Resource re mining accidents PA

Resource re mining accidents PA

MST
MST

July 24th, 2011, 3:30 pm #1

http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/dam/rg/ ... 4_1932.pdf

The above link to mining accidents in PA. It gives some useful information such as nationality, age, date of accident, mine, mine company, nationalised or alien and whether the accident was fatal or non fatal.

I found a person on the site that I had been researching and they are classed as a citizen so I know that they were nationalised at the date of the accident.
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Juozas
Juozas

July 25th, 2011, 1:11 pm #2

I am wondering how I could find info on the list whose name begins with V ( Vaicenavicius ).

Juozas
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MST
MST

July 25th, 2011, 1:13 pm #3

http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/dam/rg/ ... 4_1932.pdf

The above link to mining accidents in PA. It gives some useful information such as nationality, age, date of accident, mine, mine company, nationalised or alien and whether the accident was fatal or non fatal.

I found a person on the site that I had been researching and they are classed as a citizen so I know that they were nationalised at the date of the accident.
May I suggest that the site mentioned in my post above is added to the databanks under PA.

Sometimes when a site is mentioned on a post after a few weeks it falls off the radar and this is a particularly useful site.

Thanks

Maureen
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MST
MST

July 25th, 2011, 1:15 pm #4

I am wondering how I could find info on the list whose name begins with V ( Vaicenavicius ).

Juozas
Juozas,

I cannot seem to find the home page but if you change the letter of the URL it works.

Regards

Maureen
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MST
MST

July 25th, 2011, 1:17 pm #5

I am wondering how I could find info on the list whose name begins with V ( Vaicenavicius ).

Juozas
http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/dam/rg/ ... 4_1932.pdf

That should work
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John Peters
John Peters

July 25th, 2011, 1:51 pm #6

May I suggest that the site mentioned in my post above is added to the databanks under PA.

Sometimes when a site is mentioned on a post after a few weeks it falls off the radar and this is a particularly useful site.

Thanks

Maureen
Maureen,

Thanks for the link to this very valuable resource.

Here is the main link to these records, organized by area (eastern - anthracite coal- and western - bituminous coal) PA and then by the name of a person arranged alphabetically by surname.

The information contained within each report changed over time, with a few additional columns of data included in the later reports, as the volume of accidents diminished. Topics covered in both the early and later reports include: name of the inspector, name of mine, operator of the mine, name of the injured miner, mine district number, date of the accident, cause of accident, county in which the accident occurred, whether fatal, whether the accident occurred inside or outside the mine, citizenship status, nationality, job classification, marital status, and the number of children.

Click on a "District" and range of years and then you'll see a list of links organized by letter of the alphabet -- the accidents are listed by the surname of the miner involved.

http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/dam/rg/ ... erface.htm

The records are in PDF format (unfortunately) and each alphabetic group is quite large, so you have to magnify the pages and scroll

You can also use the "Search Archives finding aids" box to enter a location, which will bring up all the records the Archives have online regarding that location whether mining-related or not!

Here is the link to the complete list of records from the PA Archives available online:

http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/dam/rg/

I will be forwarding this information to Richard Gostautas who is the site administrator.

John Peters
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MST
MST

July 25th, 2011, 2:24 pm #7

Thanks John,

It must have been like hell working in those anthracite mines after living on the land.

Regards

Maureen
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Juozas
Juozas

July 27th, 2011, 12:42 pm #8

As always, thank you for your help. I am amazed to see the large number of Lithuanians that were maimed and killed in mining accidents. My uncle lost his arm in a mining explosion , but I could not find his name on the list. Thanks again.
Juozas
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Tom S.
Tom S.

July 29th, 2011, 6:23 pm #9

Thanks John,

It must have been like hell working in those anthracite mines after living on the land.

Regards

Maureen
Maureen,

Last year I attended the 96th Annual Lithuanian Festival in Frackville, Pennsylvania. One of the nearby towns had a coal mining museum where you could actually go inside a former working coal mine.

I took the tour and was surprised to see just how bad working conditions really were. I found two relatives in the list of coal mining accidents that John provided the URL for.

I found a 1930s vintage news article about another ancestor (Charles Klokis nee Kliokys)who was working in a coal mine when there was a cave-in at the opening of the mine. He and the other miners were totally unaware of it. As they were returning to the mine opening to leave at the end of the day, they encountered the "rescue party" that had cleared the opening of the mine and were proceeding deeper into the mine when they found Charles and the others.

Tom S.
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