where should I start?

Need help about Menuet ? Here is the place.

where should I start?

ssiver1
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ssiver1
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Joined: 07 Dec 2011, 01:42

07 Dec 2011, 01:57 #1

Greetings,
I've tried to teach myself how to program before and it usually doesn't go well. Once someone was helping me beginning C+ but that was awhile ago. I was wondering maybe I'm not doing something right. When I tried to teach myself assembly alot of the tutorials I found were older.
From what I've read one should get a solid fundamentals of programming down. Do I need to do a computer science program. What I've heard is it's not the language you learn but the fundamentals of the programming that's important.
Lately, I've been checking out a mit opencourseware on computer science. It is written in python. But I'm wondering if that is a good place to start.
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villemt
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villemt
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Joined: 25 Apr 2004, 07:29

07 Dec 2011, 20:54 #2

Here are three documents for Menuet assembly programming.
Example program, assembly command set and system call list (int 0x60)
http://www.menuetos.net/e64.asm
http://www.menuetos.net/cmd.txt
http://www.menuetos.net/syscall.txt
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ssiver1
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ssiver1
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Joined: 07 Dec 2011, 01:42

08 Dec 2011, 04:02 #3

Hey thank you for the links. That's alot of code on the hello example. I've seen other examples where there was alot less code. is that much code needed on everything?
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villemt
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villemt
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Joined: 25 Apr 2004, 07:29

08 Dec 2011, 18:48 #4

The actual hello world -code is the following, other parts are for defining the window, key events, etc.
CODE
mov rax , 4   ; Display text
mov rbx , text ; Pointer to text
mov rcx , 32 ; X position
mov rdx , 64 ; Y position
mov rsi , 0x000000 ; Color
mov r9 , 1   ; Font
int 0x60
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ssiver1
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ssiver1
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Joined: 07 Dec 2011, 01:42

13 Dec 2011, 21:28 #5

I went looking for a fasm book and found this:
beginning assembly programming
I guess I was looking for more should I take some classes in computer science or not. I've heard you can teach yourself to program but I wonder if these people really have a firm grasp of computer science. If I do something I want to do it well.
I've heard that programming is the new latin, in that if you have a little creativity, some programming skill, and an old computer you can write a program. I don't have much else going on right now. Other then I have heard those that learn art first have an advantage.
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Nicu
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Nicu
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Joined: 21 Jan 2012, 17:05

23 Jan 2012, 01:40 #6

QUOTE (ssiver1 @ December 13, 2011 09:28 pm)
I've heard that programming is the new latin, in that if you have a little creativity, some programming skill, and an old computer you can write a program.
This is funny and scary at the same time. It's like programming is on its way to its death (scary) but some will learn it because it's "exotic". But new computers are also good for programming.
ssiver1, before you raise questions about anyone's skills, coding efficiency or even qualification, you certainly need to take one simple aspect in consideration. Programming languages share a very similar characteristic with the languages the people speak. That's diversity and with this I mean you can say the same thing with different words.
"Hello!"
"Hi!"
"Salut!"
You could write a hello world application in one or two lines, or you could do it in 6-7 lines. Sometimes the audience makes the difference. Different teachers have different ways of learning and while some prefer to teach the most efficient way, others prefer the more explicit way, even if it takes more lines of code.
And then there's another approach. Coders in open source projects with many collaborators tend to use a coding standard so everyone can jump in and get along. The standard can be easy to follow or quite hard - it depends on how the team decides to work. And then there are projects aimed to people new to programming. These projects usually are rather explicit than heavily optimized because one of the goals the developers have is to make the code efficient enough but also easy enough to understand by beginners.
And after you learn programming, no matter which language(s), you'll find out yourself that writing code is just like talking. One day you say "Hello", one day "Hi" and so on. But as you evolve you'll change your own coding style and write the same program in different way, simply because you feel like writing one way or another.
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