Dario Argento essay

Joined: Oct 24 2004, 05:57 PM

Oct 3 2017, 03:12 AM #1

At long last, here is my essay on Dario Argento:http://kinoscope.org/2017/10/02/dario-a ... e-inferno/. This is the second longest piece I've ever written, and although I know I'm not the best judge of my writing, I think it's one of my best.
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Kim Greene
Mobian
Joined: Nov 10 2004, 10:28 PM

Jun 19 2018, 09:23 AM #2

I noticed that the name of the director of the new thriller SICARIO:DAY OF THE SOLDADO--Stefan Sollima--sounded familiar, and wondered if he was any relation to the spaghetti western director Sergio Sollima. Turns out that yep, he's the son of the elder Sollima (who passed away in 2015 at age 94) who did THE BIG GUNDOWN (which I still haven't seen) RUN,MAN,RUN, FACE TO FACE and VIOLENT CITY.

Also just found out that one of the major Italian genre stars of spaghetti Westerns,dramas,comedies and poliziotteschis (Italian crime films) Tomas Milian, passed away in March at age 84. He had quite a memorable career from the '50s on up until the mid-'00s (his last film FUGLY! came out in 2014) and was a huge star in Italy from the late '60s thru the mid-'80s. (He starred in the first three Sollima titles I mentioned.) My favorite films starring or co-starring him are DJANGO,KILL---IF YOU LIVE, SHOOT!, SILENT ACTION,and THE VIOLENT FOUR. His last major film was the 2000 drama TRAFFIC. Here's the tribute article on him:

Variety-----Tomas Milian,Italian Genre Film Star,Passes On

Tomas Milian at Spaghetti Western.net




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Last edited by Kim Greene on Jun 20 2018, 07:47 AM, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: Oct 24 2004, 05:57 PM

Jun 20 2018, 02:01 AM #3

Milian was originally from Cuba, and he had a role as an elderly Latino prisoner in the HBO show OZ - if I remember correctly, his character's son and grandson were in the same prison. (Note: I clicked on the Variety article, and the very headline mentions his ethnicity, and the article says he eventually moved to the U.S. and wound up living in Miami.) Perhaps the fact that almost all Italian films were dubbed till the late '70s made it easier for him to become a star in Italy despite (presumably) speaking with an accent.  In a more arthouse vein, he starred in Antonioni's IDENTIFICATION OF A WOMAN. 
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Kim Greene
Mobian
Joined: Nov 10 2004, 10:28 PM

Jun 22 2018, 12:18 PM #4

That's what intrigued me about Milian in the first place--- was curious as to how a Latino dude wound up a big star in Italy, so I did some research and watched whatever films were available with him on the tube. His character of Monezza----a thief turned cop in a long-running series of comedy films---was popular because he would take actual Italian street slang and use it in the films----it seems by then, he'd actually learned to speak some fluent Italian himself.  I saw an interview he did in the mid-'80s on Italian TV and he spoke primarily in Italian--not a single word in English. Didn't know he was on OZ, which I recall hearing about back in the day, but only watched once. In fact, I could only find one interview on the tube in which he actually spoke in English at all. The only two other ones in which he spoke English were these interviews he did for the EUROCRIME documentary and for DJANGO,KILL!  I'll have to check that Antonioni film with him out,then.
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