ABC news has a video re: egg donors capped prices and a lawsuit

ABC news has a video re: egg donors capped prices and a lawsuit

Joined: September 26th, 2008, 9:06 pm

July 28th, 2015, 4:43 pm #1

dang. Tried to post it. You'll have to look it up.

Last edited by thesameboat on July 28th, 2015, 4:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 26th, 2008, 9:06 pm

July 28th, 2015, 5:07 pm #2

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 26th, 2008, 9:06 pm

July 28th, 2015, 5:08 pm #3

I swear I am sober.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 13th, 2008, 5:13 pm

July 28th, 2015, 8:37 pm #4

"I swear I am sober."

Yeah, like we care. Anyway, as usual, there is the frustration of news outlets going into exquisite detail about the process and the risks without mentioning that, for the most part, this is the same process that all women undergoing IVF with their own eggs experience. When.will.they.stop.that? What surprised me is that there doesn't seem to be any mention of the fact that these compensation rates have not be altered, to my knowledge, to take inflation into account. When were those rates established? You know, this is not supposed to be a free market process, which is what some donors want it to be. If there is a shortage of donors at current compensation rates, then the clinics will be pounding at SART and ASRM's doors to get those levels increased.

But I also don't think those rates are observed when agency donors are involved. Others will surely have more information. You know, the image of desperate women selling their eggs to recipients to the highest price, risking their health to do it, is pretty absurd. If a woman isn't healthy enough to donate, she'll be excluded by the clinic. If what they mean is women taking the ordinary health risks of donation, well, then those risks are fairly small. No one is forcing anyone to donate their oocytes (well, that we know of). I don't think the plaintiffs are going to succeed, because I think these compensation standards are voluntary, and I think they are also widely not observed with agency donors, at least.

Maggie (in VA)
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 18th, 2015, 12:27 am

July 28th, 2015, 10:11 pm #5

dang. Tried to post it. You'll have to look it up.
Is there an article about it? I just don't like watching videos.

Anyway, if they are suing because they don't like the pay they were offered, they won't succeed. Unless they were told they would be paid more, and then were paid less.
Last edited by De22 on July 28th, 2015, 10:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 26th, 2008, 9:06 pm

July 29th, 2015, 8:25 am #6

Recommendations are currently that a maximum compensation of $5000 be paid. These donors think that's unfair since there's no cap on what clinics can charge.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 26th, 2008, 9:06 pm

July 29th, 2015, 8:26 am #7

"I swear I am sober."

Yeah, like we care. Anyway, as usual, there is the frustration of news outlets going into exquisite detail about the process and the risks without mentioning that, for the most part, this is the same process that all women undergoing IVF with their own eggs experience. When.will.they.stop.that? What surprised me is that there doesn't seem to be any mention of the fact that these compensation rates have not be altered, to my knowledge, to take inflation into account. When were those rates established? You know, this is not supposed to be a free market process, which is what some donors want it to be. If there is a shortage of donors at current compensation rates, then the clinics will be pounding at SART and ASRM's doors to get those levels increased.

But I also don't think those rates are observed when agency donors are involved. Others will surely have more information. You know, the image of desperate women selling their eggs to recipients to the highest price, risking their health to do it, is pretty absurd. If a woman isn't healthy enough to donate, she'll be excluded by the clinic. If what they mean is women taking the ordinary health risks of donation, well, then those risks are fairly small. No one is forcing anyone to donate their oocytes (well, that we know of). I don't think the plaintiffs are going to succeed, because I think these compensation standards are voluntary, and I think they are also widely not observed with agency donors, at least.

Maggie (in VA)
I am always annoyed when I hear about the 'dangers' since they're never mentioned with regards to OE IVF.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 26th, 2008, 9:06 pm

July 29th, 2015, 10:27 am #8

dang. Tried to post it. You'll have to look it up.
An egg donor almost DIES in that one. And the unethical clinic didn't seek medical attention for her. Seriously. It's awful the negative angle in the press all the time, and the unfair fiction spins.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 13th, 2008, 5:13 pm

July 29th, 2015, 1:49 pm #9

Lie to Me was my favorite broadcast TV show at the time. Yes, the whole story line around egg donors was preposterous, but bear in mind that the donor almost dies because the doctor doing the procedure wasn't a legitimate physician, right? Worse, to me, was The Black List episode in which a master criminal kidnaps? coerces? can't remember -- young women to become surrogates, who are then placed into a medically induced coma to gestate the baby. He has this whole high tech lab for performing this in a tony D.C. office building, and all the babies are his own children. Or were they his clones? Anyway, it was so ridiculous. All a master criminal would need to do IRL is hire surrogates, probably overseas, and do the procedure as per usual, which would be far cheaper than this extravagant lab, and all the risk of kidnapping young women to do it. Well, unless it was the cloning scenario. But writers can depict almost anything they want about ART, and most of the public will just lap it up, because they don't know any better. Take care, Maggie (in VA)
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 26th, 2008, 9:06 pm

July 29th, 2015, 6:33 pm #10

And it made me realize I didn't react as much to the Lie to Me episode about surrogacy. (Surrogates were kept almost like slaves in that one)
I reckon if I were running a reputable clinic in Mexico, the fact that they were portrayed so negatively is what would have hit me.
Quote
Like
Share