LOGAN Reviews

LOGAN Reviews

Lenny Moore
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Joined: 18 Oct 2004, 01:32

18 Feb 2017, 01:30 #1

As someone that's felt disappointed by the first two standalone Wolverine films - the first being significantly weaker than the second - I did not have particularly high hopes about this latest, and possibly final, entry with Hugh Jackman featured as the titular lead character. However, I'm heartened by the initial reviews rolling out that posit the notion they've finally gotten the material right and executed it with aplomb.

The Playlist Reviews LOGAN

Collider Reviews LOGAN

LOGAN Trailer
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10 Nov 2004, 22:28

22 Feb 2017, 02:05 #2

I might check LOGAN out mainly because I liked the last Wolverine outing, which was set in Japan, and because the main villain is being played by the co-star of the excellent Netflix drama series NARCOS, Boyd Holbrook (RUN ALL NIGHT, WALK AMONG THE TOMBSTONES, and he's also the lead in the upcoming PREDATOR reboot.)
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10 Nov 2004, 22:28

03 Apr 2017, 01:29 #3

VANISHING ON 7TH STREET (2010)-----Directed by Brad Anderson (NEXT STOP WONDERLAND, one of my fave '90s comedies, SESSION 9, THE MACHINIST, and the Halle Berry thriller THE CALL.) This indie horror film was one of the many films shot in Detroit during the big film production rush of 2009-2011 (before the movie tax credits were gradually cut down by then governor Granholm and disposed of altogether for basically no sane reason by the then-incoming governor Snyder, which killed the film boom---there are still film productions being shot in the D, just definitely nowhere near the rate it was during that time period.) It played at only one place I know of---the Main Theatre in Royal Oak, MI---without much fanfare, and barely any promotion, other than a decent review from the Detroit Free Press. I was eager to see it anyway, since two of my favorite actors (John Leguizamo and Thandie Newton) were in it.

The film begins with a corporate worker named Luke (Hayden Christiansen) waking up after a party night in a downtown Detroit office building, and gradually realizing that he's the only one in that same building. After making it outside and seeing virtually no one else around, and empty cars up and down the street, he starts to realize that something definitely isn't right with this whole situation. ( I was walking through downtown Detroit one day, and saw this whole scene set up with smashed-up cars at the Lafayette-Griswold intersection, as well as a banner with Chinese characters hanging down the side of one building.) I asked what was going on, and was told that the new version of RED DAWN was being filmed there. On the commentary for VOSS, director Anderson confirmed that both his film and RED DAWN were being shot at the same time down there (this was during the summer of 2009, I believe.)

Another thing Luke notices is that this darkness is starting to take over everywhere. After dodging creepy shadows that actually speak with haunting echoing voices, he runs into only two other people---a young girl (Taylor Groothuis) who runs off at the sight of him, and a scared dude named Paul (John Leguizamo) trying to fight off the darkness with his car headlights. Together they find shelter in an abandoned bar (which was actually the real-life Temple Bar, a longtime staple of Detroit's now-cleaned-up Cass Corridor area. It was closed down for awhile, but re-done and re-opened about a decade ago, and is now a nightclub hotspot for millenials looking to party on weekends, apparently.) They find that two other people have also taken shelter there---a nurse named Rosemary (Thandie Newton) and a young boy (Jacob Latimore in his debut film, who's also currently starring in the indie thriller SLEIGHT) whose mother owned the bar. All four of them terrified at the fact that this strange darkness seems to be sucking up all life around them, leaving only these shadows that encourage the people to come out into the darkness. The problem for all four survivors is to find out what the hell is going on, why it is happening, and how to get out of the bar without getting caught and disappeared by the eerie soul-sucking darkness.

One thing that's unusual about VANISHING ON 7TH STREET is that, unlike most apocalyptic films I've seen, there are no alien invasions or wars involved. It's definitely creepy at times, especially since you can't always tell what's going to happen, or when it's going to happen to the main characters. Another thing I've noticed about Anderson's films is that no matter what genre a film he makes is in, it usually turns out to be something that is unusual and unique for that particular genre---just like this one. That's what made it so refreshing and different for me, and why I liked it. After seeing it, I think it definitely should have gotten more attention when it came out, but it's out on and well-made apocalyptic film shot in the Motor City, too. The commentary by director Anderson is also wroth listening to, especially the parts about what shooting on a low budget on location in the D was like.
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10 Nov 2004, 22:28

17 Apr 2017, 01:35 #4

THE VISIT (2015)---Directed/written by M. Night Shyamalan. Horror wunderkind Shyamalan slowly but quietly made a comeback with this horror film about a single mother (Kathryn Hahn) who hasn't seen her parents in nearly two decades, so when they finally get back in contact with her, she's willing to send her two children, the aspiring film director Becca (Olivia DeJonge) and wanna-be rapper Tyler (Ed Oxenbould) to get to know them. Becca decides to make a film project out of the visit---interviewing her grandparents about the family, and whatnot. Not long after they get there, it doesn't take Becca or Tyler too long to notice that their grandma, aka Nana (Deanna Dunagan) is acting pretty damn strange and going off the deep end from time to time, despite her attempts at what passes for normalcy in their home. Their grandpa, aka Pop Pop (Peter McRobbie) lets them know that she's got some issues due to old age, but it becomes pretty apparently that there's more to it than that. Especially after both Nana and Pop Pop tell them they absolutely have to be in their bedroom after 9 or 9:30 p.m.,period---that's when the really strange events start jumping off. The film has been described as a comedy with some horror, instead of a straight-up horror flick,but it's actually a nice balance between the two, and very entertaining (and genuinely scary in some parts.) Definitely a nice return to form for horrormeister M. Night, who just recently hit the box office with his latest film, the split-personality thriller SPLIT.
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10 Nov 2004, 22:28

28 Apr 2017, 02:17 #5

DON'T BREATHE (2016)----Directed/written/produced by Fede Alvarez (EVIL DEAD, OCULUS---he's also been tapped to direct the sequel to the cult film LABYRINTH.) This Sam Raimi/Robert Tapert produced horror flick (they're the creators and producers of the EVIL DEAD movies, as well as the Starz series ASH VS. EVIL DEAD) was one of a string of many fright films that came out in the summer of 2016, including LIGHTS OUT, THE CONJURING 2, THE GOOD NEIGHBOR (which barely got any promotion or play dates, but went to Netflix instead) and others. I didn't pay any attention to it, until I saw it and found out that a portion of it was actually shot on Detroit's west side, in fact not too far from an area where I lived some years ago. (The interiors were filmed in Hungary, and the exterior location shots were filmed in the D.) The film has an intriguing opening, and it focuses on three reckless house thieves---Rocky (Jane Levy, EVIL DEAD, the comedy series SUBURGATORY) and her boys Alex (Dylan Minnette, currently in the new popular Netflix drama 13 REASONS WHY) and Money (Daniel Zovatto) hitting up homes in the D for cash. Rocky really wants to get the hell out of the D, away from her mother and her mean stepfather, along with her little sister. So when she and Money read in the news about a blind man who's gotten a big wrongful accident settlement living in an abandoned 'hood in the D, they think they're hit the jackpot. Rocky sees this as her one last final score that will finally get her out of the city, while Alex, who's secretly crushing on her, isn't even down with the idea at first, but soon changes his mind just to be around Rocky.

When all three of them finally managed to break into the blind man's house, they gradually learn the hard way, especially after he wakes up, that this particular B & E (breaking & entering) isn't going to be anywhere near as easy as they thought it was, in this case. Especially after the blind man (Stephen Lang, AVATAR) turns out to be a hell of a lot tougher of an obstacle by himself alone to get past. The dude, who's also a veteran, turns out to be built almost like the Rock, despite his advanced age, and he's not even trying to let some punks get away with busting up in his crib taking his stash of cash. It's just not gonna go down like that---it's made pretty clear after a while that's he not going out like a punk for any of these young fools trying to try him. For a movie that only takes place in this one location, there's a hell of a lot of suspenseful action that goes on, involving a dangerous dog, a gun, and an unexpected, horrible surprise in the basement. Really good film, and it's nice to see a horror flick that dosen't fall back on any gore, nudity, and hipster snarkiness, and just charges ahead as the tight, no-holds-barred suspense thriller it is. If I had known this was partly shot in the D, I would have tried to get to the theatre to see it. That being said, it's definitely worth seeing---the acting is top-notch, particularly from Jane Levy, whose character goes through all kinds of insanity in the house from hell on a quiet Detroit street. Definitely one worth picking up at the store when you get a chance.

DON'T BREATHE at IMDB
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10 Nov 2004, 22:28

04 May 2017, 12:42 #6

Here's the trailer for the upcoming horror fantasy film THE DARK TOWER, based on a popular series of Stephen King books. I'm interested in this because it features Idris Elba as the Gunslinger, one of the main protagonists, so that alone gives me a reason to want to see it---and this looks pretty damn exciting:


Trailer for THE DARK TOWER
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Kim Greene
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Joined: 10 Nov 2004, 22:28

09 May 2017, 13:37 #7

SLEIGHT (2016)-----Directed/written by J.D. Dillard and co-written/produced by Alex Theurer. This lively,fun and thoughtful,sometimes very dark drama/fantasy/thriller tells the story of a young man named Bo (Jacob Latimore,VANISHING ON 7TH STREET, COLLATERAL BEAUTY) who works as a street magician to pay the bills and support himself and his adorable younger sister (Storm Reid.) Both of them lost their parents, and are virtually on their own. He's clearly talented, but there is a unique twist as to how he gets his powers to begin with, that's revealed much later on. Of course,doing magic tricks
alone won't keep a roof over their heads, so Bo sells drugs on the side, working for his boss Angelo (Dule Hill, from the popular TV dramas THE WEST WING and PSYCH.) He winds up meeting a college student (Seychelle Gabriel) while pulling off a trick she's impressed by, and they gradually start getting to know each other. Bo also has a good neighbor named Georgi (SNL's Sasheer Zamata) who watches out for him and his sister when she can. One night, Angelo calls up Bo, and they wind up going to a rival dealer's place,where Angelo threatens and beats up one of the dealer's men. Bo is understandably freaked out, since he didn't sign up for all this---he's only interested in selling the stuff, not in the being-a-mean-as-hell thug part that comes with the territory. Things take an even darker turn when Angelo decides to make an example of the dealer once and for all, and Bo is forced into doing something terrible that he wasn't prepared to do at all, and he's got some real hard decisions to make afterwards. Especially after Angelo moves him up to selling even harder stuff, and he finally decides that he's got to get the hell out of this mess, come hell or high water.

I liked the film, even though I did have a problem with once again, a young African-American protagonist doing the drug thing again. Even though it's made clear from the get-go that he's got more going for him than that, and that he dosen't plan on doing forever. Bo does make what I thought were some stupid decisions, such as not getting the hell away from Angelo after the first incident, but I put some of down to his being a teenager not looking too far ahead, and not using common sense. It was really interesting to see Dule Hill go completely against type playing a hardcore dope dealer (he's really good though.) Jacob Latimore, as Bo, brings a real likability and freshness to what could have been a stock character, showing him going through some real moral dilemmas. It's certainly a different twist on the whole magician thing,though.

Interestingly enough,SLEIGHT is the first non-wrestling film release by the WWE studios--that article tells about that here:

The Wrap

Here's an interview with director Dillard about the film, and how he might be involved with a reboot of THE FLY in the near future:

Daily Dead talks with J.D. Dillard
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