Anyone Else Feel Like This?

Kibitzing, rabble rousing, all-round generic conversation. Any and everything. You get it.

Anyone Else Feel Like This?

Sureshot
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Sureshot
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Joined: Oct 21 2006, 03:13 PM

Nov 26 2007, 03:56 AM #1

Has anyone (especially gamers) kinda felt resistant or almost guilty for playing games about Middle Eastern conflicts. My uncle had bought Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare. Let me say the game is awesome, the graphics are great and its almost a perfect game. But they entire game is focused around you running around Iraq killing Middle Eastern terrorists "that hate our freedoms". I dunno, its almost half hearted as you play. On the bright side, it has quotes that he splashes on the screen as you die. Oddly enough, most of them are quotes from anti-war activists such as "In war, truth is the first casualty" or "Only those who have not fought a war, would want a war".

You can see a trailer and gameplay here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JC3UMJ2It4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcvklSi- ... re=related

Another one is Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Vegas. Basically you get to play black cladded police state thugs tour de force around Vegas. The gameplay is great but you still get the feeling your just playing a propaganda piece.

Gameplay:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPI2xuV3Zvk

Anyone else feel this way about anything?

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chucksheen
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chucksheen
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Joined: Mar 1 2007, 03:23 AM

Nov 26 2007, 04:19 AM #2

I got to thinking about these concerns more than 6 months back, the last time I played CS and TS.
Crucial concept to understand: Rights vs Privelages
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Lin Kuei
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Lin Kuei
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Joined: Feb 2 2007, 03:10 PM

Nov 26 2007, 06:02 AM #3

Sureshot @ Nov 26 2007, 03:56 AM wrote: The gameplay is great but you still get the feeling your just playing a propaganda piece.
Bingo. I wonder if these giant software companies receive hand-outs from the pentagon for certain reasons... the way movies have done for years... to paint certain things in a certain light....
I also wonder how games like COD/Rainbow 6 which glorify unjust wars/police state affect join-ups from late teens who grew up on these games... i guess the powers that be wouldn't be doing their jobs if they didn't capitalize on such things.


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Sureshot
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Sureshot
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Joined: Oct 21 2006, 03:13 PM

Nov 26 2007, 06:09 AM #4

Not to mention America's Army. One of the most well-made multiplayer shooter ever. Its also free.

And it is taxpayer funded and military made. It is a propanganda piece straight out of the Army's mouth.

http://www.americasarmy.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America's_Army
America's Army (also known as AA or Army Game Project) is a tactical multiplayer first-person shooter owned by the United States Government and released as a global public relations initiative to help with U.S. Army recruitment.

The PC version 1.0, subtitled Recon, was first released on July 4, 2002. Since then, there have been over 20 updated versions released, the most recent being 2.8.2. It is financed through U.S. tax dollars and distributed for free. It was originally developed by the MOVES Institute at the Naval Postgraduate School and continues to use the Unreal Engine.

Rise of a Soldier is the subtitle for the Xbox version that was developed by the U.S. Army, Ubisoft and Secret Level. A mobile phone version, published by Gameloft, is also available.[1] An arcade version using light guns is also being developed.[2]
America's Army is intended to give a positive impression of the U.S. Army. In the official Frequently Asked Questions page the developers, too, confirm that in a statement giving the reason why people outside the United States can play the game: "We want the whole world to know how great the U.S. Army is."

A graduate of Utrecht University concluded the game "with its governmental background, is instead of an advergame, better to be described as a propagame."[15] Chris Chambers, the deputy director of development for America's Army, admits it is a recruitment tool,[16] and "the Army readily admits [America's Army] is a propaganda device," wrote Chris Morris, a CNN/Money columnist and director of content development.[17]

America's Army, considered by the U.S. Army to be a "cost-effective recruitment tool," aims to become part of youth culture's "consideration set," as Army Deputy Chief of Personnel, Timothy Maude, testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee.[18]

The game has also been described as an extension of the military entertainment complex or so-called "militainment", further blurring the line between entertainment and war,[16] with criticism that it contributes to a militarization of society.[19]

The Army Game and its official webpage, which must be visited to be able to play the game, contain links to the army recruitment website goarmy.com, another recruiting tool that, according to the Army Subcommittee Testimony from February 2000, has a higher chance of recruiting than "any other method of contact."[18] Leading American players to the website is a major goal of the game, and it was confirmed that twenty-eight percent of all visitors of America's Army's webpage click through to this recruitment site.[19]

In the Frequently Asked Questions section of the game's official website, its developers argue its suitability for teenagers. It reads, "In elementary school kids learn about the actions of the Continental Army that won our freedoms under George Washington and the Army's role in ending Hitler's oppression. Today they need to know that the Army is engaged around the world to defeat terrorist forces bent on the destruction of America and our freedoms."[5]

Gary Webb argued that the game's other purpose was aptitude testing of potential recruits and that this had never been noticed by the public. He concluded that this could be the only reason for spending taxes to track players and collect statistics.[6]

On April 25 an article in a French Canadian newspaper argued the morals of the game, saying the Army has no right to try and recruit kids at ages of around 9-12 which is the more persuadable audience of gamers[citation needed].

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Kristina
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Kristina
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Joined: Jan 7 2007, 04:38 AM

Nov 26 2007, 06:13 AM #5

i dont think games like rainbow 6 have any kind of secret agenda, they just want to sell games and, well, war sells
"Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do."
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Lin Kuei
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Lin Kuei
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Joined: Feb 2 2007, 03:10 PM

Nov 26 2007, 06:19 AM #6

Oh my... i guess the military industrial complex needed a more acceptable alternative to a draft...

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Sureshot
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Sureshot
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Joined: Oct 21 2006, 03:13 PM

Nov 26 2007, 06:29 AM #7

Yeah and I used to be a member of a Americas Army clan, I was a sharpshooter. You have different classes like medics, sharpshooter, assault. You have to take actual classes in the game and sit through 45 minute lecturers and take quizzes and tests. Once you pass the classes you can then go out in the field and use your class.

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Sureshot
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Sureshot
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Nov 26 2007, 06:43 AM #8

Interesting. The company behind Rainbow Six is Ubisoft. The developer of the Xbox edition of America's Army: Ubisoft.

http://www.truesoldiersgame.com/

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Lin Kuei
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Lin Kuei
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Joined: Feb 2 2007, 03:10 PM

Nov 26 2007, 06:51 AM #9

Sureshot @ Nov 26 2007, 06:43 AM wrote: Interesting. The company behind Rainbow Six is Ubisoft. The developer of the Xbox edition of America's Army: Ubisoft.

http://www.truesoldiersgame.com/
HA! Back in 1996, partnerships were made "with big players in the entertainment industry such as Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment and Disney."
Sold their souls.
http://www.ubisoftgroup.com/index.php?p ... 3f8921ce1c
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