Haven't listened to it yet, but it definitely looks nice and weird---there's a booklet interview with Brown and another member of his band on making the music, Brown's tendency to perform naked at live shows,which got them into no end of trouble (and they even got yelled at by the French Communist party for doing so in France.) Basically, when the two other original members of TCWOAB (organist Vincent Crane & drummer Carl Palmer) left because the American tour didn't go so well, and they felt creatively stifled, Brown restarted the band with new musicians, then after creative differences, he left the band and they reformed themselves into another band called Rustic Hinge, and did their own weird stuff. Yep, that's a long and convoluted story of how the band split,reformed, and re-split again, but it's a trip to read,lol. The songs have weird as hell titles like "Purple Airport Of Love", "All Forms and Distinctions" and "Twisted Wreckage", which means they're probably fun to listen to,lol. Brown also mentioned how his partaking of a certain drug inspired him to create his own  psychedelic progressive rock band called Kingdom Come, putting out at least 3 albums and a fourth live one, under that name----I have the first one, called GALACTIC ZOO DOSSIER (1971) and it's really good if you love long, weird, spaced-out experimental rock tunes. His time with Kingdom Come was unique in that the band started and ran their own indie label to promote their work (when that wasn't even a common thing to do among rock 'n rollers back in the day.) Plus his remarkable,powerful voice,with its amazing four-octave range, has given him the ability to sing both rock & roll,the blues, and anything else he's felt like singing throughout his long and fascinating career.

Anyway, here's some of my favorite tunes from the first Crazy World of Arthur Brown release---the classic "Fire", of course, and the other ones are nice,deranged,deep and thoughtful (and fun as hell to dance to)---they would have been perfect for a horror film, or a stage musical. In fact, Brown had originally conceived the whole release as a concept album (before that was even a common thing for rock artists) but the record company he was with at the time told him he had to have some hits, so he did two covers and some normal-sounding original songs for one side, and the wild, deranged,nightmarish, operatic funky songs (the ones I posted here) on the other, creating a genuine classic in the process, and influencing a generation of rockers (including Alice Cooper and Iron Maiden) in the process. I love the live performance of this tune--it's insane---I first saw this, or another show clip with a similar performance, back in high school:

The Crazy World of Arthur Brown----Fire

Nightmare

Come and Buy

Time/Confusion

Brown's still performing today, well into his mid-70's, and has continued to make and release new music for the past five decades--his most recent release was ZIM ZAM ZIM, in 2013, and he did a major tour last year. Here's some recent interviews with him, and a track that shows he can still holler,shriek, and raise the roof with the best of them:

L.A. Weekly---Return of the God of Hellfire

Noisey----The God of Hellfire Speaketh

A track from Zim Zam Zim



Interesting (and funny) fact about BLADE RUNNER 2049----actor Dave Bautista says that he almost didn't get the role as the android in it because the director thought he was too young for it---even though he's a grandpa in real life,lol. He also co-starred in the recent action drama BUSHWICK:

The Hollywood Reporter


Early unknown jazz tune by the Crazy World of Arthur Brown---Devil's Grip

Here's Brown performing live in Munich at a show he did over a year ago----he's still got them moves like Jagger, to quote that hit song by Adam Levine/Christina Aguilera from a couple of years back:

The Crazy World of Arthur Brown live in Munich, 2016









Last edited by Kim Greene on 7:37 PM - Jan 16, 2018, edited 8 times in total.
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10:28 PM - Nov 10, 2004

10:42 AM - Jan 16, 2018 #3037

Steve Erickson wrote: To be really frank, I was in a situation similar to the woman with Ansari, and for a long time, I considered it bad sex but now think of it it as sexual assault. The key thing is that the guy did something I specifically told him I didn't want to and I had to say "no" 5 times to get him to stop. I wouldn't call it full-on rape because he did eventually stop when I asked him to: it was more the sexual equivalent of getting slapped in the face than having my nose broken, on the scale of assault.  But yeah, that situation didn't need to go public and probably never would have if not for the current climate. Bad behavior and selfish attitudes can exist in sex without rising to the level of   assault.  The f**ked up thing is that the guy I had sex with sees lots of movies in NYC and I run into him from time to time. He always wants to chat, which I can only stand for about 90 seconds. A mutual friend once invited the three of us out for coffee after seeing a movie, which was a torturous hour where I was almost totally silent. I told him a few years later what the guy did to me and why I was so uncomfortable around him, and he totally understood - in retrospect, I should've said "Sorry, I'm tired" and just taken the subway home.  This guy also posted directly underneath a comment of mine in a Facebook thread about Martin Luther King today, although he wasn't responding to me. 
Yeah, the messed-up part about the type of experience you had is that it's a probably lot more common in daily life than people let on, for both men and women---people are just really coming out about that more since the #MeToo movement took off.
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Joined: 5:57 PM - Oct 24, 2004

2:32 PM - Jan 16, 2018 #3038

I've heard "Fire," but nothing else by Brown. I will check him out on Spotify. The rest of his work sounds fascinating. 

I started talking about my experience at the start of the #MeToo movement, but honestly the response I got made me feel like I should mostly keep it under wraps. I trust you a lot, but I told this to a number of friends, and they kept  telling me how I should feel about it in ways that were inadvertently patronizing, like "you are a rape victim and you need years of counseling to get over this." Let me decide how to define what happened to me! I'm not trying to minimize or trivialize what happened, but honestly, the fact that I got hit by a car walking back from a midnight movie in 2006 had at least as big an impact on my life. 
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10:28 PM - Nov 10, 2004

6:56 PM - Jan 16, 2018 #3039

To be fair, it sounds like your friends were only trying to be helpful in the best way they can/know how,even if that's not how it came off to you. And, yeah, you (and anyone else that's been through this) have the right to define what happened to you and how to process that in a way that's best for you to deal with it. Did you ever tell the guy flat-out that you didn't want to ever speak to him again,period--not even to chat? And what type of responses--if you don't mind my asking---did you get when bringing it up in the context of the #MeToo movement that made you not want to discuss it anymore?

Unfortunately, what I thought would probably happen in the contest of this whole outing of sexual harrassers and harassment is that some women are using this as an opportunity to settle a score with some men they have issues with, like in the case of Aziz Ansari. Which is not even what this whole #MeToo issue is about,anyway. It was pointed out that the woman he went on the date with didn't actually tell him that he was making her uncomfortable---she said that she thought he would get the non-verbal cues she was putting out that she was. The thing is, she should have opened her mouth and told him flat-out that she was uncomfortable---the reality is, you can't expect someone,especially someone you barely know, to read your non-verbal clues that you're not into something,and especially if you don't tell them that you aren't. So part of what happened was on her,too. It would have been one thing if she'd actually told him not to do certain things, but that wasn't the case there. Plus, like I said, putting someone on blast in the media about a not-pleasant sexual encounter well after the fact is pretty despicable---especially since she had already texted him about it right after the fact,and he apologized and said he didn't know that he was making her uncomfortable--since she never actually told him that he was. Seriously,it seems that some people don't really have a good,specific definition of what sexual assault actually is, and they need to make sure they know exactly what that is before being so quick to accuse somebody of it. 

I'm referring primarily to the Ansari case here, though. Another recent example is singer/songwriter Seal, who's just been accused of sexual battery by a female friend/neighbor of his. Yeah, he was wrong to force a kiss on her and grope her (this happened about a year and a half ago) but did it really warrant her calling the police on him and pressing charges? I don't think so. Here's the story on that:

The Mercury News

Last edited by Kim Greene on 6:51 AM - Jan 24, 2018, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 5:57 PM - Oct 24, 2004

7:31 PM - Jan 16, 2018 #3040

I pretty much said it above. I got told that I was wrong to describe what happened to me as assault, not rape, and that I needed to go into counseling and spend years discussing this incident in order to have any chance of living a healthy life. And when I insisted on the importance of my own definition of incidents in my life, I was told I was in denial and that I still didn't fully understand what happened. A lot of this came from a male rape victim I know, and I think too many people have a tendency to think that their own experiences apply exactly to everyone else. 

No, I haven't told the guy I don't want to talk with him. Confronting him about this would open a whole new can of worms and maybe make the matter worse, especially since this happened in 2002. 
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