Monte
Monte

May 19th, 2017, 9:03 pm #11

Thanks Star that helps, I think I will do the test just to see what it comes back with, will be kind of interesting. After that I will have to start digging on my own and see what I come up with.
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Jankauskas
Jankauskas

May 20th, 2017, 12:14 pm #12

Guys, my husband does a LOT of genealogy work, has done so for years. He is a big fan of Ancestry.com and of their DNA testing. He recommends it to many people asking similar questions. His ancestry is Scots/Scots-Irish/German. From his experience, no DNA testing will tell you more than Eastern European when it comes to those countries-they will link you to others researching a similar resultant group. My husband is really into the Scottish heritage and helps at many festivals in our area-he has been extremely helpful to those starting out. He has very mixed feelings about using other recently advertised DNA testing. Claims are a little too specific in their ads. You might be of Nordic ancestry but that doesn't pinpoint you to a specific country and you might share some traits but remember our varied American backgrounds. Same with Eastern Europeans. That helps you to narrow down the search but you've got to put in your own muscle after that. And also, remember, they do point you in the direction of others searching similar lines. Hope this helps! Star
Star & Monte, I too have been very involved in genealogy. I was not trying to disparage Ancestry.com. My intent in regard to Ancestry DNA testing was to point out that it does not identify a specific country. To wit: Per Ancestry.com: "Eastern European" encompasses the following: Poland, Slovenia, Austria, Russia, Hungary, Slovenia, Romania, Serbia, Ukraine, Belarus, Muldova, Lithuania, Latvia, Bosnia- Herzogovenia, Croatia. I have been a member of Ancestry for 12 years now and find it to be extremely useful in genealogical research. Best regards, Carl J
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vancevisuals
vancevisuals

May 21st, 2017, 11:52 am #13

Looked Over your list of Eastern European countries.
My wife is of Czechoslovakian descent.
Surprized it isn't considered Eastern European
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Jankauskas
Jankauskas

May 21st, 2017, 4:44 pm #14

Monte, My mistake. The Czech Republic IS one of the "Eastern European Countries" per Ancestry.com. Carl J
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Jankauskas
Jankauskas

May 22nd, 2017, 11:50 am #15

I am looking for anyone that has info on my grandfather, his name was Victor Vischulis and any info on his family. I have lost the emails that had alot of info about him. They we from the Chicago area.

Thanks
Monte, It seems that "Victor" also used the name Vitant (probably Vytautas) and Hendrick. On his WWI Draft Card he lists his name as Vitant Hendick Vischules born 1898 (no month or day listed) living at 4537 S Wood St. Chicago, Ill. Nearest relative father: Vincent.
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Monte
Monte

May 22nd, 2017, 1:22 pm #16

I was connected with a Don Vischulis on this site and his family had an extensive tree with those name but I lost contact with him so I'm trying to start over again.
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Gee Jay
Gee Jay

May 28th, 2017, 7:27 am #17

Monte, I did the Ancestry DNA test. I wasn't very specific. My Lithuanian ancestry was identified as "Eastern European". I don't have any recommendation. Perhaps someone on this site may have one. Carl J
I ordered DNA tests from Family Tree DNA. I used them because I feel their privacy statement is the strongest, and because their tests are more extensive than Ancestry or 23andMe. There are some other testing companies that are less well known.

I don't have my results yet and am waiting impatiently.

I'm not at all interested in learning what my ethnic makeup is. Two of my grandparents got off the boat from Lithuania, and on the other side of the family three great-grandparents got off the boat from Germany. That leaves only one great-grandparent and her ancestry has been thoroughly traced. So I know my ethnic makeup (unless there was what genetic genealogists call a "non paternal event").

There are basically three kinds of DNA results. One is Y DNA, for which only men can be tested. Your Y DNA tells who your father's father's father (etc) was. The Y DNA is passed intact from great grandfather to grandfather to father to son.

The second type is mt (mitochondrial) DNA. Both men and women can be tested for mt DNA, but it is passed from mother to child. So it will tell who your mother's mother's mother (etc) was. Both sons and daughters inherit their mt DNA from their mothers, but men do not pass it to their children.

The third type is au (autosomal) DNA. Everyone gets a mixture of au DNA from both their parents. Siblings will not have the same autosomal DNA, though it will probably be similar.

All the types of DNA can be used to determine how you are related to another person. Y DNA and mt DNA can tell you who your parents are (and your father's father, and your mother's mother), but au DNA can tell you about other relationships.

Since I don't have my results back yet I'm still not certain what I will learn. It depends somewhat on whether there are other individuals in my ancestral tree who have been tested as well.

Many men are extremely interested in their Y DNA because it is "surname" DNA. In theory, everyone with your Y DNA should have the same surname as you. However, in practice you do not all have the same surname, because when the mutation occurred that created your Y DNA, surnames were not yet in use.

I joined the "Baltic Sea Project" on the Family Tree DNA (FTDNA) web site. Right now some of the people are a little excited because a new member seems to be descended from "Gedymin," by which I assume they mean the Grand Duke. I think I know why they believe that, but I'm going to wait to try to figure out more when I have my own results and can do my studying on my results rather than someone else's.

However, my ancestors were peasants so I don't think I am descended from nobility. I'm not sure what my DNA testing will teach me but I'm sure it will be interesting in some way.

NOTE ABOUT ANCESTRY DNA RESULTS: If you have your results, it's a very good idea to load them into GEDMatch. As far as I know, Ancestry doesn't provide you with the tools to do much genealogical investigation with the results you get from them, but GEDMatch does. I can't help you with the use of GEDMatch because I don't yet have results to load into it, but there are a lot of user groups with helpful people.

Genetic genealogy is a whole world beyond regular genealogy and it's very interesting.

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Star Lakavage
Star Lakavage

May 28th, 2017, 4:16 pm #18

Gee Jay-again, I'll preface what I know on DNA testing thru Family Tree and Ancestry. My husband has gone thru both the Y and the mitochondrial. Again, his background is mainly Scottish/Irish with a little German scattered in there. He has helped a number of people thru their searching. The Family Tree DNA will give you generalities (like Eastern European, Scottish/Irish) but the best part in his opinion is pointing you to others who are searching for either a similar family name or group. This can either help confirm your own research or give you other leads to those who can help. Think of the results as either a pointer or additional guidance for your search.

The pointers can be a huge help-most of us in this forum have solid proof of where our families came from (at least as far as country) but the biggest brick wall is the variations on name spellings. I finally found some basic information on my Grandmother and her first husband under one of the most contorted spellings of the last name that I have found to date. In cases like this, the pointer to someone researching a similar group can be a huge help.

My husband had a gentleman call him several years ago. This person told my husband that he had gone thru the Family Tree testing and it lead him to my husband who was researching similar names/family groups. With some help, they both came to the conclusion that in a distant connection, they were both related but apparently there was a slight parental surprise for the man who contacted my husband. As many dyed in the wool Southerners will tell you, "If you don't think there's a Yankee in the wood pile, you're either lying or fooling yourself!" Good Luck!
Star

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vancevisuals
vancevisuals

May 28th, 2017, 5:36 pm #19

That was my thinking with the surname variations as every, without exception, census, marriage, birth, death reports prior to 1940 when my grandfather settled into a surname spelling (which was different from his siblings) has different spellings, variations etc.
I have an idea, also, what my heritage is or where it originates but not my where my family tree originates.
so while DNA testing may give me a few surprises, it isn't helping with my family tree in all probability, or would it?
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Gee Jay
Gee Jay

May 28th, 2017, 6:08 pm #20

"so while DNA testing may give me a few surprises, it isn't helping with my family tree in all probability, or would it?"

It might, and it might not. It's not a substitute for the kind of research we're all doing, but it could supplement it. Someday there may be enough people who've had their DNA tested that it will be possible to simply plug yourself into a giant worldwide family tree. But what will be the fun in that?

Star explains, above, how her husband has found it useful. In some ways it's a bit like those little green leaves in Ancestry.com. None of those leads are a sure thing -- they all have to be investigated -- but they might lead somewhere useful.

And even if you don't find it helpful in your genealogy research, I'm certain you'll find it interesting. It's a whole different area of genealogy work.
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