Official reports, documents, statements, etc

No chat, just threads with links to 7th July media archives, images, official statements, reports and other research resources.

Official reports, documents, statements, etc

The Antagonist
Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

18 Dec 2006, 15:41 #1

Tony Blair's Statement to Parliament on 11 July 2005
Prime Ministers' update to MP's following the 7 July bombings
11 July 2005


The Prime Minister has updated MPs on the terror attacks on London.

Tony Blair spoke of his 'revulsion' at the terror attacks on London last week. He expressed his 'heartfelt thanks and admiration' for emergency services and transport workers

Read the statement in full: http://www.number10.gov.uk/output/Page7903.asp
Home Office Reports, starting with the 'narrative':
Government publishes official report on 7 July bombings
11 May 2006


The Government has published a report detailing the events on, and leading up to, the 7 July terrorist attacks.

The report summarises the discoveries the police, intelligence and security agencies have made so far, including:
  • </li>
  • what is known about those responsible
  • how and why they carried out the attacks
The report is not able to cover all the information, however, as it is essential not to prejudice the ongoing police investigations, prosecutions and intellegience techniques.

Read the Report of the Official Account of the Bombings in London on 7 July.

Home Office website
The Intelligence & Security Committee report and the government response to it: More from the Home Office:
Lessons learned from 7 July
22 September 2006


A new report finds that when the bombs exploded in London last year, there were incredible acts of bravery by the emergency services, volunteers, and members of the public - but there are still lessons to be learned.

The report, 'Addressing lessons from the emergency response to the 7 July 2005 London bombings', published today by Home Secretary John Reid, shows that the emergency services responded efficiently, and under very difficult conditions.&nbsp; But it also sets out a number of areas where more could have been done, and details changes that should be made.

In the year since the attacks, Dr. Reid and Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell have met with many of the families of the victims of the bombings and those who survived.&nbsp; Their experiences and concerns helped to shape the report.

Main findings
The main findings of the report are:
  • </li>
  • the response to the bombings demonstrated the strength and flexibility of the UK’s emergency response arrangements
  • officials need to share information and provide practical and emotional support to survivors and the families of those killed
  • reception and assistance centres must be established quickly
  • communications equipment used by emergency services must be improved
  • Incredible bravery
John Reid praised the emergency services who responded on that day, saying, 'There were some incredible acts of bravery, and there can be no doubt that many lives were saved thanks to the efforts of everyone involved in the response.'

He noted that the report found the initial response had been 'fast, professional and effective'.&nbsp; However, he added, 'In times of crisis, information and support must be readily available and easy to access for those who need it. Getting the right help in place is of critical importance and we are working hard to strengthen our emergency response.'

Tessa Jowell, Secretary of State for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport called 7 July 'a day of infamy and heroism'. She credited the emergency services and transport workers with taking 'enormous risks to save lives'.

Having met with many of those bereaved or injured on that day, she said, 'While they have differing experiences, it is clear that more could have been done to support all those who were caught up in the attacks - on the day and in the weeks and months that followed. I have been humbled by the courage and dignity of the bereaved families and those who survived the attacks. I am very grateful to them for sharing their experiences, and absolutely determined that we will apply the lessons learned so that we can do better in the future.'

Additional information
Along with the full report (new window), a separate London Regional Resilience Forum report (new window), also published today, summarises the main findings and lessons learned from the frontline response by London’s emergency services and the other key agencies involved.

Home Office website
Notes to editors for the above:
Notes to Editors

1. The report covers:

- Briefly what happened on the day
- Better support to the bereaved and survivors
- More resilient telecommunications networks
- Providing timely information to the public Keeping London moving safely; and,
- Crisis co-ordination arrangements

2. The report is available at&nbsp; http://security.homeoffice.gov.uk/news- ... ns-learned (new window)://http://security.homeoffice.gov.uk/n...ed (new window)://http://security.homeoffice.gov.uk/n...ed (new window); www.ukresilience.info (new window);&nbsp; www.pfe.gov.uk (new window); www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk (new window) and www.culture.gov.uk (new window)

3. The London Regional Resilience Forum report into 7/7 is available at www.londonprepared.gov.uk (new window)
Addressing lessons from the emergency response to the 7 July 2005 London bombings

Terrorists attacked London on 7 July 2005, claiming 52 innocent lives and injuring hundreds more. Many more people were affected by their experiences that day and in the days that followed. Questions have been asked of the Government about our preparation, response, and the support provided to survivors. This document looks at the main lessons we have identified from the multi-agency response to the bombings, either through our formal lessons learned process or as a result of having listened to many of those affected. It also describes progress made in addressing the lessons identified. We focus on significant issues relevant to the response to future emergencies across the UK that need to be tackled by central Government.

Date: Thu Sep 21 12:37:50 BST 2006

Full Document
Addressing lessons from the emergency response to the 7 July 2005 London bombings &#124; Download PDF file (1Mb)

Home Office website
The Greater London Assembly communications reports:
7 July Review Committee

The 7 July Review Committee (formally the London Resilience Committee) was set up by the London Assembly at its meeting on 8 September 2005 to review some of the lessons to be learned from the 7 July bomb attacks on London, focusing on the experience of ordinary Londoners caught up in the events, and paying particular attention to issues of communication.
Agendas, minutes and other papers for meetings of the GLA 7th July Review Committee can be accessed here.

The final report of the 7 July Review Committee was published in June 2006. You can download the three-volume final first report here or using the links below.
Report of the 7 July Review Committee

June 2006

Report of the 7 July Review Committee PDF
Report of the 7 July Review Committee RTF
Vol 2: Views & information from organisations PDF
Vol 2: Views & information from organisations RTF
Vol 3: Views & information from individuals PDF
Vol 3: Views & information from individuals RTF

The 7 July Review Committee was set up to examine the lessons to be learned from the response to the London bombings on 7 July, and in particular communications issues. It contains a detailed analysis of the response to the bombings. There is no doubting the courage and determination of many thousands of individuals who responded to the attacks on London on 7 July. But while the people involved performed outstandingly, the systems and equipment that were supposed to support them did not. Our report makes 54 recommendations designed to improve the way such major incidents, and the people caught up in them, are managed

Contact: Janet Hughes, email janet.hughes@london.gov.uk
University of Sussex psyop report hosted on the GLA web site:
Psychological responses to the July 7th 2005 London Bombings

We are a team of researchers at the University of Sussex looking at ways to ensure safe and orderly mass evacuations in emergency situations, which is funded by a grant from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), grant number RES-000-23-0446.&nbsp; We are also researching how people have coped since July 7th in order to advance the theory and treatment of conditions such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). What follows is a brief synopsis of our preliminary findings as well as our response to some of the points made in the GLA report into how the authorities responded to July 7th. Please contact us at the address below if you’d like to know more about the project. Also, if you have a story you are willing to share, we would be very grateful if you could visit the web-site that was set up for survivors and eyewitnesses to record their experiences:-

please go to: www.cs.nott.ac.uk/~dzs/londonbomb/index.htm

PDF
"The problem with always being a conformist is that when you try to change the system from within, it's not you who changes the system; it's the system that will eventually change you." -- Immortal Technique

"The media is the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power. Because they control the minds of the masses." -- Malcolm X

"The eternal fight is not many battles fought on one level, but one great battle fought on many different levels." -- The Antagonist

"Truth does not fear investigation." -- Unknown
Reply

Bridget
Joined: 26 Nov 2005, 01:46

30 Dec 2006, 02:18 #2

From Hansard 11/07/05:

Tony Blair's statement to the House of Commons 11/7/05: (Hansard)
I will now try to give the House as much information as I can; obviously, some of it is already well known. There were four explosions. Three took place on underground trains: one between Aldgate East and Liverpool Street; one between Russell Square and Kings Cross; one in a train at Edgware Road station. All of these took place within 50 seconds of each other, at 8.50 am. The other explosion was on the No. 30 bus at Upper Woburn place, at 9.47 a.m.
Baroness Amos' statement to the House of Lords 11/7/05: (Hansard)
I will now try to give the House as much information as I can. Some of it is obviously already well known. There were four explosions. Three took place on Underground trains—one between Aldgate East and Liverpool Street; one between Russell Square and King's Cross; one in a train at Edgware Road station. All of these took place within 50 seconds of each other at 8.50 am. The other explosion was on the No. 30 bus at Upper Woburn Place at 9.47 am.
�To those who are afraid of the truth, I wish to offer a few scary truths; and to those who are not afraid of the truth, I wish to offer proof that the terrorism of truth is the only one that can be of benefit to the proletariat.� -- On Terrorism and the State, Gianfranco Sanguinetti
Reply

Bridget
Joined: 26 Nov 2005, 01:46

15 Jan 2007, 00:31 #3

The days and weeks that followed involved every police officer,
every PCSO, every explosives sniffer dog and all other staff
working tirelessly to ensure the safety of the rail system. Mutual
aid was sought and offered by other police forces and high profile
patrols and pro-active stop and search operations were stepped
up considerably. Armed officers were routinely seen at stations
for the first time.

At the same time, some 130 BTP staff worked on the inquiry, led
by the Metropolitan Police’s Anti-Terrorist Branch, which rapidly
identified the four bombers and led to further arrests. An Incident
Room was set up at BTP’s Headquarters to manage Operation
Serpentine, BTP’s part of the inquiry, which included processing
many thousands of CCTV tapes and hard drives and led directly
to rapid identification of the bombers.


After 7 July, BTP re-focused its visible policing strategy to deter
and disrupt potential terrorist activity. Much of this takes place at
major interchange stations and prominent sites in the capital.
There has also been increased covert activity to spot possible
hostile reconnaissance as well as increased stop/search
operations and the creation of a Counter Terrorism Pro-active Unit.
BTP is also exploring new technology and looking at behaviour
assessment screening systems to identify suspicious behaviour.
Security on the rail system is very much a tri-partite operation.
Police are one important part of the equation, but there is also a
crucial role for rail staff and the public. Communities hold the key
to fighting modern international terrorism and BTP has put much
more effort into engaging with them since 7 July (see page 5).
At the end of November, the then Secretary of State for
Transport, Alistair Darling, announced an extra £3.6 million in
funding for additional costs associated with BTP in its response to
the July terrorist attacks.
BTP Annual Report 05/06
�To those who are afraid of the truth, I wish to offer a few scary truths; and to those who are not afraid of the truth, I wish to offer proof that the terrorism of truth is the only one that can be of benefit to the proletariat.� -- On Terrorism and the State, Gianfranco Sanguinetti
Reply

Sinclair
Joined: 24 Jan 2006, 22:57

27 Feb 2007, 14:23 #4

Just found this whilst researching:

From http://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?id ... #g14158.r0
Home Department
Terrorist Attack (London)

Written Answer 10 Oct 2005


Christopher Huhne (Eastleigh, Liberal Democrat) &#124; Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how long it took the emergency services to reach each of the underground trains attacked on 7 July; and how long it took to reach the bus that was attacked.

Charles Clarke (Home Secretary) &#124; Hansard source

The following table is drawn from information provided by the Metropolitan Police, London Fire Brigade and London Ambulance Service. The times given are those at which the control room was first notified and when the first crews were officially recorded as arriving at the locations to which they were mobilised. This may not have been the trains themselves as a number were deep underground. As three of the scenes were at stations, British Transport Police Officers were often already on the scene. Additionally many police officers who were near the scenes self deployed to assist.

Response times—7 July attacks&nbsp; Metropolitan/City of London Police London Ambulance Service London Fire Brigade
Notification Arrival Notification Arrival Notification Arrival
Aldgate Tube Station 08.51 08.59 08.51 09.03 08.56 09.00
Edgware Road Tube Station 09.08 09.22 09.02 09.09 08.58 09.04
Kings Cross/Russell Square Tube Station 08.56 09.07 09.04 09.14 09.02 09.07
Tavistock Square Bus 09.47 (59)— 09.48 09.58 09.47 (60)09.54

(59) Officers already on scene

(60) Approximately

Source:Theyworkforyou.com
See the original page for a formatted table.
In some ways she was far more acute than Winston, and far less susceptible to Party propaganda. Once when he happened in some connection to mention the war against Eurasia, she startled him by saying casually that in her opinion the war was not happening. The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the Government of Oceania itself, "just to keep the people frightened." -- George Orwell, 1984
Reply

Bridget
Joined: 26 Nov 2005, 01:46

27 Feb 2007, 14:52 #5

Cheers sinclair, as I'm currently working on putting together the Liverpool St/Aldgate page for the website it again confirms how Liverpool Street, which was reported as the site of the first explosion officially became known as Aldgate and fails to get mentioned in reports after 7th July.

I think the Edgware Road figures are way out as well, as the ambulance despatcher blog records 9.20 as the time of the first call. (Paddington police station being almost directly scross the road from Edgware Rd btw)
At about 0920, I took a call from a rather flustered sounding policewoman from Paddington police station.

“There’s been an incident at Edgware Road station!” she said.

“An explosion?” I said.

“How did you know?” she said, confused.
From someone close to the scene I have this:

Did you know the fleet of ambulances that attended the Edgware Road incident came from Surrey ambulance service. Or that they were actually directed by their incident room to attend the King Cross incident. It was pure chance they were passing Edgware Road and were then stopped by people in the street. No ambulances up to that point had been directed to Edgware Road. Yet official London underground records record the Edgware Road bomb as the first one.

There are many more such mistakes made at Edgware Road and the other sites that have gradually come to light. My hope is that such mistakes can never be made again
�To those who are afraid of the truth, I wish to offer a few scary truths; and to those who are not afraid of the truth, I wish to offer proof that the terrorism of truth is the only one that can be of benefit to the proletariat.� -- On Terrorism and the State, Gianfranco Sanguinetti
Reply

amirrortotheenemy
Joined: 06 Nov 2006, 17:39

13 Apr 2007, 00:12 #6

LONDON AMBULANCE SERVICE NHS TRUST
MEETING OF THE TRUST BOARD
Tuesday 26th July 2005 at 10am

http://www.lond-amb.nhs.uk/aboutus/trus ... 1Jul05.pdf
The situation remained confused for some time with ongoing reports of further explosions coupled with multiple sites as the injured emerged from several tube and railway stations. At one stage both the Met police and ourselves believed that we might be dealing with up to eight different scenes and we had to deploy management teams to all these sites until it became clear that there were in fact three explosions on tube trains and one on a bus.
"No one understood better than Stalin that the true object of propaganda is neither to convince nor even to persuade, but to produce a uniform pattern of public utterance in which the first trace of unorthodox thought immediately reveals itself as a jarring dissonance." Leonard Schapiro
Reply

amirrortotheenemy
Joined: 06 Nov 2006, 17:39

13 Apr 2007, 00:24 #7

LONDON AMBULANCE SERVICE NHS TRUST
MEETING OF THE TRUST BOARD
Tuesday 27th September 2005 at 10am

http://www.lond-amb.nhs.uk/aboutus/trus ... 7Sep05.pdf
"No one understood better than Stalin that the true object of propaganda is neither to convince nor even to persuade, but to produce a uniform pattern of public utterance in which the first trace of unorthodox thought immediately reveals itself as a jarring dissonance." Leonard Schapiro
Reply