Information on Lithuanian Family - Batter (name change)

Information on Lithuanian Family - Batter (name change)

Misty
Misty

April 16th, 2010, 2:33 pm #1

Hello fellow researchers,

Looking to make connections with anyone else that maybe looking into this family. I would like to find family that may still be in Lithuania. Long history in our family and to some of us seems secretive!

The farthest back we can find is a PETER BATTER. I have looked everywhere trying to find when he immigrated and what family he left behind. What I do know is that he said at some point that he was born on a farm near Kaunas, Lithuania (on documents I have, naturalization records in Canada, he states his birthdate as either 1859, 1862 or 1864, why the differences, I don't know). He left home for England to avoid conscription into the Russian Army when he was 17, and stayed there for about a year and then went to Cleveland, Ohio. He only stayed a short time and then went to Canada to work on the Railroad for the rest of his life.

He went back to Cleveland in 1887 to "find him a wife as he put it". He married Magdalena Rackwitz (name change too!) at St. Stanislaus Church on Feb 26 1888. On this document, Peter spells his name BATOSZJITIS, age 24 son of IGNATIUS and PETROVA BATOSZJITIS. Service was performed by a Father Francis Kolaszewski and family folk lore is that he was either a cousin, or at least from the same village in Lithuania.

Peter's brother Anton and sister Ona also came to Canada to work on the railroad around 1891. Peter stated that he left at least one brother and sister in Lithuania.

On the naturalization record from Canada, he states that he was born at Wajtysky, Wladyslawow, Lithuania on Feb 2 1859 and that he was a citizen of Russia. His parents were stated to be citizens or subjects of Lithuania.

I know names change, and I know that depending on where they came in, most of the spellings were phonetic. He couldn't read or write, but could speak 11 languages apparently. The phonetic spellings he gave the family were:

BALTRASHAVITCH, BALTRISHIS, BALTRUSUS, BALTUSAITIS - as I said, I believe these are all phonetic.

If there is anyone out there who may be connected to this family, say someone who knows they left, and with the name change lost that line, please help, maybe we are related.
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Paul Lucas
Paul Lucas

April 16th, 2010, 3:55 pm #2

Wladyslawow is the Polish name for Kudirkos Naumiestis. You can find it on this old map from 1932.

Wajtysky may be Wojtyszki which is to the north-east of Wladyslawow. On the modern day map (www.maps.lt)there does not seem to be a house or hamlet in the same place as on the old map.

www.mapywig.org/m/wig300k/36_SUWALKI-KOWNO_1932.jpg
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Marie
Marie

April 16th, 2010, 4:46 pm #3

Hello fellow researchers,

Looking to make connections with anyone else that maybe looking into this family. I would like to find family that may still be in Lithuania. Long history in our family and to some of us seems secretive!

The farthest back we can find is a PETER BATTER. I have looked everywhere trying to find when he immigrated and what family he left behind. What I do know is that he said at some point that he was born on a farm near Kaunas, Lithuania (on documents I have, naturalization records in Canada, he states his birthdate as either 1859, 1862 or 1864, why the differences, I don't know). He left home for England to avoid conscription into the Russian Army when he was 17, and stayed there for about a year and then went to Cleveland, Ohio. He only stayed a short time and then went to Canada to work on the Railroad for the rest of his life.

He went back to Cleveland in 1887 to "find him a wife as he put it". He married Magdalena Rackwitz (name change too!) at St. Stanislaus Church on Feb 26 1888. On this document, Peter spells his name BATOSZJITIS, age 24 son of IGNATIUS and PETROVA BATOSZJITIS. Service was performed by a Father Francis Kolaszewski and family folk lore is that he was either a cousin, or at least from the same village in Lithuania.

Peter's brother Anton and sister Ona also came to Canada to work on the railroad around 1891. Peter stated that he left at least one brother and sister in Lithuania.

On the naturalization record from Canada, he states that he was born at Wajtysky, Wladyslawow, Lithuania on Feb 2 1859 and that he was a citizen of Russia. His parents were stated to be citizens or subjects of Lithuania.

I know names change, and I know that depending on where they came in, most of the spellings were phonetic. He couldn't read or write, but could speak 11 languages apparently. The phonetic spellings he gave the family were:

BALTRASHAVITCH, BALTRISHIS, BALTRUSUS, BALTUSAITIS - as I said, I believe these are all phonetic.

If there is anyone out there who may be connected to this family, say someone who knows they left, and with the name change lost that line, please help, maybe we are related.
You can view the 1900 Cleveland directory at this link

http://www.census-online.com/links/

It has several names with the Kolaszewski spellings, and the Rev. pastor Anton F. of the Church of the Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Not sure this will help much.
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Tom S.
Tom S.

April 17th, 2010, 1:17 am #4

Wladyslawow is the Polish name for Kudirkos Naumiestis. You can find it on this old map from 1932.

Wajtysky may be Wojtyszki which is to the north-east of Wladyslawow. On the modern day map (www.maps.lt)there does not seem to be a house or hamlet in the same place as on the old map.

www.mapywig.org/m/wig300k/36_SUWALKI-KOWNO_1932.jpg
I checked my road atlas which is the same as www.maps.lt and found nothing there. A nearby village called KRYKLE that was on the 1932 map is also missing from the current day map.

The village of Tarpuc^iai (population 68 in 2001) is new and didn't appear on the 1932 map. It is about 2 kilometers west of where Wojtyszki was and on the same road.

It looks like a number of drainage canals were put in where your missing village use to be.

Tom S.
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Misty
Misty

April 17th, 2010, 11:45 am #5

Wladyslawow is the Polish name for Kudirkos Naumiestis. You can find it on this old map from 1932.

Wajtysky may be Wojtyszki which is to the north-east of Wladyslawow. On the modern day map (www.maps.lt)there does not seem to be a house or hamlet in the same place as on the old map.

www.mapywig.org/m/wig300k/36_SUWALKI-KOWNO_1932.jpg
Thank you for the information on the village. I had looked at a few old maps to find the areas, just don't understand why the differences in where he stated he was from. I know that there was a lot of turmoil at the time that he left and that makes sense as to why on various censuses he states, Polish or Russian. He does mention that he speaks Lithuanian on a census, I thought that was interesting.

So, if there is anyone out there that has these people on their tree or know of cemetaries that family members may be at, I'd really like to find out what happened, why some left, why some stayed, why the name change, what was the name. I really hope to be able to solve this mystery.
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Tom S.
Tom S.

April 18th, 2010, 3:19 am #6

Misty,

If you know the history of the region, the information you found makes sense.

Neither Poland nor Lithuania existed as independent states from 1795 to 1918 because they were occupied by Russia. My grandfather was born 15 kilometers south of the village you were asking about.

He was 100% Lithuanian but had a Russian passport and was listed as a Russian when he emigrated to the U.S. in 1911. During the Russian occupation, Lithuania was divided into 4 provinces (gubernia in Russian).

Your province was Suwalki/Suvalkija which was one of the 10 provinces that comprised Congress Poland (sometimes know as Russia Poland). The other 9 provinces were Polish ones.

What language was spoken at home (per the census) is more meaningful than what nationality was recorded for them at a certain time.

A good friend of mine tried to fill out some paperwork that asked what country his father was born in. His father was born in Lvov which was part of Austria Hungary at his birth. As a young man, the city was part of Poland. Now in current times, it is part of Ukraine.

Understanding the history helps explain what sometime appear to be contradictory answers.

Hope this helps.

Tom S.
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Vincas
Vincas

April 19th, 2010, 10:55 am #7

Thank you for the information on the village. I had looked at a few old maps to find the areas, just don't understand why the differences in where he stated he was from. I know that there was a lot of turmoil at the time that he left and that makes sense as to why on various censuses he states, Polish or Russian. He does mention that he speaks Lithuanian on a census, I thought that was interesting.

So, if there is anyone out there that has these people on their tree or know of cemetaries that family members may be at, I'd really like to find out what happened, why some left, why some stayed, why the name change, what was the name. I really hope to be able to solve this mystery.
Village Vaitishkiai ( Vaitikiai ) now is listed in Kudirkos Naumiestis parish apr 6 km, Sakiai distr. Antanas Baltrusaitis ( b.1865-d.1949 ) use to live in Kudirkos Naumiestis around 1885. He was famous Lithuanian Book smuggler. I don't think he could be your Peter's brother Anton just want to say Baltrusaitis surname is still lives around Kudirkos Naumiestis and in Sakiai disrt. as well.
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Tom S.
Tom S.

April 19th, 2010, 3:10 pm #8

I checked the Lithuanian Wikipedia and it listed two different people named Antanas Baltrus^aitis who were born in the same general area. Both were Book Smugglers.

The first one (1865-1949) eventually left Lithuania in 1944 and settled in Germany where he died in 1949.

The second one (1883-1970) emigrated to the U.S. and settled in Shenandoah PA. He returned to Lithuania in 1921 and died 1970 in Kaunas.

#1 - Antanas Baltruðaitis-Antanëlis (1865 m. birþelio 10 d. Papartynuose, Ðakiø valsèius, dab. Ðakiø raj. 1949 m. gruodþio 15 d. Biberache, Vokietija (Germany)
http://lt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antanas_Ba ... n%C4%97lis


#2 Antanas Baltruðaitis (g. 1883 m. geguþës 28 d. Buktiðkiuose, Ðakiø raj. - 1970 m. Kaune) knygneðys, Lietuvos ir JAV (USA) spaudos darbuotojas.

He had brothers, Andrius and Juozas Baltrus^aitis.

http://lt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antanas_Baltru%C5%A1aitis

Hope this helps.

Tom S.
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Misty
Misty

April 20th, 2010, 2:12 pm #9

Thank you all for your information and help. I'm not sure if these two are in the tree. My Anton was born approx 1876 and left Lithuania for Canada with his sister Ona (Annie) and settled in the Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, Canada area where he died.

I will keep looking and I really appreciate all the responses. One never knows what connection you can make. I will definately look at the names given.

Thanks and anything else, I check regularly!
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John Peters
John Peters

April 20th, 2010, 5:50 pm #10

Hello fellow researchers,

Looking to make connections with anyone else that maybe looking into this family. I would like to find family that may still be in Lithuania. Long history in our family and to some of us seems secretive!

The farthest back we can find is a PETER BATTER. I have looked everywhere trying to find when he immigrated and what family he left behind. What I do know is that he said at some point that he was born on a farm near Kaunas, Lithuania (on documents I have, naturalization records in Canada, he states his birthdate as either 1859, 1862 or 1864, why the differences, I don't know). He left home for England to avoid conscription into the Russian Army when he was 17, and stayed there for about a year and then went to Cleveland, Ohio. He only stayed a short time and then went to Canada to work on the Railroad for the rest of his life.

He went back to Cleveland in 1887 to "find him a wife as he put it". He married Magdalena Rackwitz (name change too!) at St. Stanislaus Church on Feb 26 1888. On this document, Peter spells his name BATOSZJITIS, age 24 son of IGNATIUS and PETROVA BATOSZJITIS. Service was performed by a Father Francis Kolaszewski and family folk lore is that he was either a cousin, or at least from the same village in Lithuania.

Peter's brother Anton and sister Ona also came to Canada to work on the railroad around 1891. Peter stated that he left at least one brother and sister in Lithuania.

On the naturalization record from Canada, he states that he was born at Wajtysky, Wladyslawow, Lithuania on Feb 2 1859 and that he was a citizen of Russia. His parents were stated to be citizens or subjects of Lithuania.

I know names change, and I know that depending on where they came in, most of the spellings were phonetic. He couldn't read or write, but could speak 11 languages apparently. The phonetic spellings he gave the family were:

BALTRASHAVITCH, BALTRISHIS, BALTRUSUS, BALTUSAITIS - as I said, I believe these are all phonetic.

If there is anyone out there who may be connected to this family, say someone who knows they left, and with the name change lost that line, please help, maybe we are related.
Misty,

Just to cloud things up a bit more, there are also these possible spellings for what became "Batter", though if you have multiple spellings where the "-ltr-" appears in the name, these seem less likely than the name mentioned by others:

Batarunas or Batarunis
Batoraitis
Batizatis
Batrus^aitis

It seems to me that if his name were Baltrus^aitis, he would have changed it to something like Baltrus or Balter rather than Batter.

John Peters
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