Jankauskas
Jankauskas

April 7th, 2017, 10:44 am #11

1920 Census Brooklyn NY: Martin Sinkvich 54, wife Mary 46, sons Martin Jr 18 and Charles 15, daughter Margaret 10. Martin & Mary state that they came to the USA in 1905, that they are Russian, and their native tongue is "LITHUANIAN". The children were born in New York. Martin's occupation was a tailor. Martin "Zinkavich" age 68 died 2 Oct 1945 in Kings CO NY Cert# 19179. Mary "Sinkevich" age 56 died 22 May 1928 in Kings CO NY Cert# 18428. MY guess is their Lithuanian surname was Sinkevicius and/or Zinkevicius. Carl J
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April 7th, 2017, 3:42 pm #12

Wow Carl I really appriciate the research you did.
The mystery remains somewhat, but I am comefortable keeping my Lithuain heritage.
Going to take those surnames and try and further the search.

Thank Again;

Fred
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Gee Jay
Gee Jay

April 7th, 2017, 3:52 pm #13

Thanks for the support.
I guess that would be my next step
The fact that I have very vague starting points concerns me that I won't get very far.

Fred Vance
With some luck, persistence, and ingenuity you might be very happy with what you're able to learn.

Here's what I would do if I were you. I'm assuming you are a subscriber to Ancestry.com. If not, do subscribe. (You really don't need the international version -- there's little or no info from Lithuania on Ancestry.)

1) Try to get actual copies of Martin and Mary's death certificates. (There will be a charge.) The one who died first (Mary) is probably the best, as it should contain information provided by the survivor. That might tell the city they were from. The city name could be unrecognizable, but it might at least give you the first few letters of the name and you can search from there.

2) Try to find their names on a passenger list. Jankauskas found that they arrived in 1905, and while that could be off by a year or two, it seems that people usually told the truth to the census-taker about the year they arrived. (But they often lied about their birth dates, especially as they got older!!) The passenger list might give the name of the city they're from. They almost certainly took the Hamburg to NYC route.

3) Try to find them on the 1910 census, because that's where they will have been most truthful about the years in which they were born. Compare what you find on the various censuses, to the death certificates. Probably the month and day of their birth will be correct on the death certificate, but again the year might be a fib.

4) Take a guess at the city they came from, using the info from the passenger list and the death certificates. I'd bet on Kėdáiniai, as I said in an earlier post. But if what you find doesn't look like it's even close to Kėdáiniai, look at the very bottom of this page under "Kaunas County": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C4%97dainiai and see if what you find looks a little like any of those places.

5) Armed with that info, contact the Lithuanian State Historical Archives http://www.archyvai.lt/en/archives/hist ... hives.html, give them the names, dates, and places you found. Ask them to search records for individuals who might match your ancestors in the area you mention.

They should write back and they should either give you a quote for the search, or they should let you know what they found and what they will charge you to provide the records. I expect the search will cost $100-200.

Good luck.

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April 7th, 2017, 5:50 pm #14

Yeah it's not so mush as dicouraged as frustrated, baffled and confused.
Should have figured it would be that way to some degree but not this much.
For example, there is no doubt that my greatgrandparents were born i Europe (probably Russia). all indications are that they arrived in 1905. Yet my grandfather, listed as being born in New York City, was born in 1901 0r 1902. Was he REALLY born in this country or not. Do not really know.
I will continue and use the information I've collected from you and Carl J.
It's a recent curiosty and a little late to ask anyone for clues as my father, aunt and uncles are all gone and my cousins know about as much as I do (or less now).
My father changed HIS name to Vance when we transplanted to Long Island which further complicates things in this country as I think My grandfathers siblings may have taken the spelling of the family name in different directions.
Rambling again, just wanted to say I DO appriciate the support of this web site.
Glad I found it.
Will keep you updated as I get new information if anyone is curious.

Fred Vance
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Gee Jay
Gee Jay

April 7th, 2017, 11:14 pm #15

Since I'm supposed to be painting a bathroom today, I decided to play around with your genealogy. Mary's family name was Bužonas, and Martin and Mary apparently entered the US in 1890 or 91. Mary, and probably Martin, was from a tiny village called Gluosninkai in Alytus County.

I know you are very concerned about whether they were "from" Russia or "from" Lithuania. Perhaps this map will clarify the reason for you that a question such as that is really not relevant. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Atla ... iory_3.png

Basically the borders were extremely fluid. You might wake up one day and find yourself under Russian rule, though you went to bed last night living in part of Poland or Lithuania. It's far more relevant to know what town/village one came from.




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April 8th, 2017, 12:24 am #16

it's funny you mention that
I found a 1930 census report (name pronounced Zinkavice this time.
All names and dates are correct yey on this report my great grandparent state they were born in lithuania and immagration date was 1890.
so it fits
i guess the borders were changing here in america too.
There was probably a reason for this like you said, and i've seen on some of these census report, they lumped Russia, polish, lithuanian and others all as Russian or Russian/Poles.
Could have been they way they catagorized maybe.
At least, at this point, I'm 99% sure my heritage is Lithuanian.
You don't live in Russia (if that's were they lived) and speak the Lithuanian language if your Russian.
So that sealed it for me.
Nothing against the Russian heritage but I'm happy to still be Lithuanian confirmed.
As i'm rehabinf from shoulder surgery, I still have some free time to continue this research.
Thanks for all your help!

Fred
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Jankauskas
Jankauskas

April 8th, 2017, 2:51 am #17

Wow Carl I really appriciate the research you did.
The mystery remains somewhat, but I am comefortable keeping my Lithuain heritage.
Going to take those surnames and try and further the search.

Thank Again;

Fred
Fred 1910 Census Brooklyn New York Montnes (sic) Zewkevitiekus 42, wife Mary 37, Daughter Cassie 17, sons, Tony 9, Charles 5, daughter. Maggie 0. John Bosine Bro-in-law 22. Martin and Mary are Russian-Lithuanian and came to the USA in 1890. All children born in New York. Martin is a cutter in mens clothing. Mary had 8 children - 4 are still alive.You'll also find this family in the 1900 census of Brooklyn, NY under the surname "Zinkaskie". Carl J
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April 8th, 2017, 2:01 pm #18

Thanks Carl,
Just took a look at these cenus reports
One question though; you say "Mary" had 8 children 4 are still alive did you mean "Maggie"
perhaps as I have found her death notice and I know my grandfather Tony/Martin passed around the time I was born.
Perhaps alive at the time.
If you could clarify how you know this I would greatly appriciate it.
Thanks for all your help
Fred
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Jankauskas
Jankauskas

April 8th, 2017, 3:13 pm #19

Fred, One of the questions on the 1910 census was for the mother to state how many children she has had and how may are still alive at this time (1910). Mary had 8 children and four of them are deceased, four are still alive. Carl J
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April 8th, 2017, 3:49 pm #20

That makes sense
thanks Carl
with all this info and my spell DIFFERENT every time it shows up, things get confusing

Fred
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