Q below raises a question I have: What do people want to do with any extra embryos

Q below raises a question I have: What do people want to do with any extra embryos

Joined: September 6th, 2007, 1:40 am

March 28th, 2011, 2:58 pm #1

I realize that this is a highly personal matter. I could understand people being reluctant to donate for various reasons.

I also realize this board may not have that many extras!

I truly appreciate that people do this. It's an incredibly generous gift. It has so many fantastic possibilities.

ETA: I'm not asking TO GIVE ME your extra embryos. Yikes! I just was curious because I was thinking about how few donor embryos are out there. Partly because clinics don't have programs. But people are also reluctant to donate, I suspect. I am just a little interested in the donate or not donate question.

Partly I ask this because I mentally agonize a little bit about whether I should go forward with a full on DE cycle. I guess I'll ask people's advice about this but I don't want the situation of creating many more embryos than I can use. It seems like you have to do it that way though. If only the embryos were easier to get, I don't think I would have this dilemma.
Last edited by arive on March 28th, 2011, 3:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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LizLA
LizLA

March 28th, 2011, 4:00 pm #2

ALso you have more choices with DE cycle.

GL
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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 28th, 2011, 5:13 pm #3

I realize that this is a highly personal matter. I could understand people being reluctant to donate for various reasons.

I also realize this board may not have that many extras!

I truly appreciate that people do this. It's an incredibly generous gift. It has so many fantastic possibilities.

ETA: I'm not asking TO GIVE ME your extra embryos. Yikes! I just was curious because I was thinking about how few donor embryos are out there. Partly because clinics don't have programs. But people are also reluctant to donate, I suspect. I am just a little interested in the donate or not donate question.

Partly I ask this because I mentally agonize a little bit about whether I should go forward with a full on DE cycle. I guess I'll ask people's advice about this but I don't want the situation of creating many more embryos than I can use. It seems like you have to do it that way though. If only the embryos were easier to get, I don't think I would have this dilemma.
Very, very, very few people actually donate leftover embryos, according to clinics I talked to. Even if they intended to in the beginning they usually change their mind for personal reasons. I don't think I could either.
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LizLA
LizLA

March 28th, 2011, 5:25 pm #4

What is the other choice? Destroy?nt
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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 28th, 2011, 5:39 pm #5

The other choices are to continue to store indefinitely, or to use them all, or to donate to research, or to destroy, or to do a 'compassionate transfer' during a time of the month when the embryo will not result in a pregnancy.


But since you have already donated embryos I would guess you already knew about the options and your question was a rhetorical one.
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LizLA
LizLA

March 28th, 2011, 5:50 pm #6

actually had my snowballs:)
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Piper
Piper

March 28th, 2011, 6:15 pm #7

I realize that this is a highly personal matter. I could understand people being reluctant to donate for various reasons.

I also realize this board may not have that many extras!

I truly appreciate that people do this. It's an incredibly generous gift. It has so many fantastic possibilities.

ETA: I'm not asking TO GIVE ME your extra embryos. Yikes! I just was curious because I was thinking about how few donor embryos are out there. Partly because clinics don't have programs. But people are also reluctant to donate, I suspect. I am just a little interested in the donate or not donate question.

Partly I ask this because I mentally agonize a little bit about whether I should go forward with a full on DE cycle. I guess I'll ask people's advice about this but I don't want the situation of creating many more embryos than I can use. It seems like you have to do it that way though. If only the embryos were easier to get, I don't think I would have this dilemma.
Disposition control over cryopreserved embryos is an extremely volatile and very political topic. There are many, many elected officials who think that it is the role of the government to decide what should happen to unused embryos- NOT the couple of person who created them with the intent of having a child. Ultimately, this has become a battleground for pro-life groups who believe that every embryo should have the same rights as a living, breathing child. These same groups do not believe that we should be allowed use in vitro fertilization as a treatment for infertility.

Much of the research on this topic has been done by a professor in the OBGyn department at Duke University. Dr. Lyerly's research shows that most people tend to change their minds about their preferred disposition option after they have a child. And the vast majority of people with unused embryos which they do not intend to use for their own family-building purposes prefer donation to research. The breakdown is generally about 65% prefer donation to research- despite the federal government's funding of embryo donation (and "adoption"- keep in mind, this is political) and the percentage of people who wish to donate to another family remains about 7-8%.

It is very difficult to donate to research in the US. There are six tissue banks in the US which accept embryos and at any given time, there may be only one, which is actually accepting them. A few clinics can do research under their own IRBs- generally this is done to improve what we know about infertility. And of course, there is the "Dickey-Wicker amendment" in the federal government- passed with virtually NO debate in the mid-nineties, which prevents any federal funding on any research "that many harm or cause the death of an embryo"--keep in mind, that this includes any infertility research--so the federal government puts little to no money into research about this disease.

Unfortunately, we are seeing more and more state legislative attempts to further restrict a couples' rights over their own embryos--it will not be long before we see states where IVF can no longer be practiced...



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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 28th, 2011, 6:16 pm #8

actually had my snowballs:)
I can understand that point of view.

I can also see the POV that a person has the intention of donating before they have their child/children, then sees it differently afterward.

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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 28th, 2011, 7:02 pm #9

I realize that this is a highly personal matter. I could understand people being reluctant to donate for various reasons.

I also realize this board may not have that many extras!

I truly appreciate that people do this. It's an incredibly generous gift. It has so many fantastic possibilities.

ETA: I'm not asking TO GIVE ME your extra embryos. Yikes! I just was curious because I was thinking about how few donor embryos are out there. Partly because clinics don't have programs. But people are also reluctant to donate, I suspect. I am just a little interested in the donate or not donate question.

Partly I ask this because I mentally agonize a little bit about whether I should go forward with a full on DE cycle. I guess I'll ask people's advice about this but I don't want the situation of creating many more embryos than I can use. It seems like you have to do it that way though. If only the embryos were easier to get, I don't think I would have this dilemma.
When I was married to my ex-husband, we conceived our daughter through IVF (my eggs,his sperm.He had low sperm count) and froze 2 extra embryos. We seperated when dd was 4 ms. old, and I kept getting the bill for those embryos. I kept paying it for a while, irrationally hoping that things might work out between me and my ex, but they did not. I did ask my divorce attorney what would happen if I transferred the eggs, though I didn't really relish the idea of being single and pregnant, and she said my ex would have visitation and all other rights and responsibilities, just like our daughter born during the marriage. It was a difficult decision,as I wanted more children, and knew I wasn't getting any younger (I was 33 at the time) and didn't know when or if I would remarry. However, I decided to have them destroyed. I originally wanted them donated to research, but this was 8 years ago, and the laws had changed, no longer allowing the research facility my clinic was affiliated with to use viable embryos for research. However, they were allowed to destroy them which seems odd. So much for pro-life. Anyway, I didn't want to be further involved with my ex-husband, didn't want him to have any say over how I raise my children (I have no choice about our daughter that is already here), didn't want to be single and pregnant (I was mireable and sick through about 6 months of my pregnancy. Couldn't do that alone.), didn't want to be single and raising up to 3 children. and, the idea of having my genetic child out there being raised by someone else made me sad and very uncomfortable. Plus, myex would have had a say in that, and I'm sure he never would have let me donate the embryos to someone else. He did try to get me to give him custody of them. He wanted to have a surrogate give birth to them and then he would raise them alone. Think again. He has a lot of psychological problems, but that's another topic, another board... So, I made the decision to have them destroyed. This is harder now, since I am remarried and I can't have bio children anymore. But, I think I made the right decision. He is a terrible father.
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Brigid
Brigid

March 28th, 2011, 7:13 pm #10

Disposition control over cryopreserved embryos is an extremely volatile and very political topic. There are many, many elected officials who think that it is the role of the government to decide what should happen to unused embryos- NOT the couple of person who created them with the intent of having a child. Ultimately, this has become a battleground for pro-life groups who believe that every embryo should have the same rights as a living, breathing child. These same groups do not believe that we should be allowed use in vitro fertilization as a treatment for infertility.

Much of the research on this topic has been done by a professor in the OBGyn department at Duke University. Dr. Lyerly's research shows that most people tend to change their minds about their preferred disposition option after they have a child. And the vast majority of people with unused embryos which they do not intend to use for their own family-building purposes prefer donation to research. The breakdown is generally about 65% prefer donation to research- despite the federal government's funding of embryo donation (and "adoption"- keep in mind, this is political) and the percentage of people who wish to donate to another family remains about 7-8%.

It is very difficult to donate to research in the US. There are six tissue banks in the US which accept embryos and at any given time, there may be only one, which is actually accepting them. A few clinics can do research under their own IRBs- generally this is done to improve what we know about infertility. And of course, there is the "Dickey-Wicker amendment" in the federal government- passed with virtually NO debate in the mid-nineties, which prevents any federal funding on any research "that many harm or cause the death of an embryo"--keep in mind, that this includes any infertility research--so the federal government puts little to no money into research about this disease.

Unfortunately, we are seeing more and more state legislative attempts to further restrict a couples' rights over their own embryos--it will not be long before we see states where IVF can no longer be practiced...


It seems so patently un-pro-life to me to allow embryos to be destroyed, rather than allowing research which might help other people. Isuspect most of the people making these laws have never experienced infertility, IVF, or tried to adopt,and thus have no understanding of the issues involved, or how these processes actually work.
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