Named Suspect: Hasib Hussain

"We need an official inquiry - now. Not a whitewash inquiry like Lord Hutton's. Or a punch-pulling inquiry like Lord Butler's. But an inquiry run by plain Mr or Mrs somebody." - Lt. Col. Crispin Black
An independent, public discussion, analysis and inquiry into the events of July 7th.

Named Suspect: Hasib Hussain

Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

09 Dec 2005, 12:46 #1

BASIC INFORMATION

Nationality: British

Age: 18 (September 16, 1986 – July 7, 2005)
Born in Leeds General Infirmary and raised in Beeston, Leeds, the youngest of four children and the youngest of the four alleged suicide bombers.

From: Holbeck, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

Family Background: Hasib Hussain was born to factory worker Mahmood and his wife Maniza, an interpreter for South Asian families at Leeds General Infirmary. Both parents were both born in Pakistan. Brothers: Imran. It is alleged that Hasib was staying with Imran and sister-in-law Shazia, in Colenso Mount, Holbeck, Beeston.

Education: Primary School - Ingram Road Primary School, Holbeck, Leeds.
Secondary School - South Leeds High School — formerly the Matthew Murray High School, Holbeck, Leeds.

Interests: Cricket - belonged to the local cricket team as a youngster. Football - member of Holbeck Hornets football team.

Allegations: Hasib Hussain is alleged to have been responsible for the explosion of the Number 30 bus that was diverted from it's usual route into Tavistock Square. The number 30 bus was the only bus to be diverted that morning and the only bus to have exploded. Investigators say they found his remains and personal effects on the bus.


There are many anomalies about the bus explosion. Further details about these anomalies here:

Anything that defies my sense of reason....: London 7/7: Number 30 Bus Explosion - Photos & Questions
http://antagonise.blogspot.com/2005/09/ ... osion.html

Anything that defies my sense of reason....: 7/7: London Bus Explosion Kicker
http://antagonise.blogspot.com/2005/08/ ... icker.html


MEDIA PROFILES OF HASIB HUSSAIN
From the BBC London Bombings archive.
HASIB MIR HUSSAIN, 18, FROM LEEDS
Teenager Hasib Hussain had been known as a tearaway during his early teens.

Hasib Hussain became devoutly religious after a trip to Pakistan

Newspapers reported how he would start fights with fellow pupils at the Matthew Murray Secondary school in Leeds.

He left school in July 2003 with seven GCSEs.

Around this time, he was sent to Pakistan to visit relatives. He also went on the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca, grew a beard and began to wear robes.

Despite becoming devoutly religious, he was arrested for shoplifting during 2004.

Neighbours said the 18-year-old had lived all his life in Colonso Mount in the Holbeck area of Leeds. One neighbour described the family as "very nice people".

He said: "We all knew them but I wouldn't say I knew them well. They were just a very nice family."

Hasib Hussain was born in Leeds in September 1986

Hasib Hussain had told his family he was going on a trip to London to visit friends.

But when he failed to return on Thursday, his parents reported him as missing to police.

He had in fact boarded the No 30 bus in London armed with enough explosives to rip the double-decker apart, killing 13 people.

His driving licence and cash cards were found in the mangled wreckage of the bus.

His family later said they were "devastated" by what had happened.

In a statement they described Hussain as "a loving and normal young man who gave us no concern".

"We are having difficulty taking this in," they said.

"Our thoughts are with all the bereaved families and we have to live ourselves with the loss of our son in these difficult circumstances.

"We had no knowledge of his activities and, had we done we would have done everything in our power to stop him. "

BBC News: Suicide Bombers 'ordinary lives'
Quoting the The Independent:
Hasib Hussain: The boy who grew up to bomb No 30 bus
14.07.05
By Arifa Akbar and Ian Herbert

Hasib Hussain and his three friends, Shahzad Tanweer, 22, Mohammed Sadique Khan, 30, and a man yet to be formally identified, have been revealed as the bombers responsible for last Thursday's atrocities

He was the tallest boy in his class. Hasib Hussain, aged 10, in his final year at Ingram Road Primary School in Holbeck, Leeds, was already showing signs of being a promising athlete and had ambitions to be a professional cricketer. But he was always an unassuming child.

A few years later, however, Hussain was to become one of Britain's first home-grown suicide bombers at the age of 18. One week ago yesterday, he told his mother he was going to London with friends for the night. Once there, he boarded a No 30 bus and detonated the last of the four bombs that shook the capital.

Yesterday, the multicultural community of Holbeck was coming to terms with the fact that Hussain, known as a quiet boy always overshadowed by his gregarious older brother Imran, was a suicide bomber.

The teenager and his three friends, Shahzad Tanweer, 22, Mohammed Sadique Khan, 30, and a man yet to be formally identified, have been revealed as the bombers responsible for last Thursday's atrocities.

Today, as London prepares to stage a two-minute silence in memory of the victims, the story of how the friends from Leeds became Britain's most notorious terrorists is coming to light.

The hunt for the perpetrators of England's worst terrorist outrage now centres on Beeston, a run down area of south Leeds close to the M62 junction serving the city. It is this place that has emerged as the crucible in which the bomb plot was formed - a plot which has left more than 50 dead and hundreds more injured and maimed 200 miles south in London's transport system.

Hussain, Shazhad and Mohammed Khan met at the district's Stratford Street mosque. It is increasingly likely that the fourth bomber went there as well to exchange ideas with the friends. They disguised their murderous intent under the cloak of a popular and vibrant community, hidden amid the thousands of Muslims from south Leeds who come here to attend the area's three mosques and the popular Asian shops.

Acquaintances said Hussain was once as passionate about football as he was about cricket. He was a member of the Holbeck Hornets football team, belonged to a local cricket team and was often seen playing in his whites.

One of the last conversations he had with his parents was on Wednesday afternoon. He told his mother, Maniza, that he intended to travel down to London the next day with "a few of the lads". He was casual about his plans, according to a resident, who said he had told Mrs Hussain: "I might go to London for the night and come back tomorrow morning."

His mother saw him asleep on the sofa a few hours later. She thought nothing of his plans. "He goes to stay with friends two or three times a month," said the resident.

But two days later, Hussain had not returned. His parents became frantic with worry that he may have been caught up in the disaster. They tried to ring him but there was no answer. Eventually, at 10.20pm on Thursday, they went to the police to report his absence and hand in a picture of him.

Hussain's older brother Imran - known in the Holbeck community as "Immy" - was so concerned he got several friends together and drove to London to search for his brother, local people said yesterday. "They asked for him in police stations and hospitals," said a friend.

It took nearly a week to establish the truth. Far from being a victim of the bus bombing, he was found to have been the perpetrator. His driving licence and cash cards were found in the wreckage in Tavistock Square. A man who said he was Hasib Hussain's uncle said yesterday his nephew was not "the type'' to be a bomber. "He was a nice lad. He was really nice,"he said. "He wasn't the type of guy to do it. He wouldn't do it. I wish in my heart he was still alive."

A series of setbacks in Hussain's life may be behind a sudden change from a British Asian who dressed in Western clothes to a religious teenager who wore Islamic garb and only stopped to say salaam to fellow Muslims.

School created the first setback. After attending Ingram Primary, he moved up to Matthew Murray secondary- now the Holbeck campus of South Leeds College - in September 1998, where he was entered for a number of GCSEs. But he was withdrawn by teachers from his GCSEs and left on 20 July 2003 with a GNVQ in business studies.

He had always found an escape in football. But, about two years ago, the Hornets' pitch was closed down. At about the same time, Hussain seemed to disappear into another world, according to associates.

"He was really into cricket and football. We would get together every weekend, then they closed the pitch down. I never saw him much after that until six to eight weeks ago," said a friend.

It seems he thought he had found Islam. He grew a beard and began dressing in traditional Muslim clothes. When he was last spotted by the friend he had shaved off his beard. Al-Qa'ida analysts have claimed that may be a sign of a radicalised Muslim's intention to become a terrorist. The friend said: "I asked him why he had shaved off the beard. He said it was a long story and that he did not like one mosque saying one thing and another mosque saying that was the wrong way. When he heard so many arguments he thought, 'Forget it. I will go my own way'."

It seems that he found no answers from the devoutly Islamic household where he grew up. He was close to Imran, according to locals. Imran, believed to be 24, works as an administrator in Leeds, and he has a young daughter.

But, according to some, Hussain's parents despaired of him for a time when, in the words of another friend, he went "off the rails" as an adolescent and they made desperate attempts to instil discipline into him. His father, Mahmood, a devout Muslim, is in bad health and has been unable to hold down a regular job.

Like the other three bombers, Hasib Hussain had strong links to Beeston, where the Hussains travelled to shop at the Asian grocery stores. One shopowner said: "They came to mosque and their parents came to our store for spices."

Children from Beeston also travelled to Holbeck to Matthew Murray school, including one of the men believed to be the fourth suicide bomber. Although Hussain's parents did not know it, his fatal association with the three men who joined him last Thursday may have dated back to those formative years at Ingram Primary School.

He was the tallest boy in his class. Hasib Hussain, aged 10, in his final year at Ingram Road Primary School in Holbeck, Leeds, was already showing signs of being a promising athlete and had ambitions to be a professional cricketer. But he was always an unassuming child.

A few years later, however, Hussain was to become one of Britain's first home-grown suicide bombers at the age of 18. One week ago yesterday, he told his mother he was going to London with friends for the night. Once there, he boarded a No 30 bus and detonated the last of the four bombs that shook the capital.

Yesterday, the multicultural community of Holbeck was coming to terms with the fact that Hussain, known as a quiet boy always overshadowed by his gregarious older brother Imran, was a suicide bomber.

The teenager and his three friends, Shahzad Tanweer, 22, Mohammed Sadique Khan, 30, and a man yet to be formally identified, have been revealed as the bombers responsible for last Thursday's atrocities.

Today, as London prepares to stage a two-minute silence in memory of the victims, the story of how the friends from Leeds became Britain's most notorious terrorists is coming to light.

The hunt for the perpetrators of England's worst terrorist outrage now centres on Beeston, a run down area of south Leeds close to the M62 junction serving the city. It is this place that has emerged as the crucible in which the bomb plot was formed - a plot which has left more than 50 dead and hundreds more injured and maimed 200 miles south in London's transport system.

Hussain, Shazhad and Mohammed Khan met at the district's Stratford Street mosque. It is increasingly likely that the fourth bomber went there as well to exchange ideas with the friends. They disguised their murderous intent under the cloak of a popular and vibrant community, hidden amid the thousands of Muslims from south Leeds who come here to attend the area's three mosques and the popular Asian shops.

Acquaintances said Hussain was once as passionate about football as he was about cricket. He was a member of the Holbeck Hornets football team, belonged to a local cricket team and was often seen playing in his whites.

One of the last conversations he had with his parents was on Wednesday afternoon. He told his mother, Maniza, that he intended to travel down to London the next day with "a few of the lads". He was casual about his plans, according to a resident, who said he had told Mrs Hussain: "I might go to London for the night and come back tomorrow morning."

His mother saw him asleep on the sofa a few hours later. She thought nothing of his plans. "He goes to stay with friends two or three times a month," said the resident.

But two days later, Hussain had not returned. His parents became frantic with worry that he may have been caught up in the disaster. They tried to ring him but there was no answer. Eventually, at 10.20pm on Thursday, they went to the police to report his absence and hand in a picture of him.

Hussain's older brother Imran - known in the Holbeck community as "Immy" - was so concerned he got several friends together and drove to London to search for his brother, local people said yesterday. "They asked for him in police stations and hospitals," said a friend.

It took nearly a week to establish the truth. Far from being a victim of the bus bombing, he was found to have been the perpetrator. His driving licence and cash cards were found in the wreckage in Tavistock Square. A man who said he was Hasib Hussain's uncle said yesterday his nephew was not "the type'' to be a bomber. "He was a nice lad. He was really nice,"he said. "He wasn't the type of guy to do it. He wouldn't do it. I wish in my heart he was still alive."

A series of setbacks in Hussain's life may be behind a sudden change from a British Asian who dressed in Western clothes to a religious teenager who wore Islamic garb and only stopped to say salaam to fellow Muslims.

School created the first setback. After attending Ingram Primary, he moved up to Matthew Murray secondary- now the Holbeck campus of South Leeds College - in September 1998, where he was entered for a number of GCSEs. But he was withdrawn by teachers from his GCSEs and left on 20 July 2003 with a GNVQ in business studies.

He had always found an escape in football. But, about two years ago, the Hornets' pitch was closed down. At about the same time, Hussain seemed to disappear into another world, according to associates.

"He was really into cricket and football. We would get together every weekend, then they closed the pitch down. I never saw him much after that until six to eight weeks ago," said a friend.

It seems he thought he had found Islam. He grew a beard and began dressing in traditional Muslim clothes. When he was last spotted by the friend he had shaved off his beard. Al-Qa'ida analysts have claimed that may be a sign of a radicalised Muslim's intention to become a terrorist. The friend said: "I asked him why he had shaved off the beard. He said it was a long story and that he did not like one mosque saying one thing and another mosque saying that was the wrong way. When he heard so many arguments he thought, 'Forget it. I will go my own way'."

It seems that he found no answers from the devoutly Islamic household where he grew up. He was close to Imran, according to locals. Imran, believed to be 24, works as an administrator in Leeds, and he has a young daughter.

But, according to some, Hussain's parents despaired of him for a time when, in the words of another friend, he went "off the rails" as an adolescent and they made desperate attempts to instil discipline into him. His father, Mahmood, a devout Muslim, is in bad health and has been unable to hold down a regular job.

Like the other three bombers, Hasib Hussain had strong links to Beeston, where the Hussains travelled to shop at the Asian grocery stores. One shopowner said: "They came to mosque and their parents came to our store for spices."

Children from Beeston also travelled to Holbeck to Matthew Murray school, including one of the men believed to be the fourth suicide bomber. Although Hussain's parents did not know it, his fatal association with the three men who joined him last Thursday may have dated back to those formative years at Ingram Primary School.

Source: The Independent

QUESTIONS
- Hasib Hussain was not present on 28 June, the day it is alleged the alleged suicide bombers performed a 'dummy run'. Why? What sort of a rehearsal was this?
- Hasib Hussain is alleged to have been responsible for the bus. If 7/7 was a coordinated simultaneous attack on the London Underground with devices primed to go off and 8:50, how is that Hasib Hussain was wandering around the tube system and London's rush-hour streets for almost an hour after the simultaneous bombs were primed to go off?

- The Two Day Gap. Quoting from the New Zealand Herald:
"One of the last conversations he had with his parents was on Wednesday afternoon. He told his mother, Maniza, that he intended to travel down to London the next day with "a few of the lads".  He was casual about his plans, according to a resident, who said he had told Mrs Hussain: "I might go to London for the night and come back tomorrow morning."
Then there is a gap of two days:
But, two days later, Mr Hussain had not returned. His parents became frantic with worry that he may have been caught up in the disaster. They tried to ring him but there was no answer. Eventually, at 10.20pm on Thursday, they went to the police to report his absence and hand in a picture of him.
Why a gap of two days? According to the 'official' story of events, the police were contacted ON THE NIGHT of 7 July, yet the New Zealand Herald states that this contact did not happen until two days after Wednesday which, according to my interpretation of a calendar, means that Hussain's family contacted the police on Friday night.




--
This is a working document and will be edited with information as and when found. Please feel free to provide additional links to information about the bombers and any corrections and clarifications where appropriate.
"The problem with always being a conformist is that when you try to change the system from within, it's not you who changes the system; it's the system that will eventually change you." -- Immortal Technique

"The media is the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power. Because they control the minds of the masses." -- Malcolm X

"The eternal fight is not many battles fought on one level, but one great battle fought on many different levels." -- The Antagonist

"Truth does not fear investigation." -- Unknown
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Joined: 04 Dec 2005, 17:55

28 Jan 2006, 21:28 #2

Bomber at Mcdonalds
a couple of days ago i wrote this post about 7/7 busbomber going to mcdonalds and calling his mates - and i mentioned the "plot development" where the story went from the Independent where 'he called his mates' to the Guardian where 'he called them at 9am' to the Times where some anonymous git was quoting the breathless vmails.

i wrote that post in the same way that i write most of my posts where i read an article and then comment on it, and then read another and quote from it and comment on it, and so on (rather than writing an 'article' where you'd do all the research first, before you start writing) .

in that post, after reading the Times piece, i wrote "i would imagine that much of the Times' report is pure fabrication." remarkably, this story didnt echo back through media. neither the Independent nor the Guardian have updated their stories or referred to the Times article - and hardly anyone else touched the story.

as far as i can tell, the bbc only came up with 2 sentences, and didnt mention the cctv footage at mcdonalds, and no mention of the vmails:

    "Hasib Hussain, 18, called his three accomplices on his mobile phone before killing 13 people on the No 30 bus.

    But Mohammad Sidique Khan, 30, Germaine Lindsay, 19, and Shehzad Tanweer, 22, had already killed themselves and 39 passengers on three Tube trains."

The Mirror offers just a few sentences - also ignoring both the McDonalds thing and the vmails:

    "THE bus bomber who killed 13 people in London made mobile calls to fellow gang members before blowing himself up, police believe.

    Hasib Hussain, 18, rang three different numbers just before 9am. All went unanswered...

    Police specialists have since uncovered details of a phone Hussain was carrying and checked billing records.

    Three trains and a bus were the targets that day. Hussain's calls also cast doubt on the idea that an unknown "mastermind" was in London on July 7.

    The source said: "He would have phoned that person instead of the other bombers.""

both the bbc and the Mirror repeat this lie: "The most likely explanation was that he had tried to board the Northern Line, but it was closed" - altho we know that isnt correct - there were no problems with the Northern Line. Even the Times said: " contrary to earlier reports, there were no problems on the north-bound section of the Northern Line."

wouldnt you think that that the media would at least be interested in a few elements of this story? imagine if there were some vmails from atta to some of his associates as they boarded the planes..

or how about the simple fact that there is cctv footage of hussain - isnt that supposed to be 'chilling' or something? or that fact that he stopped for a hamburger (or whatever)?

remember all the previous consternation that they were trying to understand what happened in 'the missing hour' and where he got on the bus and all that? surely part of that story is that he went and hung out at mickey D's answers some of that question? why the silence?

also note the Mirror's odd phrasing "a phone Hussain was carrying" - normally you'd say "Hussain's phone" right? or are they trying to provide cover for the fact that i'd previously called them on their bullshit that they said that they'd found Lindsay's phone number in Hussain's phone? the other interesting thing is that it has taken 6 weeks to find out this information from the phone records. has it taken the police 6 weeks to ask the phone company to get his records? i imagine that would have been one of the first things they did - they are trying to catch the 'mastermind' afterall - im sure they were onto the phone records immediately. are the constructing a story ex-poste?

and amid all the handwringing stories about "how could a brit kill his fellow citizens?" stories, is there not a single journo who comprehends the juxtaposition of an 'islamo-terrorist' going to McDonalds as a refuge? or wondering whether he bought a non-halal hamburger? even for ironic purposes - or clash-of-civilisation purposes - or just to highlight how confused he might be? nope. not only that. many of the reports dont even mention the visit. if he'd been cctv'd at Falafels R Us - itd be all over the news. surely. apparently, if it doesnt fit the narrative, its not news.

but in the media, i havent seen a single report even point to the absurdity/futility of him asking his friends for advice, even though he presumably knew they were dead. and theres no speculation as to why he waited so long to call them. and theres no indication as to what time he was cctv'd at McDonalds - if they were truly trying to understand his final hour, why not announce when he was seen there? he was seen there on cctv, and cctv images are time-stamped - its quite simple.

another interesting thing is the development of the story - the original story appears to have been the Independent which said "Hussain also made a number of telephone calls, at least one of which was to one of his fellow bombers" - from that, the story seemed to quickly morph into "he called all 3" - we also dont know when he called his friends other than "at around 9am" - which is a surprising lack of specificity - we are trying to unravel the last hour - for some reason, specifity isnt relevant in this case, even though phone records are presumably timestamped down to the second. why the secret?

this should be much easier than it is.

lets go back to the original Times article:

    "Hussain is believed to have first called Mohammad Sidique Khan, 30, the alleged leader of the group, saying: “I can’t get on a train. What should I do ?” Then in quick succession he left the same message for Shehzad Tanweer and Jermaine Lindsay as, clearly agitated about his next move, he hurried away from the station.

    A police source who has heard the telephone calls said: “His voice was getting more and more frantic with each call.” Investigators could tell from his breathless voice that Hussain was walking fast as he made these calls."

this anonymous police source wasnt quoted anywhere else - if these stories arent true, then s/he is lying for some other purpose. and given the lack of attention given to this story, we can imagine that the entire media establishment has been sucked into a story that was meant to perpetuate one or other myth. its increasingly looking similar to rollout of the dead brazilian story - altho we now know why the dead brazilian story was rolled out the way it was. we dont yet know why this story is being rolled out in this manner.
http://wotisitgood4.blogspot.com/2005_0 ... chive.html
Follow the numbers.
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Joined: 07 Dec 2005, 15:21

05 Feb 2006, 09:55 #3

2 August 2005
MY HASIB MUST HAVE BEEN BRAINWASHED
By Jeremy Armstrong
BUS suicide bomber Hasib Hussain, a boy who wouldn't harm a fly, must have been brainwashed, says his father.

In the first interview given by any relative of the July 7 London terrorists, dad-of-four Mohamed said of Hussain: "The boy I see on the TV news, the boy I see in the papers, is not the child I knew.

"He was the perfect son."

For Mohamed, a retired foundry worker, and Hussain's brother Imran, the days and nights since the atrocity that claimed 52 innocents have been long.

They cannot explain how a soft-hearted, unassuming 18-year-old, who was afraid of spiders and refused to kill flies or any insects, turned into a mass murderer.

Mohamed, who has worked hard all his life without so much as a parking fine, has found the news impossible to take in.

"He was due to start university in September, " he told the Mirror.


"He had also agreed to an arranged marriage with a young woman from Pakistan, though no date had been set.


"I know Shehzad (Tanweer, another bomber) came here to see him as I recognised the Mercedes.
"But there was no reason to question or suspect anything, because Hasib never did anything wrong. He was never a bit of bother to us.
"If a fly came into the house, he would catch it and take it outside. If there was a caterpillar in the garden, he would make sure it was safe. "I keep thinking that this must be some kind of mistake. That it must have been someone else who did this. I can only imagine that he was brainwashed into doing this.
"If I am wrong, then my son will face his reward in the next life."


The family waved Hussain off from their Leeds home when he told them he was going to London to see friends and would be "back on Thursday". The gang were later caught on CCTV at Luton.
Four days later, police knocked on the door in Leeds. Not only was Hussain dead, but he had taken the lives of 13 others on the No30 bus in Tavistock Square, Central London.

When he failed to get in touch and the family heard news of the bombings, brother Imran went through Hussain's computer and the numbers in his mobile phone memory. Imran chanced upon one for Jermaine "Jamal" Lindsay, 19, the King's Cross attacker. He also called a stored number that led him to 18 Alexandra Grove in Burley, Leeds, which is now known to be the bomb factory.


Imran knocked on the door there before an Army squad carried out a controlled explosion just to get in. He is relieved he did not succeed.
"I think that might have been a lucky escape," said Imran.


The family now feel betrayed by Mohammad Sidique Khan, the friend and school teaching assistant widely regarded as the cell leader. He would regularly sit in the Hussains' front room, beneath the traditional Muslim pictures on the walls, and speak for hours with Imran and Hasib.
"I was so close to Sid in so may ways," added Imran, a father-of-two. "Perhaps he was doing all that brainwashing and not uttering a word about it. That was a big betrayal."


Hasib's only visit to Pakistan since the age of eight months had been a trip to the outskirts of Islamabad for a wedding three years ago. He stayed for four weeks.
Imran recalled: "I stayed longer, but he had to go back to school.
"There was absolutely no sign of him becoming devoutly religious. He wore jeans and trainers, just like me."

His brother was born at Leeds General Infirmary on September 16, 1986. At the age of three, Hussain was sent to the Ingram Road Primary School nursery a few hundred yards from the family home and eventually moved to Matthew Murray comprehensive.
He earned GCSEs in English language, literature, mathematics, science, design technology and Urdu, as well as a GNVQ in business studies.


To Imran, now 25, Hasib was simply a good companion. He was no match for him at cricket - Imran was a Yorkshire under-14 player - and he was "hopeless" at football.
But the brothers attended gym together, where they boxed, and shared a love of snooker.


Imran played cricket with Tube bomber Tanweer in Beeston Park on the evening of July 6, hours before he set out with Hussain for London. Imran said: "We played 11-a-side among friends. How could he do that when he knew what he was about to carry out?"
On the same evening, Hussain told his mother he was heading to London to see friends and left with Tanweer and Khan in a hire car. "That was the last time we saw him," said Imran.


The Hussains were informed of the bombings at 11am on July 7 in a phone call from one of their daughters.
Imran took the call and immediately feared his brother might be injured. At 10pm that night, Mrs Hussain reported her son missing to the casualty bureau.
"I like to think that we may have helped in some way," said dad Mohamed. "Before we called, the police had no idea Hasib was there."

By Sunday July 10, when Hussain had not returned, a female police family liaison officer was sent in.
She later told Imran: "I think Hasib may be the bomber."
However, he remains unable entirely to accept that his brother was capable of such an act.

"Two weeks before he disappeared he called my mother to his room. He was sitting on the bed and asked her to get rid of the spider in there.
"He was so gentle. He was built like me physically, but people got the wrong idea - he was a big softie.
"We've not been shown any other forensic evidence to link him. It's just the credit card.

"I still think there will be evidence to prove he is innocent."

The Mirror
"We are not democrats for, among other reasons, democracy sooner or later leads to war and dictatorship. Just as we are not supporters of dictatorships, among other things, because dictatorship arouses a desire for democracy, provokes a return to democracy, and thus tends to perpetuate a vicious circle in which human society oscillates between open and brutal tyranny and a lying freedom." - Errico Malatesta, Democracy and Anarchy 1924
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Joined: 07 Dec 2005, 15:21

05 Feb 2006, 10:03 #4

Hussain's Story: Family struggle to understand why their gentle boy became a bomber
By Ian Herbert, North of England Correspondent
Published: 02 August 2005


His youthful complexion marked him out as the most enigmatic of all the London suicide bombers; a teenager who had not completed his full-time education yet who was prepared to explode a bomb on the No 30 bus in Tavistock Square.

Following the first interviews with any of the families of the 7 July bombers, The Independent has pieced together a portrait of the life and last-known movements of the youngest bomber, Hasib Hussain. It provides an insight into how his radicalisation went utterly undetected by those closest to him and how his bewildered family's frenetic attempt to find clues to his whereabouts in the hours after the bombings took his brother on an early-hours dash to London and to the door of the so-called bomb factory in Leeds.

If anything, the Hussains would have considered Hasib's older brother, Imran, a more likely confidant of the more senior Leeds bombers, Mohammad Sidique Khan and Shahzad Tanweer. Imran knew Khan as "Sid" and counted him as a very close friend. He also often played cricket with Shahzad - whom he met at the Tanweer family's chip shop in the 1980s - in Beeston Park, near the Hussains' home in the Holbeck district of Leeds.

The last cricket game between Imran and Tanweer took place on the evening on 6 July, hours before he set out with Hussain for London. "How could he do that when he knew what he was about to carry out?" said a family source, left bewildered and constantly close to tears.

At 11am on the morning after that cricket match, the Hussains were informed of the bombings in a telephone call from a daughter. Imran apparently took the call and was struck by the immediate thought that his brother might be injured. At 10pm that night, Mrs Hussain reported her son missing to the casualty bureau.

By the early hours of Saturday there was still no sign of Hasib and at 4am Imran set off with some cousins in his old Vauxhall Astra to find them. The group toured several hospitals before returning north.

Hussain's father, Mohammed, remains convinced that if his wife had not made the call to the casualty bureau the focus of the bombing investigation would not have shifted to Leeds. "I like to think that we may have helped in some way," said a family source. "Before we called, the police had no idea Hasib was there."

Her call coincided with two pieces of evidence found in the wreckage of the bombs - a fragment of Hussain's credit card and a remnant of Tanweer's membership card for the same Northern snooker club where the Hussains played. Hussain's provisional driving licence was also found on the bus.

As early as Saturday 9 July - three days before the Leeds police raids - detectives in West Yorkshire were being informed by the Metropolitan Police that Leeds might be home to a number of the bombers.

For around 24 hours, the force placed the Hussain house - 7 Colenso Mount - under surveillance. By Sunday, when Hussain had not appeared, a family liaison officer was sent in on a fishing expedition, knowing that she may well be visiting the bomber's parents. Even then, three days on, Mr and Mrs Hussain had no inkling of their son's involvement. Imran Hussain missed much of the meeting with the officer but sources suggest that as she was about to leave he took her to one side and said: "I think Hasib may be the bomber."

By then, Imran had combed his brother's computer and papers in his room. He found evidence to suggest a property at 18 Alexandra Grove, in Burley, Leeds, may be linked. Before police arrived to seal the property, he had marched up to the front door and knocked but got no answer. Eventually, an army bomb squad carried out a controlled explosion just to get in. "It turned out to be a bomb factory. I think that might have been a lucky escape," said a family source.

Imran also began examining a mobile telephone which his brother had left behind. Few numbers were stored in the directory but the name of the King's Cross bomber Germaine "Jamal" Lindsay, 19, was among them. Imran Hussain also called the stored number of a surgeon, Dr Shakir Al Ani, 57, who had the keys for the Alexandra Grove flat.

As he carried out his investigations, a bewildered Imran was forced to come to terms with a sudden radicalisation of which his brother had shown no sign.

In the weeks since the bombings, Hasib Hussain has been cast as a social misfit and drop-out whose overt and sudden radicalisation may have provided an early warning sign. Yet family sources reveal that he was a promising academic about to head for university and an arranged marriage. Their testimony also suggests it was highly improbable that he was exposed to radical madrassas - Islamic schools - in Pakistan, as his fellow bombers were.

He had won a place on a business studies degree course at Leeds University, starting in September. An arranged marriage to a college student in Pakistan was also in the pipeline. The boy's only visit to Pakistan since he was eight months old was a trip to the outskirts of Islamabad for his brother Imran's wedding three years ago. He stayed for four weeks before returning ahead of his brother, to get back to secondary school in Leeds. "There was absolutely no sign of him becoming devoutly religious. He wore jeans and trainers, just like me," said one family member.

Hussain's air of normality led his family to think little of his decision to leave Leeds for London on 6 July. "I'll be back on Thursday," he told them. By 7.48am on 7 July, he was boarding the Luton-King's Cross service. Within a few hours, his bomb destroyed the No 30 bus in Tavistock Square, killing him and 13 others.

It would have come as no surprise to Hussain that his father wanted him back in school soon after the Islamabad trip. Mohammed Hussain, a former foundry supervisor, holds much store in living by the rules. He frowns on smoking, for instance, and tells Imran's wife's Pakistani family that he would not have allowed the marriage to take place, were his son a smoker. His mantra to both sons was that they must "work very hard" to get well qualified before the aged of 25. Then they might be able to earn good money.

Mohammed and his wife Maniza - to whom Hasib was always closest - left Pakistan for the Holbeck district of Leeds 30 years ago. Hasib, who was born on 16 September 1986, was a gentle boy. "If a fly came into the house, he would catch it and take it outside. If there was a caterpillar in the garden, he would make sure it was safe. I can only imagine that he was brainwashed into doing this. I keep thinking that this must be some kind of mistake. That it must have been someone else who did this. If I am wrong, [he] will face his reward in the next life."

Hasib was not as gregarious as Imran, 25, but certainly had brains. He picked up GCSEs in English, literature, mathematics, science, design technology and Urdu, as well as a GNVQ in business studies. He was the subject of minor disciplinary discussions with his teachers - relating to graffiti and not delivering homework on time, the school says.

He was no match at cricket for his brother Imran - who was a Yorkshire under-14 player - and he was evidently "hopeless" at football. But the brothers regularly attended gyms together in nearby Beeston, where they boxed. Hasib was fond of attaching himself to cardiograph machines for treadmill work. The two also played snooker at a number of Leeds venues, including the Northern Club on Kirkstall Road.

The teenager also loved a mountain bike he bought from a friend, which now gathers dust in the cellar of the family home. He would pedal across Leeds to Roundhay Park and back. He also jogged the streets around the family home and was a keen swimmer. He had shed several stones in recent months, after becoming quite chubby, though his family did not read it as a sign of profound change.

It is gradually dawning on the Hussains that the radicalised young bombers met at the family home. Mr Hussain recalls seeing Tanweer's distinctive maroon Mercedes outside. Khan would sit in the Hussains' front room for hours with Imran and Hasib, yet never mentioned politics in the family's presence.

The Hussains have not contacted the Tanweers, but a family member saw a brother of Khan's in Beeston. "Perhaps [Khan] was doing all that brainwashing and not uttering a word about it. That was a big betrayal," said a family source.

His youthful complexion marked him out as the most enigmatic of all the London suicide bombers; a teenager who had not completed his full-time education yet who was prepared to explode a bomb on the No 30 bus in Tavistock Square.

Following the first interviews with any of the families of the 7 July bombers, The Independent has pieced together a portrait of the life and last-known movements of the youngest bomber, Hasib Hussain. It provides an insight into how his radicalisation went utterly undetected by those closest to him and how his bewildered family's frenetic attempt to find clues to his whereabouts in the hours after the bombings took his brother on an early-hours dash to London and to the door of the so-called bomb factory in Leeds.

If anything, the Hussains would have considered Hasib's older brother, Imran, a more likely confidant of the more senior Leeds bombers, Mohammad Sidique Khan and Shahzad Tanweer. Imran knew Khan as "Sid" and counted him as a very close friend. He also often played cricket with Shahzad - whom he met at the Tanweer family's chip shop in the 1980s - in Beeston Park, near the Hussains' home in the Holbeck district of Leeds.

The last cricket game between Imran and Tanweer took place on the evening on 6 July, hours before he set out with Hussain for London. "How could he do that when he knew what he was about to carry out?" said a family source, left bewildered and constantly close to tears.

At 11am on the morning after that cricket match, the Hussains were informed of the bombings in a telephone call from a daughter. Imran apparently took the call and was struck by the immediate thought that his brother might be injured. At 10pm that night, Mrs Hussain reported her son missing to the casualty bureau.

By the early hours of Saturday there was still no sign of Hasib and at 4am Imran set off with some cousins in his old Vauxhall Astra to find them. The group toured several hospitals before returning north.

Hussain's father, Mohammed, remains convinced that if his wife had not made the call to the casualty bureau the focus of the bombing investigation would not have shifted to Leeds. "I like to think that we may have helped in some way," said a family source. "Before we called, the police had no idea Hasib was there."

Her call coincided with two pieces of evidence found in the wreckage of the bombs - a fragment of Hussain's credit card and a remnant of Tanweer's membership card for the same Northern snooker club where the Hussains played. Hussain's provisional driving licence was also found on the bus.

As early as Saturday 9 July - three days before the Leeds police raids - detectives in West Yorkshire were being informed by the Metropolitan Police that Leeds might be home to a number of the bombers.

For around 24 hours, the force placed the Hussain house - 7 Colenso Mount - under surveillance. By Sunday, when Hussain had not appeared, a family liaison officer was sent in on a fishing expedition, knowing that she may well be visiting the bomber's parents. Even then, three days on, Mr and Mrs Hussain had no inkling of their son's involvement. Imran Hussain missed much of the meeting with the officer but sources suggest that as she was about to leave he took her to one side and said: "I think Hasib may be the bomber."

By then, Imran had combed his brother's computer and papers in his room. He found evidence to suggest a property at 18 Alexandra Grove, in Burley, Leeds, may be linked. Before police arrived to seal the property, he had marched up to the front door and knocked but got no answer. Eventually, an army bomb squad carried out a controlled explosion just to get in. "It turned out to be a bomb factory. I think that might have been a lucky escape," said a family source.

Imran also began examining a mobile telephone which his brother had left behind. Few numbers were stored in the directory but the name of the King's Cross bomber Germaine "Jamal" Lindsay, 19, was among them. Imran Hussain also called the stored number of a surgeon, Dr Shakir Al Ani, 57, who had the keys for the Alexandra Grove flat.

As he carried out his investigations, a bewildered Imran was forced to come to terms with a sudden radicalisation of which his brother had shown no sign.

In the weeks since the bombings, Hasib Hussain has been cast as a social misfit and drop-out whose overt and sudden radicalisation may have provided an early warning sign. Yet family sources reveal that he was a promising academic about to head for university and an arranged marriage. Their testimony also suggests it was highly improbable that he was exposed to radical madrassas - Islamic schools - in Pakistan, as his fellow bombers were.

He had won a place on a business studies degree course at Leeds University, starting in September. An arranged marriage to a college student in Pakistan was also in the pipeline. The boy's only visit to Pakistan since he was eight months old was a trip to the outskirts of Islamabad for his brother Imran's wedding three years ago. He stayed for four weeks before returning ahead of his brother, to get back to secondary school in Leeds. "There was absolutely no sign of him becoming devoutly religious. He wore jeans and trainers, just like me," said one family member.

Hussain's air of normality led his family to think little of his decision to leave Leeds for London on 6 July. "I'll be back on Thursday," he told them. By 7.48am on 7 July, he was boarding the Luton-King's Cross service. Within a few hours, his bomb destroyed the No 30 bus in Tavistock Square, killing him and 13 others.

It would have come as no surprise to Hussain that his father wanted him back in school soon after the Islamabad trip. Mohammed Hussain, a former foundry supervisor, holds much store in living by the rules. He frowns on smoking, for instance, and tells Imran's wife's Pakistani family that he would not have allowed the marriage to take place, were his son a smoker. His mantra to both sons was that they must "work very hard" to get well qualified before the aged of 25. Then they might be able to earn good money.

Mohammed and his wife Maniza - to whom Hasib was always closest - left Pakistan for the Holbeck district of Leeds 30 years ago. Hasib, who was born on 16 September 1986, was a gentle boy. "If a fly came into the house, he would catch it and take it outside. If there was a caterpillar in the garden, he would make sure it was safe. I can only imagine that he was brainwashed into doing this. I keep thinking that this must be some kind of mistake. That it must have been someone else who did this. If I am wrong, [he] will face his reward in the next life."

Hasib was not as gregarious as Imran, 25, but certainly had brains. He picked up GCSEs in English, literature, mathematics, science, design technology and Urdu, as well as a GNVQ in business studies. He was the subject of minor disciplinary discussions with his teachers - relating to graffiti and not delivering homework on time, the school says.

He was no match at cricket for his brother Imran - who was a Yorkshire under-14 player - and he was evidently "hopeless" at football. But the brothers regularly attended gyms together in nearby Beeston, where they boxed. Hasib was fond of attaching himself to cardiograph machines for treadmill work. The two also played snooker at a number of Leeds venues, including the Northern Club on Kirkstall Road.

The teenager also loved a mountain bike he bought from a friend, which now gathers dust in the cellar of the family home. He would pedal across Leeds to Roundhay Park and back. He also jogged the streets around the family home and was a keen swimmer. He had shed several stones in recent months, after becoming quite chubby, though his family did not read it as a sign of profound change.

It is gradually dawning on the Hussains that the radicalised young bombers met at the family home. Mr Hussain recalls seeing Tanweer's distinctive maroon Mercedes outside. Khan would sit in the Hussains' front room for hours with Imran and Hasib, yet never mentioned politics in the family's presence.

The Hussains have not contacted the Tanweers, but a family member saw a brother of Khan's in Beeston. "Perhaps [Khan] was doing all that brainwashing and not uttering a word about it. That was a big betrayal," said a family source.
 

The Independent
Notice the glaring differences between how these two interviews have been reported. Whereas the Mirror directly quoted Imran, the Independent used the same quotes but attributed them to a `family source' - why is that?

The Independent interview spoke of Hasib's love for sport:

`The teenager also loved a mountain bike he bought from a friend, which now gathers dust in the cellar of the family home. He would pedal across Leeds to Roundhay Park and back. He also jogged the streets around the family home and was a keen swimmer. He had shed several stones in recent months, after becoming quite chubby, although his family did not read it as a sign of profound change.'

The last part of that paragraph bothers me `although his family did not read it as a sign of profound change'. Who says it was? We've been led to believe his love of keeping fit was a `sign of profound change' by stories like that! NObody knows if it was a `sign of profound change' or not - and interestingly, the Independent isn't even saying themselves that it was - they are suggesting it. To make Hasib fit the description of what we've been told he is?

There's a very telling discrepancy when both papers spoke of the occasion when a police liaison officer visited the Hussain family home on July 10th. The Mirror says

`By Sunday July 10th, when Hussain has not returned, a female police family liaison officer was sent in. She later told Imran, `I think Hasib may be the bomber'.

However, the Independent reported it:

`By Sunday, when Hussain had not appeared, a family liaison officer was sent in on a fishing expedition, knowing she way well be visiting the bombers parents. Even then, three days on, Mr and Mrs. Hussain had no inkling of their son's involvement. Imran Hussain missed most of the meeting with the officer but sources suggest that as she was about to leave he took her to one side and said `I think Hasib may be the bomber.'

So according to one newspaper, it was the police officer who said `I think Hasib may be the bomber' but according to the other one, it was Imran, Hasib's brother who said it. Spot the flaw!
"We are not democrats for, among other reasons, democracy sooner or later leads to war and dictatorship. Just as we are not supporters of dictatorships, among other things, because dictatorship arouses a desire for democracy, provokes a return to democracy, and thus tends to perpetuate a vicious circle in which human society oscillates between open and brutal tyranny and a lying freedom." - Errico Malatesta, Democracy and Anarchy 1924
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Joined: 07 Dec 2005, 15:21

23 Feb 2006, 18:37 #5

'Slow, gentle giant' who blew up the No 30 bus and killed 13 others
Exclusive
by Ian Rosser education reporter

Hasib Hussain was an unremarkable high school student.
His tutors describe him as a "slow, gentle giant" who was "perfectly normal".
In fact, he was so ordinary that – until two weeks ago – many of his teachers may have had difficulty remembering him at all.

Now, however, he will be remembered as the suicide bomber who claimed 14 lives when he blew up the No 30 bus in London's Tavistock Square.
"He was a perfectly normal student," said Colin Bell, headteacher of South Leeds High, which was formed last year following the merger of Merlyn Rees and Matthew Murray – Hussain's former school.

"Like many other teenagers, he had issues and there were some disciplinary matters to deal with. One was about graffiti and another was about not producing homework. Overall, it was fairly low-level stuff. In some ways that's been the difficult part for the school to deal with."

Mr Bell said reports that had painted Hussain as a school failure who never sat his GCSE exams and spread warning leaflets around the school following the US September 11 attacks were wrong.
"There has been a lot of misinformation spread about this young man," he said. "He did the GCSEs, contrary to reports in the media, and he did not spread leaflets of hate mail around the school. It's just not true.


"We are as staggered as anyone else that this has happened and there was absolutely no indication during his time here that it would. There has been an element of disbelief and disappointment. Everybody is clear about how abhorrent such an act was, but as a general rule, the school carries on as normal.

"The children here need consistency, and that's what we are trying to give them. There are children who are certainly more subdued than normal. For the most part they are children from the Beeston community who may have known Hasib."
Hussain was at Matthew Murray from 1998 to 2003, during which time he had a good attendance record. He achieved GCSEs in English language, English literature, maths, science, Urdu, design technology and a GNVQ in business studies. He went on to study at Thomas Danby College on Roundhay Road in Leeds, where he gained an AVCE in business this year.

One of Hussain's fellow suicide bombers, Shehzad Tanweer, had an even more successful school career. While studying at Wortley High from 1994 to 2001, he gained good GCSE grades in science, maths, geography, English language, English literature, French, PE and religion education.

He also passed technology and IT exams before going on to study biology and English literature at A-level. Tanweer also studied at Thomas Danby before moving on to start a sports science degree at Leeds Metropolitan University.

Chris Edwards, chief executive of Education Leeds, which runs school support services, said both the men, plus the third suicide bomber from Leeds – Mohammad Sidique Khan – had all been part of the city's education set-up.
"From what I have been told, Hasib Hussain was a fairly slow, gentle giant. What happened after he left school, we don't know. If we want to analyse this, it's much more complicated than a supposed failure of the education system.
"He wasn't a failure in terms of the system."
l In tomorrow's YEP: How schools cope in a crisis.
20 July 2005

Leeds Today
"We are not democrats for, among other reasons, democracy sooner or later leads to war and dictatorship. Just as we are not supporters of dictatorships, among other things, because dictatorship arouses a desire for democracy, provokes a return to democracy, and thus tends to perpetuate a vicious circle in which human society oscillates between open and brutal tyranny and a lying freedom." - Errico Malatesta, Democracy and Anarchy 1924
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Joined: 07 Dec 2005, 15:21

23 Feb 2006, 18:54 #6

Hussain 'snacked before attack on London bus'

By Deborah Haynes

London - As British police probe the final hour of one of the four London bombers, reports on Thursday claimed he ate a snack at a McDonald's and left frantic phone messages for his accomplices before blowing himself up.

The reports in several British newspapers appear to shed some light on the "missing hour" between the synchronised July 7 suicide attacks on three subway trains and 18-year-old Hassib Hussain's solo strike on a bus.

The Times speculated that Hussain, the youngest member of the gang, simply lost his nerve about also targeting a London Underground train after the four had split up at King's Cross station in the north of the capital.

It quoted a source close to the investigation wondering who then persuaded the young Muslim from Leeds, northern England, to choose a double-decker bus for a target.

A police spokesperson at Scotland Yard refused to comment on the reports.

Hussain detonated his bomb at Tavistock Square, central London, at 9.47am. The blast came 57 minutes after the three other bombers hit subway trains travelling south, east and west from King's Cross.

Britain's worst terrorist atrocity left 56 people dead, including the four attackers.

It has been claimed that Hussain was meant to target a northbound Northern line subway train to create a so-called burning cross through the heart of the city, but that this plan was thwarted after the line was suspended.

However, a spokesperson for the network operator, Transport for London, said all six subway lines running through King's Cross were working at 8.50am, the time of the bombings.

"The theory that he took a bus because he couldn't take the Northern Line is not correct because he could have taken the Northern line because it was running," the spokesperson said on Thursday.


Closed circuit television (CCTV) footage captured all four men arriving at King's Cross on an over-ground train from Luton, a town north of London.

The Independent and Times newspapers reported that Hussain was later caught on CCTV camera entering a McDonald's outlet in King's Cross.

"There appears to be no evidence Hussain met anyone else during his visit to McDonald's and it is, as yet, unclear which route he took to his target," The Independent said.

The Times said Hussain - knowing he and his team were meant to sychronise their attack - rushed out of the station and into the fast food restaurant, where he tried to reach the other three by telephone just before 9.00am.

By then they were already dead.

It said that he first tried to call Mohammad Sidique Khan, 30, the group's alleged ringleader, saying: "I can't get on a train. What should I do?"

The young man hurriedly left the same message for Shehzhad Tanweer, 22, and 19-year-old Jermaine Lindsay.

The Times quoted a police source, who had listened to the calls, saying: "His voice was getting more and more frantic with each call."

Hussain's final actions have cast doubt on whether there was, as suggested, an al-Qaeda mastermind or support network behind the carnage as he would more likely have telephoned them for help.

But a source close to the investigation told The Times: "He must have known from the fact that he couldn't raise any of his accomplices that they were already dead, and yet he picked a new target and went through with his plan. We need to know who persuaded him to do that."

The young Muslim made no attempt to telephone anyone from his family.

Police have pored over hours of CCTV images, telephone records and witness statements since the attacks almost two months ago.

Police sources in The Independent confirmed there did not seem to be a link between the July 7 bombings and a failed copycat strike two weeks later.

Hussain's choice of a bus was apparently spontaneous, but on July 21, the alleged would-be suicide bombers deliberately targeted three trains and a bus. - Sapa-AFP



Published on the Web by IOL on 2005-08-25 15:08:00

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"We are not democrats for, among other reasons, democracy sooner or later leads to war and dictatorship. Just as we are not supporters of dictatorships, among other things, because dictatorship arouses a desire for democracy, provokes a return to democracy, and thus tends to perpetuate a vicious circle in which human society oscillates between open and brutal tyranny and a lying freedom." - Errico Malatesta, Democracy and Anarchy 1924
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Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 11:41

28 Feb 2006, 01:32 #7

Hasib Hussain, 18

Hasib Hussain, also of Leeds, had told his parents he was going to London on July 7 to attend a religious studies seminar.

The six-foot-tall soccer player had become a devout Muslim after a visit to Pakistan, his parents' homeland, during the past two years.

While his friends said Hussain had become more religious, they said he never abandoned his boyfriend friends for radicals.

Hussain was arrested in 2004 for shoplifting and was let off with a caution.

After the bombings, his family -- described by neighbours as very nice people -- called the police and reported him missing.

Police believe Hussain is responsible for carrying out the attack on the No. 30 double-decker bus near London's Tavistock Square which claimed the lives of 13 people.

Hussain's identification, and remains matching his description, was found by police at the bomb site.

Based on CCTV images, police were able to determine that he arrived at Luton station, carrying a backpack, on the Thursday morning at about 7:20 local time.

Luton train station is about 30 minutes away from London's central King's Cross station on the ThamesLink line.

"We need to establish his movements up until 9:47 a.m. when the explosion occurred at Tavistock Square, and in particular, his movements between the time he left King's Cross and when he boarded the Number 30 bus," said anti-terrorist branch chief Peter Clarke, appealing for the public to come forward with any new information.

Source:  Canada TV
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