Бөх / Үндэсний бөх / Bökh / ᠪᠦᠺᠡ

black man
Advanced Member
black man
Advanced Member
Joined: July 11th, 2005, 8:13 pm

April 10th, 2012, 12:04 pm #1

According to the wikipedia article on Mongolian wrestling, there are or were once Mongolian martial practices deadlier than what can be observed at present-day naadam events. The author/s link/s to a Black Belt magazine article from 1969 which refers to Genghis Khan himself as a wrestler. That said, I remember a Japanese documentary film in which they said that Temujin once killed a Tangut ruler in a "wrestling match" according to legend. Therefore, it seems to me as if the practices people translate as "wrestling" into non-Mongolian languages are most likely less narrowly defined than the modern sport of wrestling. (Same for what is translated as "wrestling" in Evenk legends, as far as I remember.) Interestingly, the wikipedia author/s also mention/s kicking being allowed among Hulunbuir Mongols, while leg grabbing is allowed among Khalkhs. (Btw, it was repeatedly claimed that Davaagiin Batbayar aka Kyokushuuzan from Ulanbaatar used "Mongolian" leg grabbing techniques in sumou tournaments.)

Different variants might have developed in different regions for different purposes. In the beginning of the wikipedia article they even mention events one of the purposes of which was the encounter of Mongolian with Manchu wrestlers. Judging from the wikipedia shuai jiao article, Hulunbuir Mongols could have their kicking(?) techniques from the Manchus. No clue about the exact rules as for the latter, but, according to a Chinese page, both the Mongolian and the Manchu practices of Qing dynasty contributed to present-day 摔跤 (shuai jiao).

Hulunbuir:
http://www.superstock.com/stock-photos- ... 4149-11367

Hohhot and Xilamuren region (don't know how representative these are since at least one of the participants appears to be a foreigner):

blog page

one more blog page
http://www.superstock.com/stock-photos- ... 4149-11275

Mongolia:

flickr page
Quote
Like
Share

sanj
Member
sanj
Member
Joined: November 3rd, 2010, 4:56 pm

July 24th, 2012, 9:24 pm #2


Quote
Like
Share

black man
Advanced Member
black man
Advanced Member
Joined: July 11th, 2005, 8:13 pm

July 24th, 2012, 9:54 pm #3

sanj wrote:
I watched the film from which this picture is. Even though the Western athletes were trained sportsmen to some unusual extent, they could not beat the local wrestlers. Another thing was that the Westerners rejected the food offered by their hosts. The Western commenter said that one host felt offended or something alike. So the Westerners were presented like aliens when mocking Mongolians. In any case, traditional Mongolian wrestling seems to have a lot to do with socialising.

Do you know whether there are any sociological or other scientific studies about Бөх / Үндэсний бөх / Bökh / ᠪᠦᠺᠡ?
Quote
Like
Share

sanj
Member
sanj
Member
Joined: November 3rd, 2010, 4:56 pm

July 25th, 2012, 9:53 pm #4

Quote
Like
Share

black man
Advanced Member
black man
Advanced Member
Joined: July 11th, 2005, 8:13 pm

August 1st, 2012, 8:40 am #5

There is an article by Tomikawa Rikido, "Mongolian Wrestling (Bukh) and Ethnicity". This author wrote some more. But it's hard to get and possibly partly in Japanese, it seems. In any case, he writes about the Shilingol Uzumchin population, originally speakers of a variant of Chakhar / Chahar Mongolic, that wrestlers are preferred marriage partners among their cattle breeders. So it might play a role as an ethnic marker in the face of the assimilation of other Mongols. Furthermore, he describes the wrestling dance movements among Uzumchin, Khalkh and Bargut Mongols as well as other things of symbolic importance. Interestingly, he finishes his article with indicating that bukh is more important than religion to Mongol identity.

Tomikawa himself was born in Neimenggu. His picture is at the end of the article. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any information about his ethnic background. I wonder whether he is a Mongol. Can anybody tell?
Quote
Like
Share

Ebizur
Advanced Member
Ebizur
Advanced Member
Joined: August 12th, 2006, 4:34 am

August 1st, 2012, 9:36 am #6

black man wrote:Tomikawa himself was born in Neimenggu. His picture is at the end of the article. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any information about his ethnic background. I wonder whether he is a Mongol. Can anybody tell?
I think he is a Mongol. He was born in Shilingol and became a three-time champion of intercollegiate bukh before teaching at a high school for ethnic Mongols for a couple years. In the year 2000, he became a naturalized Japanese citizen and assumed the Japanese-style name Tomikawa Rikidou (富川力道). At present, he is active promoting bukh in Japan and translating Japanese literary works into Mongolian.

If you want to contact him for some reason, you might try his Facebook page.
Quote
Like
Share

sanj
Member
sanj
Member
Joined: November 3rd, 2010, 4:56 pm

August 5th, 2012, 10:52 pm #7

http://khamagmongol.com/chuulgan/viewto ... 071#p12071


london 2012
55 kg Minggiyan Semenov - oyirad mongol
Quote
Like
Share

sanj
Member
sanj
Member
Joined: November 3rd, 2010, 4:56 pm

August 6th, 2012, 11:34 pm #8

Quote
Like
Share